Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created some tables in postgres, added a foreign key from one table to another and set ON DELETE to CASCADE. Strangely enough, I have some fields that appear to be violating this constraint.

Is this normal behaviour? And if so, is there a way to get the behaviour I want (no violations possible)?

Edit:

I orginaly created the foreign key as part of CREATE TABLE, just using

... REFERENCES product (id) ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE

The current code pgAdmin3 gives is

ALTER TABLE cultivar
  ADD CONSTRAINT cultivar_id_fkey FOREIGN KEY (id)
      REFERENCES product (id) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE;

Edit 2:

To Clarify, I have a sneaking suspicion that the constraints are only checked when updates/inserts happen but are then never looked at again. Unfortunately I don't know enough about postgres to find out if this is true or how fields could end up in the database without those checks being run.

If this is the case, is there some way to check all the foreign keys and fix those problems?

share|improve this question
    
just for a sanity check can you post the statement you used to create the FK? –  matt b Oct 18 '10 at 17:50
    
What version of PG are you on? –  Bob Oct 18 '10 at 20:48
    
I'm using version 8.3 –  Michael Clerx Oct 18 '10 at 21:18
    
Give a small running example how to reproduce your problem. Ie sql to create tables, populate it etc. –  jira Oct 19 '10 at 0:36
    
Thing is, I've got no idea how it got into that situation. All I know is I created two tables, added the foreign key, inserted a load of data and let the system run a bit. Then - while I was fixing errors - I came across these fields where the foreign key's constraint does not hold. Now I thought that wasn't possible, but maybe they're only implemented in a one-shot way? Checked with inserts/updates but then never looked at again? –  Michael Clerx Oct 19 '10 at 0:38
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

I tried to create a simple example that shows foreign key constraint being enforced. With this example I prove I'm not allowed to enter data that violates the fk and I prove that if the fk is not in place during insert, and I enable the fk, the fk constraint throws an error telling me data violates the fk. So I'm not seeing how you have data in the table that violates a fk that is in place. I'm on 9.0, but this should not be different on 8.3. If you can show a working example that proves your issue that might help.

--CREATE TABLES--
CREATE TABLE parent
(
  parent_id integer NOT NULL,
  first_name character varying(50) NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT pk_parent PRIMARY KEY (parent_id)
)
WITH (
  OIDS=FALSE
);
ALTER TABLE parent OWNER TO postgres;

CREATE TABLE child
(
  child_id integer NOT NULL,
  parent_id integer NOT NULL,
  first_name character varying(50) NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT pk_child PRIMARY KEY (child_id),
  CONSTRAINT fk1_child FOREIGN KEY (parent_id)
      REFERENCES parent (parent_id) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
)
WITH (
  OIDS=FALSE
);
ALTER TABLE child OWNER TO postgres;
--CREATE TABLES--

--INSERT TEST DATA--
INSERT INTO parent(parent_id,first_name)
SELECT 1,'Daddy'
UNION 
SELECT 2,'Mommy';

INSERT INTO child(child_id,parent_id,first_name)
SELECT 1,1,'Billy'
UNION 
SELECT 2,1,'Jenny'
UNION 
SELECT 3,1,'Kimmy'
UNION 
SELECT 4,2,'Billy'
UNION 
SELECT 5,2,'Jenny'
UNION 
SELECT 6,2,'Kimmy';
--INSERT TEST DATA--

--SHOW THE DATA WE HAVE--
select parent.first_name,
       child.first_name
from parent
inner join child
        on child.parent_id = parent.parent_id
order by parent.first_name, child.first_name asc;
--SHOW THE DATA WE HAVE--

--DELETE PARENT WHO HAS CHILDREN--
BEGIN TRANSACTION;
delete from parent
where parent_id = 1;

--Check to see if any children that were linked to Daddy are still there?
--None there so the cascade delete worked.
select parent.first_name,
       child.first_name
from parent
right outer join child
        on child.parent_id = parent.parent_id
order by parent.first_name, child.first_name asc;
ROLLBACK TRANSACTION;


--TRY ALLOW NO REFERENTIAL DATA IN--
BEGIN TRANSACTION;

--Get rid of fk constraint so we can insert red headed step child
ALTER TABLE child DROP CONSTRAINT fk1_child;

INSERT INTO child(child_id,parent_id,first_name)
SELECT 7,99999,'Red Headed Step Child';

select parent.first_name,
       child.first_name
from parent
right outer join child
        on child.parent_id = parent.parent_id
order by parent.first_name, child.first_name asc;

--Will throw FK check violation because parent 99999 doesn't exist in parent table
ALTER TABLE child
  ADD CONSTRAINT fk1_child FOREIGN KEY (parent_id)
      REFERENCES parent (parent_id) MATCH SIMPLE
      ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE;

ROLLBACK TRANSACTION;
--TRY ALLOW NO REFERENTIAL DATA IN--

--DROP TABLE parent;
--DROP TABLE child;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for trying! –  Michael Clerx Oct 19 '10 at 20:20
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Everything I've read so far seems to suggest that constraints are only checked when the data is inserted. (Or when the constraint is created) For example the manual on set constraints.

This makes sense and - if the database works properly - should be good enough. I'm still curious how I managed to circumvent this or if I just read the situation wrong and there was never a real constraint violation to begin with.

Either way, case closed :-/

------- UPDATE --------

There was definitely a constraint violation, caused by a faulty trigger. Here's a script to replicate:

-- Create master table
CREATE TABLE product
(
  id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
);

-- Create second table, referencing the first
CREATE TABLE example
(
  id int PRIMARY KEY REFERENCES product (id) ON DELETE CASCADE
);

-- Create a (broken) trigger function
--CREATE LANGUAGE plpgsql;
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION delete_product()
  RETURNS trigger AS
$BODY$
    BEGIN
      DELETE FROM product WHERE product.id = OLD.id;
      -- This is an error!
      RETURN null;
    END;
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql;

-- Add it to the second table
CREATE TRIGGER example_delete
  BEFORE DELETE
  ON example
  FOR EACH ROW
  EXECUTE PROCEDURE delete_product();

-- Now lets add a row
INSERT INTO product (id) VALUES (1);
INSERT INTO example (id) VALUES (1);

-- And now lets delete the row
DELETE FROM example WHERE id = 1;

/*
Now if everything is working, this should return two columns: (pid,eid)=(1,1). However, it returns only the example id, so (pid,eid)=(0,1). This means the foreign key constraint on the example table is violated.
*/
SELECT product.id AS pid, example.id AS eid FROM product FULL JOIN example ON product.id = example.id;
share|improve this answer
    
There was never a real constraint violation. –  Unreason Oct 25 '10 at 13:18
    
I realised I handled this situation a little strangely, so I made the extra effort and replicated the situation that caused my initial problems. –  Michael Clerx Oct 25 '10 at 15:08
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.