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I have a function definition, where i call multiple functions. Even if one of the function fails i need to go ahead and call the rest of the functions and finally return a single error saying whether any of the function call failed. The approach which i had followed was

int function foo()

{


    int res, res1, res2, res3;

    res1 = function1();
    res2 = function2();
    res3 = function3();

    if (res1 == -1 || res2 == -1 || res3 == -1)
    {
         res = -1;
    }

    return res;
}

The possible another approach is

int function foo()

{


   int res;

   if (function1() == -1)
   {
        res = -1;
   }

   if (function2() == -1)
   {
        res = -1;
   }

   if (function3() == -1)
   {
       res = -1;
   } 

   return res;
}

Which is a better approach? Thanks in advance.

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5  
I like the third approach best, but you need to initialize your res variable in case none of the functions fail! –  Amardeep Oct 18 '10 at 18:15
    
Vote for 2nd... –  valdo Oct 18 '10 at 18:17
2  
This isn't C or C++. First of all, pick a language. You aren't working in two different languages. Second, there is no function keyword. –  GManNickG Oct 18 '10 at 19:49
    
One thing you need to consider is what do you want to return if all the functions succeed? Right now both your examples return an indeterminate value. –  Michael Burr Oct 18 '10 at 22:13
1  
In both cases you'll want to set res to something (other than -1) so that checking the return value doesn't invoke undefined behaviour when the function succeeds (at the moment its value is undefined if the function succeeds). This may be obvious, but thought I'd point it out. –  Michael Anderson Oct 19 '10 at 4:38

16 Answers 16

No difference at all, both will be optimized to same machine code. Preference, maintainability, and that depends on team guidelines, preferences.

share|improve this answer
    
The compiler's optimizations are restricted in ways yours are not by the language's semantics and worst-case assumptions. I very strongly doubt both approaches will end up producing the same machine code: the first approach requires short-circuit evaluation and only updates res at most once; the second approach sets res up to 3 times and tests each result independently, rather than short-circuiting. It also bears pointing out that both approaches return an uninitialized value whenever all calls succeed. –  Jeremy W. Sherman Oct 19 '10 at 18:43

First priority, make the code correct. That's more important than readability and optimization.

That means you need to consider what the function should return in the case where the functions it calls all succeed.

Many of the answers given to this question change the result returned or might return a failure indication if the 'sub-functions' all succeed. you need to take care not to do this.

Personally, I think the overall form of your first option is pretty good - it makes clear that the 3 sub-functions are called regardless of whether one or more of them fail. The one problem is that it returns an indeterminate result if all those functions succeed.

Be wary of answers that use bitwise-or to combine results - there are at least 2 potential problems:

  1. as John Marshall pointed out in several comments, the order of evaluation is indeterminate. This means that if you simply string the function calls with bitwise-or the functions may be called in any order. This might not be a problem if there are no ordering dependencies between the functions, but usually there are - especially if you don't care about the returned value except as a s success/fail indicator (if you aren't using the return value, then the only reason to call the function is for its side effects)

  2. If the functions can return positive, non-zero values when they succeed, then testing for failure becomes a bit trickier than just checking if the results or'ed together are non-zero.

Given these two potential problems, I think there's little reason to try to do anything much fancier than option 1 (or your second option) - just make sure you set res to a success value (0?) for the situation where none of the sub-functions fail.

share|improve this answer

What about:

int foo ()
{
    bool failed = false;
    failed |= (function1() != 0);
    failed |= (function2() != 0);
    failed |= (function3() != 0);
    return failed? -1 : 0;
}

You could also collapse the three calls into a single expression and omit the failed variable altogether (at the expense of readability):

int foo ()
{
    return ((function1() != 0) | (function2() !=0 ) | (function3() != 0))? -1 : 0;
}

I like the first approach when function1 function2 and function3 have the same signature because I can put them in a function pointer table and loop over the entries, which makes adding function4 alot easier.

share|improve this answer
    
Your second approach won't work - it isn't guaranteed to call all the functions. Your first approach will work but seems a bit complicated for such a simple operation. –  Dakota Hawkins Oct 18 '10 at 18:23
    
You're right. I changed it for bitwise | instead of logical || just as in another proposed solution so that it always evaluates all the functions now. –  André Caron Oct 18 '10 at 18:34
1  
And now it suffers from the arbitrary call order problem that also exists in Jack's answer, as pointed out by John Marshall. –  Ben Voigt Oct 19 '10 at 4:28
    
I prefer the first form in any case. The effect, as well as the order are more clearly conveyed. Moreover, a single temporary is used and a single check is done at the end, achieving the best of both of the forms the poster proposed. –  André Caron Oct 19 '10 at 6:19

If you can define any precise convention about return values you can simply use bitwise or:

int foo() {
  if (function1() | function2() | function3())
    return -1;
  else
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
That is true but might be too confusing. –  Dakota Hawkins Oct 18 '10 at 18:24
5  
It will call all of them, it's not logical OR but bitwise OR.. there's not lazy evaluation in there.. –  Jack Oct 18 '10 at 18:25
1  
Why not simply return function1() | function2() | function3();? I see no need for the conditional statement. –  FredOverflow Oct 18 '10 at 18:33
2  
-1. This is not equivalent to the original code in that the order in which the three functions are called is not specified. (While the OP didn't say whether this was important, clearly the conservative assumption is that it is.) –  John Marshall Oct 18 '10 at 19:18
1  
@John Marshall: -1 for this useless issue? Just giving predence with parenthesis will allow you to choose whichever order you want. :) You should be less irrevocabile with your intents. –  Jack Oct 18 '10 at 20:02

I like the second approach better. If you want one-liners, you can do something like...

char success = 1;

success &= (foo() == desired_result_1);
success &= (bar() == desired_result_2);

etc.

share|improve this answer

The 2nd is a "better" approach. However, I'd go more without the needless carrying around of an indicator variable:

if( function2() == -1 ){
    return -1;
}

Suggestion: (no magic numbers)

I'd also not use "magic numbers" like you've used it. Instead:

if( check_fail( function2() ) ){
    return FAILED;
}

more clearly illustrated what you're thinking. Intent is easier to maintain. Magic numbers can sometimes wind up hurting you. For instance, I've known financial guys who couldn't understand why a transaction costing "$-1.00" caused their application to behave abnormally.

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4  
Given that he states "Even if one of the function fails i need to go ahead and call the rest of the functions" your suggested approach doesn't work. –  torak Oct 18 '10 at 18:22
    
@torak I read that as a limitation to what he said his solution was doing rather than a requirement. –  wheaties Oct 18 '10 at 18:24

In the first form you're not checking the status until all 3 calls are completed. I think this signals your intent the clearest. The second form more closely resembles the more usual case, where you return early if an error is detected.

It's a subtle thing either way. You shouldn't be asking us strangers on the internet, you should be asking the rest of your team, because they're the ones who will have to live with it.

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You use bitwise operators to make a 'neat' variant that doesn't need temp variables and has other fancyness too(with the more advanced operators): return func1()|func2();(this is the same as using logical or, ||). However, if you require checking a specific function in the callee, you can create a bitset: return func1() << 1 | func2(); (this assumes that they return 1 or zero)

share|improve this answer
    
Another answer that doesn't make the function calls in the same order. –  Ben Voigt Oct 19 '10 at 4:29
    
@Ben Voigt: never noticed that, however, looking above at John's comments, no remedy is suggested, other than parenthasis, which seems nullified by John's other answer... is there any remedy for this(free of mud slinging)? –  Necrolis Oct 19 '10 at 7:25
    
not sure there was much mud, other than that being slung in my direction... anyway: the remedy is given in the C FAQ entry that I pointed Jack towards. If you want a defined order of evaluation, you have to introduce sequence points yourself. Or, in English: you have to write it out the boring and obvious way, with multiple statements and temporary variables. –  John Marshall Oct 19 '10 at 18:56

I'd vote for the second one as well.

This question reminded me of something similar I do in one of my projects for form validation.

I pass in a reference to an empty string. With each condition I want to check, I either add a line of text to the string, or I don't. If after every test the string is still empty, then there were no errors, and I continue processing the form. Otherwise, I print the string as a message box (which describes the problems), and ask the user to fix the errors.

In this case I don't really care what the errors are, just that there are errors. Oh, and as a bonus, my validation code documents itself a bit because the errors that the user sees are right there.

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Use local variable if you need to reuse the result somewhere. Else, call and compare.

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int foo() {
    return function1() | function2() | function3();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
These answers with unspecified order of execution just keep coming. –  Ben Voigt Oct 19 '10 at 4:30
1  
You're right. I made a bad answer. I didn't think about the differences in order of execution between | and || –  nategoose Oct 19 '10 at 14:04

Yet another option: pass a pointer to the status variable to each function and have the function set it only if there is an error.

void function1(int *res)
{
    bool error_flag = false;
    // do work
    if (error_flag && (res != NULL)
    {
       *res = ERROR;
    }
}

// similar for function2, function3, ...

int foo()
{
    int res = OK;
    function1(&res);
    function2(&res);
    function3(&res);
    return res;
}
share|improve this answer

Since all 3 functions always have to get called first and only then you care about the result, I would go for the first solution, because the order of the statements reflects this. Seems more clear to me. Also, I generally don't like functions that do more than just return a value (i.e. that have side effects) in if-clauses, but that's a personal preference.

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This sounds like a job for the abundant Perl idiom "<try something> || die()".
int foo() {
     int retVal = 0;
          function1() != -1 || retval = -1;
          function2() != -1 || retval = -1;
          function3() != -1 || retval = -1;
          // ...
     return retVal;
}

share|improve this answer
    
The logic is backwards (you are setting retval to -1 iff the functions don't return -1). –  Ben Voigt Oct 19 '10 at 4:30
    
@Ben Voigt: Good catch. Edited and fixed. –  Eric Towers Oct 19 '10 at 12:11

I write it this way:

int foo()
{
    int iReturn = 0;

    int res1 = function1();
    if (res1 == -1)
    {
        return  iReturn; 
    }

    int res2 = function2();
    if (res2 == -1)
    {
        return  iReturn; 
    }

    int res3 = function3();
    if (res3 == -1)
    {
        return  iReturn; 
    }

    return res;
}

As a coding rule, you should declare your variables as close to the place where it is used.

It is good to use intermediate variable like your res1, res2, res3. But choose a good name so as you intent is clear when you get the value from the function.

And be careful, in the example you've given us, you never assigned the int res; that may be returned when success. The coding rule is to initialize your variable as soon as you can. So you should also initialize your res1 res2 res3 immidiatbly.

Returning an uninitialized value leads to undefined behaviour.

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I've seen code like this before which might be a little cleaner:

bool result = true;
result = function1() == -1 && result;
result = function2() == -1 && result;
result = function3() == -1 && result;
return result?-1:0;

Edit: forgot about short circuiting.

share|improve this answer
    
Stops calling the functions as soon as result is false due to short circuit eval. –  Eric Towers Oct 19 '10 at 12:13

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