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I am very interested in some studies or empirical data that shows a comparison of compilation times between two c++ projects that are the same except one uses forward declarations where possible and the other uses none.

How drastically can forward declarations change compilation time as compared to full includes?

#include "myClass.h"

vs.

class myClass;

Are there any studies that examine this?

I realize that this is a vague question that greatly depends on the project. I don't expect a hard number for an answer. Rather, I'm hoping someone may be able to direct me to a study about this.

The project I'm specifically worried about has about 1200 files. Each cpp on average has 5 headers included. Each header has on average 5 headers included. This regresses about 4 levels deep. It would seem that for each cpp compiled, around 300 headers must be opened and parsed, some many times. (There are many duplicates in the include tree.) There are guards, but the files are still opened. Each cpp is separately compiled with gcc, so there's no header caching.

To be sure no one misunderstands, I certainly advocate using forward declarations where possible. My employer, however, has banned them. I'm trying to argue against that position.

Thank you for any information.

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2  
@JoshD: Doesn't it depend on what does the header contain? If the header contains a 1000 class definitions of course it will compile much slower than a fwddecl. Even if it contains one class which is huuuuge, it will compile slower... It's a cliche, but I'd say "It depends" :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Oct 18 '10 at 19:45
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If the worst problem at your shop is the compile-time difference between forward declarations and not... where do you work and are they hiring?!? ;-) –  Chris Oct 18 '10 at 19:47
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Is there another exception for the pimpl idiom, too? Or is that banned? Compile times is one argument for using forward declarations where possible but it's not the first one I'd use. –  Charles Bailey Oct 18 '10 at 20:12
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It all depends on the definition of "slow," too. The last large C++ project on which I worked was on the order of 1 million SLOC (not including third party libraries). There was only one time that using a forward declaration improved compilation time and it was due to a quirk related to our use of Boost.Bimap (I still don't know what the problem was; that header just killed our compile times). We didn't use forward declarations much at all and the whole thing built in 10 minutes. Incremental rebuilds were on the order of seconds. –  James McNellis Oct 18 '10 at 20:22
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@JoshD: "There are guards, but the files are still opened. Each cpp is separately compiled with gcc". For what it's worth, GCC is supposed to be able to optimise this. It should recognise include guards, and doesn't re-pre-process the header if the guard would mean it does nothing. gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cppinternals/Guard-Macros.html. How are you confirming that the files really are opened for a second time, strace? Maybe your include guards are non-idiomatic, so that GCC doesn't recognise them. –  Steve Jessop Oct 18 '10 at 23:18
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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Forward declarations can make for neater more understandable code which HAS to be the goal of any decision surely.

Couple that with the fact that when it comes to classes its quite possible for 2 classes to rely upon each other which makes it a bit hard to NOT use forward declaration without causing a nightmare.

Equally forward declaration of classes in a header means that you only need to include the relevant headers in the CPPs that actually USE those classes. That actually DECREASES compile time.

Edit: Given your comment above I would point out it is ALWAYS slower to include a header file than to forward declare. Any time you include a header you are necessitating a load from disk often only to find out that the header guards mean that nothing happens. That would waste immense amounts of time and is really a VERY stupid rule to be bringing in.

Edit 2: Hard data is pretty hard to obtain. Anecdotally, I once worked on a project that wasn't strict about its header includes and the build time was roughly 45 minute on a 512MB RAM P3-500Mhz (This was a while back). After spending 2 weeks cutting down the include nightmare (By using forward declarations) I had managed to get the code to build in a little under 4 minutes. Subsequently using forward declarations became a rule whenever possible.

Edit 3: Its also worth bearing in mind that there is a huge advantage from using forward declarations when it comes to making small modifications to your code. If headers are included all over the shop then a modification to a header file can cause vast amounts of files to be rebuilt.

I also note lots of other people extolling the virtues of pre-compiled headers (PCHs). They have their place and they can really help but they really shouldn't be used as an alternative to proper forward declaration. Otherwise modifications to header files can cause issues with recompilation of lots of files (as mentioned above) as well as triggering a PCH rebuild. PCHs can provide a big win for things like libraries that are pre-built but they are no reason not to use proper forward declarations.

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5  
How do forward declarations make for neater code? I'd argue that they significantly obfuscate code and hide dependencies, making it far more difficult to understand code. –  James McNellis Oct 18 '10 at 19:46
    
@James: Well it depends on whether the forward declaration is just marking a function that is called later in the same file (in this case it can mean you can structure your code far more sensibly by grouping functions together that otherwise would have interdependency nightmares). That makes code neater, IMO. –  Goz Oct 18 '10 at 19:49
    
That last paragraph touches what I'm after. I expect the decrease to be quite significant, but I'd like some hard data to back that. I was hoping to obtain some rather than making my own. –  JoshD Oct 18 '10 at 19:49
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Any time you include a header you are necessitating a load from disk often only to find out that the header guards mean that nothing happens. Not true. If the header has already been loaded for that TU, chances are good it's in the OS-level filesystem cache; and even if not, compilers can recognize headers that use include guards and optimize that case. –  Roger Pate Oct 19 '10 at 6:32
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@James Forward declarations are cleaner because #includes are a box of chocolates - you never know what you're gonna git –  bobobobo Jul 21 '11 at 19:00
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Have a look in John Lakos's excellent Large Scale C++ Design book -- I think he has some figures for forward declaration by looking at what happens if you include N headers M levels deep.

If you don't use forward declarations, then aside from increasing the total build time from a clean source tree, it also vastly increases the incremental build time because header files are being included unnecessarily. Say you have 4 classes, A, B, C and D. C uses A and B in its implementation (ie in C.cpp) and D uses C in its implementation. The interface of D is forced to include C.h because of this 'no forward declaration' rule. Similarly C.h is forced to include A.h and B.h, so whenever A or B is changed, D.cpp has to be rebuilt even though it has no direct dependency. As the project scales up this means that if you touch any header it'll have a massive effect on causing huge amounts of code to be rebuilt that just doesn't need to be.

To have a rule that disallows forward declaration is (in my book) very bad practice indeed. It's going to waste huge amounts of time for the developers for no gain. The general rule of thumb should be that if the interface of class B depends on class A then it should include A.h, otherwise forward declare it. In practice 'depends on' means inherits from, uses as a member variable or 'uses any methods of'. The Pimpl idiom is a widespread and well understood method for hiding the implementation from the interface and allows you to vastly reduce the amount of rebuilding needed in your codebase.

If you can't find the figures from Lakos then I would suggest creating your own experiments and taking timings to prove to your management that this rule is absolutely wrong-headed.

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Note that Large Scale C++ Design was published in 1996. There have been huge improvements in compiler performance since then (most notably, I don't think precompiled headers were supported by most compilers in 1996). –  James McNellis Oct 18 '10 at 20:47
    
Thank you very much. This is quite helpful. –  JoshD Oct 18 '10 at 20:50
    
@James: yes, precompiled headers and multithreaded/parallelising compilers have moved on a long way, but also our company's codebase has also vastly increased in size since 1996. I think the core tenets of the book are as relevant today as they were back then. –  the_mandrill Oct 18 '10 at 20:55
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Uhmm, the question is so unclear. And it depends, to be simple.

In an arbitrary scenario i think translation units will not become shorter and easier to compile. The most regarded intent of forward-declarations is to provide convinience to the programmer.

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#include "myClass.h"

is 1..n lines

class myClass;

is 1 line.

You will save time unless all your headers are 1 liners. As there is no impact on the compilation itself (forward reference is just way to say to the compiler that a specific symbol will be defined at link time, and will be possible only if the compiler doesnt need data from that symbol (data size for example)), the reading time of the files included will be saved everytime you replace one by forward references. There's not a regular measure for this as it is a per project value, but it is a recommended practice for large c++ projects (See Large-Scale C++ Software Design / John Lakos for more info about tricks to manage large projects in c++ even if some of them are dated)

Another way to limit the time passed by the compiler on headers is pre-compiled headers.

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There is only a very loose relationship between LOC and time to compile. Very, very loose. –  Roger Pate Oct 19 '10 at 6:35
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You've asked a very general question that's elicited some very good general answers. But your question wasn't about your actual problem:

To be sure no one misunderstands, I certainly advocate using forward declarations where possible. My employer, however, has banned them. I'm trying to argue against that position.

We have some information on the project, but not enough:

The project I'm specifically worried about has about 1200 files. Each cpp on average has 5 headers included. Each header has on average 5 headers included. This regresses about 4 levels deep. It would seem that for each cpp compiled, around 300 headers must be opened and parsed, some many times. (There are many duplicates in the include tree.) There are guards, but the files are still opened. Each cpp is separately compiled with gcc, so there's no header caching.

What have you done towards using gcc's precompiled headers? What difference does it make in compile times?

How long does it take to compile a clean build now? How long are your typical (non-clean/incremental) builds? If, as in James McNellis' example in comments, build times are under a minute:

The last large C++ project on which I worked was on the order of 1 million SLOC (not including third party libraries). ... We didn't use forward declarations much at all and the whole thing built in 10 minutes. Incremental rebuilds were on the order of seconds.

Then it doesn't really matter how much time would be saved by avoiding includes: shaving seconds off builds surely won't matter for many projects.

Take a small representative portion of your project and convert it to what you'd like it to be. Measure the differences in compilation time between the unconverted and the converted versions of that sample. Remember to touch (or the equivalent of make --assume-new) various sets of files to represent real builds you'd encounter while working.

Show your employer how you'd be more productive.

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Thank you very much for your informative response. –  JoshD Oct 20 '10 at 16:49
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