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I am using the following code to set the cr0 bit to disable cache. When I compile this

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
        __asm__("pushl  %eax\n\t"
                "mov    %cr0,%eax;\n\t"
                "orl    $(1 << 30),%eax;\n\t"
                "mov    %eax,%cr0;\n\t"
                "wbinvd\n\t"
                "popl   %eax"
);

        return 0;
}

I am getting error saying that the operands are invalid for mov.

Can anyone please point me to a good gcc x86-64 guide for doing these kinds of things? Also what exactly is wrong with the above code?

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Does it work if you assemble it outside of embedded assembly (make an assembly file and assemble it using gas or nasm)? –  Jonathan Oct 18 '10 at 20:17
    
Useful SO question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1108485/disable-l2-l1-caches –  Zan Lynx Oct 18 '10 at 21:00
    
Why do you want to do this? what are you trying to accomplish? –  Hasturkun Oct 18 '10 at 21:25
    
I am testing the speedup because of cache in the cpu. –  sanatana Oct 18 '10 at 21:56
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ok, so finally I wrote the following kernel module. Am not sure it is right, since I don't observe the drastic slowdown which should accompany when you disable cache. But this compiles and inserts properly.

Any pointers will be helpful.

Thanks!

#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/module.h>
MODULE_LICENSE("Dual BSD/GPL");
static int hello_init(void)
{
        printk(KERN_ALERT "Hello, world\n");
        __asm__("push   %rax\n\t"
                "mov    %cr0,%rax;\n\t"
                "or     $(1 << 30),%rax;\n\t"
                "mov    %rax,%cr0;\n\t"
                "wbinvd\n\t"
                "pop    %rax"
);
        return 0;
}
static void hello_exit(void)
{
        printk(KERN_ALERT "Goodbye, cruel world\n");
        __asm__("push   %rax\n\t"
                "mov    %cr0,%rax;\n\t"
                "and     $~(1 << 30),%rax;\n\t"
                "mov    %rax,%cr0;\n\t"
                "wbinvd\n\t"
                "pop    %rax"
);
}
module_init(hello_init);
module_exit(hello_exit);
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Ok. I just confirmed that this works. You also need to disable the MTRR registers by $ echo "disable=00" >| /proc/mtrr –  sanatana Oct 19 '10 at 16:37
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You cannot do operations like this from user code and even running as root is user code.

You will need to make this into a driver module and load it using insmod.

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Ok, I will try this by writing it as a module! Thanks Zan. –  sanatana Oct 18 '10 at 20:52
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I think you don't see the "drastic slowdown" because you have multiple cores, right? I made some experiments and it seems to me that setting CD in %cr0 only affects the processor your are running the module on.

Make sure that you run your code on all cores where you want to disable caching. You could, for example, create a /proc/cachedisable file where a read triggers your code. Then use

taskset -c cpu_number cat /proc/cachedisable

to disable the caches on CPU cpu_number. Do the same with /proc/cacheenable and you have everything you need. This works for me and there is no need to alter the MTRRs, which is pretty complicated. If you have multiple processors then you can disable caching on only one of them and perform your experiments on this cpu. Then the rest of the system remains usable.

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Try this: "mov %%cr0, %%eax \n"

A simple % is interpreted as user argument (I think).

You should read this

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asm ("mov %%cr0,%%rax;"); This says Error: bad register name `%%cr0' –  sanatana Oct 18 '10 at 20:22
    
from the link: There are two %’s prefixed to the register name. This helps GCC to distinguish between the operands and registers. operands have a single % as prefix. –  sanatana Oct 18 '10 at 20:24
    
Are you sure that it is still cr0 the name of the register in 64bit ? The code that I've pasted is from a minikernel that I wrote. –  Thomas Oct 18 '10 at 20:26
    
Yes, cr0 is the name for control register on x86/x86-64 processors. It is the registers that has changed. Do I need to enter protected mode to access cr0? I am running this exec as root. –  sanatana Oct 18 '10 at 20:29
    
Yes, it is a protected instruction (fortunately :)) –  Thomas Oct 18 '10 at 20:34
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The code compiles OK for me on 32-bit x86 bit not on x86-64 - this is with gcc 4.2.1 on Mac OS X:

$ gcc -Wall -m32 cr0.c -o cr0
$

No errors or warnings.

$ gcc -Wall -m64 cr0.c -o cr0
/var/folders/.../cce0FYAB.s:9:suffix or operands invalid for `push'
/var/folders/.../cce0FYAB.s:10:suffix or operands invalid for `mov'
/var/folders/.../cce0FYAB.s:12:suffix or operands invalid for `mov'
/var/folders/.../cce0FYAB.s:14:suffix or operands invalid for `pop'
$

So I guess there are deeper issues than just the mov %eax,%cr0 instruction here with asm on x86-64.

Looking at the x86-64 ISA it seems that you probably need something like this for x86-64:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
        __asm__("pushq  %rax\n\t"
                "movq    %cr0,%rax\n\t"
                "orl    $(1 << 30),%eax\n\t"
                "movq    %rax,%cr0\n\t"
                "wbinvd\n\t"
                "popq   %rax"
);

        return 0;
}

I don't know if this works but it at least compiles/assembles OK:

$ gcc -Wall -m64 cr0.c -o cr0
$ 
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the problem is with compiling on x86-64. I used %rax instead of %eax. It compiles fine but seg faults when I run it. –  sanatana Oct 18 '10 at 20:48
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