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Given an arbitrary number, how can I process each digit of the number individually?

Edit I've added a basic example of the kind of thing Foo might do.

For example, in C# I might do something like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int number = 1234567890;
    string numberAsString = number.ToString();

    foreach(char x in numberAsString)
    {
        string y = x.ToString();
        int z = int.Parse(y);
        Foo(z);
    }
}

void Foo(int n)
{
    Console.WriteLine(n*n);
}
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1  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2838727/… –  KennyTM Oct 18 '10 at 21:01
1  
Why don't you just use show? –  FUZxxl Oct 19 '10 at 5:48
    
@FUZxxl because I want to work with each digit in turn as a number –  Greg B Oct 20 '10 at 7:39
    
Something like showNumbers = show >=> return? –  FUZxxl Oct 21 '10 at 0:53
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7 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Have you heard of div and mod?

You'll probably want to reverse the list of numbers if you want to treat the most significant digit first. Converting the number into a string is an impaired way of doing things.

135 `div` 10 = 13
135 `mod` 10 = 5

Generalize into a function:

digs :: Integral x => x -> [x]
digs 0 = []
digs x = digs (x `div` 10) ++ [x `mod` 10]

Or in reverse:

digs :: Integral x => x -> [x]
digs 0 = []
digs x = x `mod` 10 : digs (x `div` 10)

This treats 0 as having no digits. A simple wrapper function can deal with that special case if you want to.

Note that this solution does not work for negative numbers (the input x must be integral, i.e. a whole number).

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Care to give me an example? –  Greg B Oct 18 '10 at 21:01
1  
quotRem. –  KennyTM Oct 18 '10 at 21:02
    
I've added an example to my code as I don't see how div and mod will help me walk over the digits of any arbitrary number. Could you expand on your thoughts please. –  Greg B Oct 18 '10 at 21:05
    
@Greg B this is a haskell source code that does the exact same thing your algorithm does, but using @supercooldave algorithm => pastie.org/1231091 –  Roman Gonzalez Oct 18 '10 at 21:37
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You could also just reuse digits from Hackage.

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digits :: Integer -> [Int]
digits = map (read . (:[])) . show

or you can return it into []:

digits :: Integer -> [Int]
digits = map (read . return) . show

or, with Data.Char.digitToInt:

digits :: Integer -> [Int]
digits = map digitToInt . show

the same as Daniel's really, but pointless and uses Int, because a digit shouldn't really exceed maxBound :: Int.

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maybe (digits = map (read . return) . show) ? or (read . pure).. –  Ed'ka Oct 19 '10 at 20:36
    
the digitToInt version is probably better anyway, and :[] was slightly more obvious to me. eh, I'll edit it in. I have no idea where pure is from, so. –  sreservoir Oct 19 '10 at 22:00
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You can use

digits = map (`mod` 10) . reverse . takeWhile (> 0) . iterate (`div` 10)

or for reverse order

rev_digits = map (`mod` 10) . takeWhile (> 0) . iterate (`div` 10)

The iterate part generates an infinite list dividing the argument in every step by 10, so 12345 becomes [12345,1234,123,12,1,0,0..]. The takeWhile part takes only the interesting non-null part of the list. Then we reverse (if we want to) and take the last digit of each number of the list.

I used point-free style here, so you can imagine an invisible argument n on both sides of the "equation". However, if you want to write it that way, you have to substitute the top level . by $:

digits n = map(`mod` 10) $ reverse $ takeWhile (> 0) $ iterate (`div`10) n
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Using the same technique used in your post, you can do:

digits :: Integer -> [Int]
digits n = map (\x -> read [x] :: Int) (show n)

See it in action:

Prelude> digits 123
[1,2,3]

Does that help?

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4  
digits = map (read . (:[])) . show –  sreservoir Oct 18 '10 at 22:47
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Textbook unfold

import qualified Data.List as L
digits = reverse . L.unfoldr (\x -> if x == 0 then Nothing else Just (mod x 10, div x 10))
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Yet another way:

digits n = if q == 0 then [r] else digits q ++ [r]
  where (q, r) = n `divMod` 10
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