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In a stored procedure in SQL Server 2008, I need to parse strings like "12M" and return 12 * 30 days as an int. So, I am basically parsing and calculating the number of days the string represents.

I am not sure how this can be done.

I am thinking to do a while loop over each character in the string. Any suggestion?

Edit (not author): It appears the goal is to convert "xM" to "x Months in days" (30 days/month), "yY" to "y Years in days" (365days/year), and "zD" to "z Days" (no transformation).

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More examples would be nice -- will it always be a single letter indicating the number of days? –  OMG Ponies Oct 19 '10 at 3:04
    
Yes, it could be 'Y', 'D' or 'M'. However, the digits part will be any digits. Eg: 100M, 10000M, 1D, 34D, 2343M. –  Student T Oct 19 '10 at 3:05
    
I will question why you need to do this in SQL. This is done much easier in your application code. Is there any specific reason why you need to do this in SQL? –  InSane Oct 19 '10 at 3:09
    
Convince my manager. I am asked to do it. I have no control over it. –  Student T Oct 19 '10 at 3:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use:

DECLARE val INT

SET val = CASE UPPER(RIGHT(column, 1))
            WHEN 'Y' THEN
              CAST(SUBSTRING(column, 1, LEN(column)-1) AS INT) * 365
            WHEN 'M' THEN
              CAST(SUBSTRING(column, 1, LEN(column)-1) AS INT) * 30
            WHEN 'D' THEN
              CAST(SUBSTRING(column, 1, LEN(column)-1) AS INT) * 1
          END

For testing:

WITH sample AS (
  SELECT '12M' AS [column]
  UNION ALL
  SELECT '100M'
  UNION ALL
  SELECT '10000M'  
  UNION ALL
  SELECT '1D'
  UNION ALL
  SELECT '34D'
  UNION ALL
  SELECT '2343M' )
SELECT s.[column],
       CASE UPPER(RIGHT(s.[column], 1))
         WHEN 'Y' THEN
           CAST(SUBSTRING(s.[column], 1, LEN(s.[column])-1) AS INT) * 365
         WHEN 'M' THEN
           CAST(SUBSTRING(s.[column], 1, LEN(s.[column])-1) AS INT) * 30
         WHEN 'D' THEN
           CAST(SUBSTRING(s.[column], 1, LEN(s.[column])-1) AS INT) * 1
       END
  FROM sample s

Returns:

col      result
-----------------
12M      360
100M     3000
10000M   300000
1D       1
34D      34
2343M    70290

Addendum

These values should be stored separately, as two columns:

  • value INT
  • value_type CHAR(1) (D, M, Y)
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Yes, do NOT do it in SQL. Put in a .NET based stored procedure for that stuff - you will love being able to properly debug it easily, test it and have access ot the date manupulation classes.

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I agree, but this is a case where "I don't care how you do it, just do it". I was asked to use stored procedure, no question, just do it. –  Student T Oct 19 '10 at 3:42

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