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Out of these not None tests.

if val != None:

if not (val is None):

if val is not None:

Which one is preferable, and why?

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marked as duplicate by orokusaki, Jon Clements Aug 20 at 21:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
See [ Is there any difference between “foo is None” and “foo == None”? ](stackoverflow.com/questions/26595/…) for the difference between is and ==. [ Python if x is not None or if not x is None? ](stackoverflow.com/questions/2710940/…) shows that the last two are equivalent. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 19 '10 at 3:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 254 down vote accepted
if val is not None:
    # ...

is the Pythonic idiom for testing that a variable is not set to None. This idiom has particular uses in the case of declaring keyword functions with default parameters. is tests identity in Python. Because there is one and only one instance of None present in a running Python script/program, is is the optimal test for this. As Johnsyweb points out, this is discussed in PEP 8 under "Programming Recommendations".

As for why this is preferred to

if not (val is None):
    # ...

this is simply part of the Zen of Python: "Readability counts." Good Python is often close to good pseudocode.

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19  
also, "is not" has special semeantics created for this purpose (it's not a logical consequence of how expressions are constructed; "1 is (not None)" and "1 is not None" have two different outcomes. –  Ivo van der Wijk Mar 26 '12 at 11:03
6  
+1: I liked this reference - "Good Python is often close to good pseudocode" –  legesh Mar 29 '12 at 8:38
1  
"not None" returns True. Interesting. –  Ries Jun 14 '13 at 13:18
    
@gotgenes Not always right. Eg: var = ''. If you run this code, it tests successfully for None. Hence, you are not able to test if the variable was set to None or an empty string. –  Ethan Aug 30 '13 at 1:02
    
@Ethan val = ''; print(val is not None) prints True, so what part do you find incorrect? –  gotgenes Aug 30 '13 at 15:46

From, Programming Recommendations, PEP 8:

Comparisons to singletons like None should always be done with 'is' or 'is not', never the equality operators.

Also, beware of writing "if x" when you really mean "if x is not None" -- e.g. when testing whether a variable or argument that defaults to None was set to some other value. The other value might have a type (such as a container) that could be false in a boolean context!

PEP 8 is essential reading for any Python programmer.

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1  
+1 for the "essential reading" -- didn't know about that –  user2314737 Sep 25 at 13:09

Either of the latter two, since val could potentially be of a type that defines __eq__() to return true when passed None.

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4  
That's rather dastardly __eq__() behavior, and something I hadn't considered. Good answer for catching a corner case. –  gotgenes Oct 19 '10 at 3:37

The best bet with these types of questions is to see exactly what python does. The dis module is incredibly informative:

>>> def f(val):
...   if val != None:
...     return True
...   return False
...
>>> def g(val):
...   if not (val is None):
...     return True
...   return False
...
>>> def h(val):
...   if val is not None:
...     return True
...   return False
...
>>> import dis
>>> dis.dis(f)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (val)
              3 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
              6 COMPARE_OP               3 (!=)
              9 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       16

  3          12 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (True)
             15 RETURN_VALUE

  4     >>   16 LOAD_GLOBAL              2 (False)
             19 RETURN_VALUE
>>> dis.dis(g)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (val)
              3 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
              6 COMPARE_OP               9 (is not)
              9 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       16

  3          12 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (True)
             15 RETURN_VALUE

  4     >>   16 LOAD_GLOBAL              2 (False)
             19 RETURN_VALUE
>>> dis.dis(h)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (val)
              3 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
              6 COMPARE_OP               9 (is not)
              9 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       16

  3          12 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (True)
             15 RETURN_VALUE

  4     >>   16 LOAD_GLOBAL              2 (False)
             19 RETURN_VALUE

Note that the last two cases reduce to the same sequence of operations (python reads not (val is None) and uses the is not operator). The first uses the != operator when comparing with None.

As pointed out by other answers, using != when comparing with None is a bad idea

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