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I am getting a list of file names using the following code:

        //Set up Datatable
        dtUpgradeFileInfo.Columns.Add("BaseFW");
        dtUpgradeFileInfo.Columns.Add("ActiveFW");
        dtUpgradeFileInfo.Columns.Add("UpgradeFW");
        dtUpgradeFileInfo.Columns.Add("FileName");

        //Gets Upgrade information and upgrade Files from Upgrade Folder
        DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(g_strAppPath + "\\Update Files");
        FileInfo[] rgFiles = di.GetFiles("*.txt");
        foreach (FileInfo fi in rgFiles)
        {
            test1 = fi.Name.ToString();


        }

All file names will be in the form BXXXX_AXXXX_UXXXX. Where of course the Xs represent a number 0-9, and i need those 3 grouping of just numbers to put each into their respective column in the Datatable. I was initially intending to get the characters that represent each grouping and putting them together for each grouping but i'm wondering if there is a better way/quicker way than sending it to a charArray. Any suggestions?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a relatively simple way to get the numbers out of test1 (without LINQ):

...
string test1 = fi.Name.ToString();

int baseFW=0;
int activeFW=0;
int upgradeFW=0;

// Break the file name into the three groups
string[] groups=test1.Split('_');

if (groups.Length==3)
{
  // Create a numbers array to hold the numbers
  int[] nums=new int[groups.Length];

  // Parse the numbers out of the strings
  int idx=0;
  foreach (string s in groups)
    nums[idx++]=int.Parse(s.Remove(0,1)); // Convert to num 

  baseFW=nums[0];
  activeFW=nums[1];
  upgradeFW=nums[2];
}
else
{
  // Error handling...
}

If you want to do this using LINQ, it's even easier:

...
string test1 = fi.Name.ToString();

int baseFW=0;
int activeFW=0;
int upgradeFW=0;

// Extract all numbers
int[] nums=test1.Split('_') // Split on underscores
                .Select(s => int.Parse(s.Remove(0,1))) // Convert to ints
                .ToArray(); // For random access, below

if (nums.Length==3)
{
  baseFW=nums[0];
  activeFW=nums[1];
  upgradeFW=nums[2];
}
else
{
   // Error handling...
}
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Using regular expressions allows you to easily parse out the values that you need, and has the added benefit of allowing you to skip over files that end up in the directory that don't match the expected filename format.

Your code would look something like this:

        //Gets Upgrade information and upgrade Files from Upgrade Folder 
        string strRegex = @"^B(?<Base>[0-9]{4})_A(?<Active>[0-9]{4})_U(?<Upgrade>[0-9]{4}).txt$";
        RegexOptions myRegexOptions = RegexOptions.ExplicitCapture | RegexOptions.Compiled;
        Regex myRegex = new Regex(strRegex, myRegexOptions);

        DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(g_strAppPath + "\\Update Files");
        FileInfo[] rgFiles = di.GetFiles("*.txt");
        foreach (FileInfo fi in rgFiles)
        {
            string name = fi.Name.ToString();
            Match matched = myRegex.Match(name);
            if (matched.Success)
            {
                //do the inserts into the data table here
                string baseFw = matched.Groups["Base"].Value;
                string activeFw = matched.Groups["Active"].Value;
                string upgradeFw = matched.Groups["Upgrade"].Value;
            }
        }
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1  
RegEx is definitly a good way to do this, and leaves an opening for expending the solution to many more complicated problems without much effort. The only shame is that MS made the use of Regex a bit more complicated then other solutions. –  Neowizard Oct 19 '10 at 9:28
    
It is also inefficient if the input is of a fixed form. Performance wise, String.Split should be used in preference to reg-ex. –  Michael Goldshteyn Oct 19 '10 at 14:04
    
@Michael Goldshteyn, it depends on what you are optimizing for. A well crafted hand coded parsing routine will generally be able to outperform a regex from a CPU cycle standpoint. However, unless you're going to be processing thousands of items, the performance difference is probably irrelevant. The RegEx approach has the added benefit of validating conformance of the file names with the expected pattern (someone dropping a readme_before_running.txt in the directory will cause an error with other approaches). Plus it can be easier to adjust to support additional valid formats. –  Reed Rector Oct 20 '10 at 4:32
    
Quick other comment on the use of RegexOptions.Compiled in the above code. Really should not be doing this in the body of a method as implied by the code. The overhead of compiling the RegEx is high, so should only be done when the RegEx object is kept around for repeated use (i.e. storing it in a static field of the class). If using the above verbatim, probably better to not include the Copiled option. –  Reed Rector Oct 20 '10 at 4:35

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