Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically the data structure I want would mirror a MSMQ but would be in memory, because it is being used in the one process. By mirroring MSMQ I mean you would enqueue objects, then you could either dequeue objects or retrieve them using a key. Here is me initial attempt. My main problem with this attempt is that the Get by id would be used frequently and therefore the queue would end up having a lot of "dead" objects in it.

public class QueueDictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    private readonly Queue _queue = new Queue();
    private readonly Dictionary<TKey, TValue> _dictionary = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    private readonly object _syncRoot = new object();

    public TValue Dequeue()
    {
        lock (_syncRoot)
        {
            TKey key = (TKey)_queue.Dequeue();
            while (!_dictionary.ContainsKey(key))
                key = (TKey)_queue.Dequeue();
            return _dictionary[key];
        }
    }

    public TValue Get(TKey key)
    {
        lock (_syncRoot)
        {
            TValue result = _dictionary[key];
            _dictionary.Remove(key);
            return result;
        }
    }

    public void Enqueue(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        lock (_syncRoot)
        {
            _dictionary.Add(key, value);
            _queue.Enqueue(key);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
"the queue would end up having a lot of "dead" objects in it" - then it wouldn't be much of a queue.... –  Mitch Wheat Oct 19 '10 at 5:23
    
Why would you get "dead" objects? You don't seem to remove anything in Get... And if you aren't cheating that, you don't seem to need the while loop... which btw should probably protect itself from an empty queue. –  Marc Gravell Oct 19 '10 at 5:24
    
@Marc - I think the Get method is what the OP is asking for help with since you can't remove an arbitrary item from the queue. –  Josh Oct 19 '10 at 5:25
    
So is the intent that Get removes objects from the queue? Or is that simply a "peek" interface? –  Marc Gravell Oct 19 '10 at 5:26
    
Good question - I assume he wants to be able to remove an item by key from the queue. –  Josh Oct 19 '10 at 5:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Rather than using a Queue internally, you could use a LinkedList. Then in the Dictionary you can store the Key and the LinkedListNode. Then when you remove the item from the Dictionary, you can unlink the LinkedListNode from the linked list. Of course you loose the locality of the Queue, but gain the performance of the random access.

Here is a quick and dirty example, not tested so excuse any errors and no error checking. For example you should check if the queue is empty, make sure an item with the same key is not already in the dictionary etc.

public class QueueDictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
  private readonly LinkedList<Tuple<TKey, TValue>> _queue =
    new LinkedList<Tuple<TKey, TValue>>();

  private readonly Dictionary<TKey, LinkedListNode<Tuple<TKey, TValue>>> 
    _dictionary = new Dictionary<TKey, LinkedListNode<Tuple<TKey, TValue>>>();

  private readonly object _syncRoot = new object();

  public TValue Dequeue()
  {
    lock (_syncRoot)
    {
      Tuple<TKey, TValue> item = _queue.First();
      _queue.RemoveFirst();
      _dictionary.Remove(item.Item1);
      return item.Item2;
    }
  }

  public TValue Dequeue(TKey key)
  {
    lock (_syncRoot)
    {
      LinkedListNode<Tuple<TKey, TValue>> node = _dictionary[key];
      _dictionary.Remove(key);
      _queue.Remove(node);
      return node.Value.Item2;
    }
  }

  public void Enqueue(TKey key, TValue value)
  {
    lock (_syncRoot)
    {
      LinkedListNode<Tuple<TKey, TValue>> node = 
        _queue.AddLast(new Tuple<TKey, TValue>(key, value));
      _dictionary.Add(key, node);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That will work well I think. I would also want "_dictionary.Remove(key);" in the Dequeue(TKey key) method. –  Tim Carter Oct 19 '10 at 6:05

Well your object can act like a queue without actually using the Queue class as its internal storage. Depending on how many items you plan on keeping, it might be easier just to maintain a single LinkedList(T) instead of storing the item in both a LinkedList(T) and a Dictionary(K,V).

But basically, instead of using a Queue internally, you could use a LinkedList(T) and just add new items to the end of the list and dequeue from the front of the list. When you need to find one by key, you can just scan the list for the matching key or if the number of items makes this perform poorly, you could double up your storage with a Dictionary(K, LinkedListNode(T)) and use the dictionary for your key lookups.

share|improve this answer

What if you used a double-linked list to act as the Queue and that way you can have full control of the Enqueue, Dequeue, and specially the Get method. So in the Get method you can simply remove the key from the double-linked list.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.