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Sorry, I just found the

id = [conn.cursor() for x in range(100) ]

also works, so my concern will not be a problem anymore. Thanks for all of your answer, all of you are really fast.


All,

id = [(conn.cursor(),x) for x in range(100) ]
>>> id
[(<sqlite3.Cursor object at 0x01D14DA0>, 0), (<sqlite3.Cursor object at 0x01D14DD0>, 1), (<sqlite3.Cursor object at 0x01D14E00>, 2), (<sqlite3.Cursor object at 0x01D14E30>, 3), (<sqlite3.Cursor object at 0x01D14EC0>, 4), (<sqlite3.Cursor object at 0x01D14EF0>, 5),     <omitted>

but I do not need the id[1] col actually, and I do not want use the

for x in range(100):
    id.append(conn.cursor())

for some reason, do you think I can use the list comprehension to get what I want? Also similiar question, if I want to invoke one function 100 times.

def foo():
    pass

for x in range(100):
    foo()

Can that "for" be rewrite to a list comprehensions style either?

Thanks!

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2  
You may want to avoid the name id as it is a built-in function. –  kennytm Oct 19 '10 at 7:52
    
thanks for point this out –  user478514 Oct 19 '10 at 8:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For the second question

List comprehensions are used for generating another list as output of iteration over other list or lists. Since you want to run foo a numer of times, it is more elegant and less confusing to use for .. in range(..) loop.

If you are interested in collating the return value of foo, then you should use list comprehension else for loop is good. At least I would write it that way.

See the example below:

>>> [x for x in range(10)]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> def foo(): print 'foo'
... 
>>> 
>>> [foo() for x in range(10)]
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None]
>>> 

[Edit: As per request]

The iter version that was provided by eumiro.

>>> results = ( foo() for _ in xrange(10) )
>>> results
<generator object <genexpr> at 0x10041f960>
>>> list(results)
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None]
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
I recalled there is an iter version of the result collection, can you also mark it here? –  user478514 Oct 19 '10 at 8:07
    
@user478514: I have provided the example. –  pyfunc Oct 19 '10 at 8:11
    
thanks, just want to know a little more, why (x for x in range(10)) return a generator? how it can be coded, I means how python know the () should return a generator not a tuple? –  user478514 Oct 19 '10 at 8:16
    
@user478514: Rather than repeat the answer here :) Read the SO at stackoverflow.com/questions/47789/… –  pyfunc Oct 19 '10 at 8:36

You don't have to use the variable you are iterating over in your list iteration. This will work just fine:

id = [conn.cursor() for _ in range(100)]
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1.

cursors = [ conn.cursor() for _ in xrange(100) ]

2.

results = [ foo() for _ in xrange(100) ]
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