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I been trying to solve this one for a while and can't seem to make it work right.. here is my current work

while True:

    guess = int(raw_input('What is your number?'))

    if 100 < guess or guess < 1:
        print '\ninvalid'

    else:
        .....continue on

Right now I have made it so when a user input a number higher than 100 or lower than 1, it prints out "invalid". BUT what if i want to make it so when a user input a string that is not a number(alphabetic, punctuation, etc.) it also returns this "invalid" message?

I have thought about using if not ...isdigit(), but it won't work since I get the guess as an integer in order for the above range to work. Try/except is another option I thought about, but still haven't figured out how to implement it in correctly.

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2  
You can also do if 1 <= guess <= 100: –  Daenyth Oct 19 '10 at 16:28

2 Answers 2

You can use exception handling:

try:
    guess = int(raw_input('What is your number?'))
    if not (1 <= guess <= 100):
        raise ValueError
    # .....continue on
except ValueError:
    print '\ninvalid'

That way, \ninvalid will be printed if the user either inputs a non-numeric string or inputs a numeric string greater than 100 or smaller than 1.

EDIT: Okay, I submit to the x < y < z syntax. Still think it loses some of its charm when it's used with not, though.

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1  
wow thank you Frederic your code seems much more simpler. Though i have never learn what "raise" is in python, under what circumstances can you use it? and how does it benefit? thank you! and thank you to all who contributed –  neogeo Oct 19 '10 at 9:49
    
@neogeo, raise allows you to throw exceptions yourself (see http://python.about.com/od/gettingstarted/ss/begpyexceptions_7.htm). In your case, int() raises ValueError if the value passed is not numeric. If we extend that behavior by also raising ValueError if the value is numeric but outside our domain, we can handle the two error cases in the same place at the same time. –  Frédéric Hamidi Oct 19 '10 at 9:55
while True:
  try:
    guess = int(raw_input("..."))
  except EOFError:
    print "whoa nelly! EOF? we should probably exit"
    break  # or sys.exit, or raise a different exception,
    # or don't catch this at all, and let it percolate up,
    # depending on what you want
  except ValueError:
    print "illegal input: expected an integer"
  else:
    if not (1 <= guess <= 100):
      print "out of range"
    else:
      print "processing guess... (but if it wasn't 42, then it's wrong)"
      break  # out of while loop after processing
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+1 for putting a minimal number of lines between try and except, and also for using the 1 <= guess <= 100 syntax. –  EOL Oct 19 '10 at 12:22
    
I like Fred's lack of duplication, but there are more Pythonic bits in this. (x < y < z, and bonus else: clauses.) –  Nick T Oct 19 '10 at 15:04
    
@Nick: Often you'll handle illegal input (i.e. not a number) differently from invalid input (i.e. out of range), even if only to tell the user more information. Once that happens, there's no duplication. (Caveat emptor: That distinction in "illegal"/"invalid" as terms isn't important, I didn't even follow it originally above, and I don't know anyone that assumes the distinction unless specified. However, you can find the same idea in technical/standardese specs.) –  Roger Pate Oct 19 '10 at 15:09

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