Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have made a mistake when designing my application database several years ago and collation settings of my tables and table fields are mixed. Some of them are utf8_general_ci and some of them are utf8_unicode_ci.

This causes problems when joining tables with different collations. Now, I am planning to change collation settings and make them the same: utf8_unicode_ci. I will be running these two SQL queries on all my tables.

ALTER TABLE  `table1` DEFAULT CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;
ALTER TABLE  `table1` CHANGE  `Action`  `Action` VARCHAR( 250 ) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL;

My question is, does running these two SQL queries break any field values, especially the ones which contains accented characters? Or is it safe to run these two queries?

Looking forward to hear from you.

Thanks for your answers!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

please refer mysql doc which talks about changing character set and collation

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/charset-column.html

Its saying that - "If you use ALTER TABLE to convert a column from one character set to another, MySQL attempts to map the data values, but if the character sets are incompatible, there may be data loss."

--Cheers

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your kind answer. –  TamTam Oct 19 '10 at 11:42
1  
These two character encodings are compatible, though. In fact, it is the exact same character encoding, just a different way of comparing them when sorting. Any indexes on the columns would probably need to get rebuilt, that's about it. –  thomasrutter Mar 20 '12 at 22:42

Collation only affects how strings within a field are compared, not how they're stored. As far as you stay with utf8 encoding, you're safe.

share|improve this answer
1  
yup, this is correct. There are subtle sorting and comparison differences like german ß= ss and others, but no data will be changed. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/charset-unicode-sets.html for details –  Pekka 웃 Oct 19 '10 at 11:34
1  
Guys, please check this out (dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/charset-column.html) as Koteswasa mentions below. Thanks for your time. –  TamTam Oct 19 '10 at 11:43
    
I stand corrected. Still within same encoding, switching collation is safe. –  Mchl Oct 19 '10 at 12:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.