Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
private ArrayList<HashMap<String, String>> sortArrayMap(ArrayList arrList)
    {
        ArrayList retArray = new ArrayList();
        Hashtable tableUnOrdered = new Hashtable();

        for (int i = 0; i < arrList.size(); i++)
        {
            HashMap<String, String> map = (HashMap<String, String>) arrList.get(i);
            tableUnOrdered.put(map.get("TCNT"), i);
        }
        Vector v = new Vector(tableUnOrdered.keySet());
        Collections.sort(v);
        for (int j = 0; j < MAX_ITEMS_PER_GRAPH && j < v.size(); j++)
            retArray.add(v.get(j)); // add the list in the needed order

        return retArray;
    }

I am not able to find out where memory leakage is happening in this code, can anyone let me know on this. My boss said this code has memory leakage and asked me to find out.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "memory leakage"? What's the symptoms? –  Nikita Rybak Oct 19 '10 at 11:59
    
I think, there is no memory leak in this code. Why do You think there is ? Please send results from "jstat -gcutil" . Of course everybody knows that Java is one big memory leak ;-) I think problem is with heap size. –  iddqd Oct 19 '10 at 12:08
    
Sort array map? Why not use TreeMap? –  Buhake Sindi Oct 19 '10 at 12:39
    
It's not a leak; but you could substitue the Vector and Hashtable to a ArrayList and HashMap : they are both unsynchronized and probably a bit faster. –  KarlP Oct 19 '10 at 12:42
1  
retArray is a new array(list). The original array is the one passed as an argument. It's possible to sort that directly, using a custom comparator that would compare two maps ( using the TCNT entry in each map.) –  KarlP Oct 19 '10 at 12:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's broken: I cleaned up the generics, and it's not returning a list of HashMaps, its returning a list of strings.

private ArrayList<HashMap<String, String>> sortArrayMap2(ArrayList<HashMap<String, String>>  arrList)
{
    ArrayList<HashMap<String, String>> retArray = new ArrayList<HashMap<String, String>>();
    HashMap<String, Integer> tableUnOrdered = new HashMap<String,Integer>();

    for (int i = 0; i < arrList.size(); i++)
    {
        HashMap<String, String> map = arrList.get(i);

        tableUnOrdered.put(map.get("TCNT"), i);
    }
    Vector<String> v = new Vector<String>(tableUnOrdered.keySet());
    Collections.sort(v);
    for (int j = 0; j < MAX_ITEMS_PER_GRAPH && j < v.size(); j++)
        retArray.add(v.get(j)); // add the list in the needed order

    return retArray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thats a great help from your side... few questions alone 1. what is TCNT and where is custom comparator and is this code broken and what is the advantage of this from previous code. –  John Oct 19 '10 at 13:27
    
can u help me in this code also, i think it will be a great day for me stackoverflow.com/questions/3968553/… –  John Oct 19 '10 at 13:29
    
No advantage: this code does not even compile as the add() operation is trying to insert a String and not a HashMaps<String,String>. It means however that the code probably is not doing what you think it does. I don't know what TCNT is more than its a key that is supposedly added to all maps in the arrList. I think you need to go back to your boss and ask for help from an experienced coder - this code is just confused and wrong. –  KarlP Oct 19 '10 at 13:36
    
The "generics" is that you specify whats contained in the list and maps ( basically the stuff inside the angle-brackets) I inferred that on the lists and maps thats created using what I think is in the arguments and return variables. Generics is good because the compiler will then not allow you inserting a "wrong" data type in a list. –  KarlP Oct 19 '10 at 13:38

This method as far as I can see doesn't hold references on some enclosing classes fields, therefore it can't cause memory leaking.

share|improve this answer
    
what do u mean by that?? can u explain a bit more –  John Oct 19 '10 at 12:05
3  
@John, it uses only method local variables, which will automatically get garbage collected after returning from the method. Memory can only leak in Java if a reference to some object(s) is kept for the lifetime of the app. Practically the only way to this is to (directly or indirectly) keep a reference in a static class member field. But there are no fields used in this code. –  Péter Török Oct 19 '10 at 12:07

Other than the argument all variables live in method scope. They will be marked for garbage collection when the method terminates.

share|improve this answer

Ask your boss if really means memory leakage, or whether he means it's using too much memory. Tell him there's a big difference and you need to know which it is he's worried about.

share|improve this answer

Java comes with a garbage collector.. So what exactly do you mean by memory leakage?? If a memory has no references it will be automatically deallocated..

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not an answer to the question. Try googling "java memory leak". –  Péter Török Oct 19 '10 at 12:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.