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If I have an active timeout running that was set through var t = setTimeout("dosomething()", 5000),

Is there anyway to pause and resume it?


Is there any way to get the time remaining on the current timeout?
or do I have to in a variable, when the timeout is set, store the current time, then we we pause, get the difference between now and then?

share|improve this question
    
For those that are wondering, The pausing is for eg: a div is set to disappear in 5 seconds, at 3 seconds (so 2 seconds left) the user mouses over the div, you pause the timeout, once the user mouses off the div you resume it, 2 seconds later it disappears. –  Hailwood Oct 19 '10 at 15:39

11 Answers 11

up vote 124 down vote accepted

You could wrap window.setTimeout like this, which I think is similar to what you were suggesting in the question:

function Timer(callback, delay) {
    var timerId, start, remaining = delay;

    this.pause = function() {
        window.clearTimeout(timerId);
        remaining -= new Date() - start;
    };

    this.resume = function() {
        start = new Date();
        timerId = window.setTimeout(callback, remaining);
    };

    this.resume();
}

var timer = new Timer(function() {
    alert("Done!");
}, 1000);

timer.pause();
// Do some stuff...
timer.resume();
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1  
+1 Same answer, faster on the draw! Point to you sir. :-) –  Sean Vieira Oct 19 '10 at 15:45
2  
So simple, very nice. –  AlienWebguy Feb 8 '12 at 21:44
5  
I don't like this answer... I love it. –  Richard May 4 '12 at 12:06
2  
@yckart: Rolled back, sorry. It's a good addition except that adding additional parameters to setTimeout() doesn't work in Internet Explorer <= 9. –  Tim Down Mar 31 '13 at 12:51
1  
If you do timer.resume(); timer.resume(); you'll end up having two timeouts in parallel. That's why you would want to either clearTimeout(timerId) first or do a if (timerId) return; short circuit at the very beginning of resume. –  kernel Aug 14 '13 at 15:06

Something like this should do the trick.

function Timer(fn, countdown) {
    var ident, complete = false;

    function _time_diff(date1, date2) {
        return date2 ? date2 - date1 : new Date().getTime() - date1;
    }

    function cancel() {
        clearTimeout(ident);
    }

    function pause() {
        clearTimeout(ident);
        total_time_run = _time_diff(start_time);
        complete = total_time_run >= countdown;
    }

    function resume() {
        ident = complete ? -1 : setTimeout(fn, countdown - total_time_run);
    }

    var start_time = new Date().getTime();
    ident = setTimeout(fn, countdown);

    return { cancel: cancel, pause: pause, resume: resume };
}
share|improve this answer
    
I changed +new Date() to new Date().getTime() since it is faster: jsperf.com/date-vs-gettime –  yckart Mar 31 '13 at 2:28

No. You'll need cancel it (clearTimeout), measure the time since you started it and restart it with the new time.

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A slightly modified version of Tim Downs answer. However, since Tim rolled back my edit, I've to answer this myself. My solution makes it possible to use extra arguments as third (3, 4, 5...) parameter and to clear the timer:

function Timer(callback, delay) {
    var args = arguments,
        self = this,
        timer, start;

    this.clear = function () {
        clearTimeout(timer);
    };

    this.pause = function () {
        this.clear();
        delay -= new Date() - start;
    };

    this.resume = function () {
        start = new Date();
        timer = setTimeout(function () {
            callback.apply(self, Array.prototype.slice.call(args, 2, args.length));
        }, delay);
    };

    this.resume();
}

As Tim mentioned, extra parameters are not available in IE lt 9, however I worked a bit around so that it will work in oldIE's too.

Usage: new Timer(Function, Number, arg1, arg2, arg3...)

function callback(foo, bar) {
    console.log(foo); // "foo"
    console.log(bar); // "bar"
}

var timer = new Timer(callback, 1000, "foo", "bar");

timer.pause();
document.onclick = timer.resume;
share|improve this answer

"Pause" and "resume" don't really make much sense in the context of setTimeout, which is a one-off thing. Do you mean setInterval? If so, no, you can't pause it, you can only cancel it (clearInterval) and then re-schedule it again. Details of all of these in the Timers section of the spec.

// Setting
var t = setInterval(doSomething, 1000);

// Pausing (which is really stopping)
clearInterval(t);
t = 0;

// Resuming (which is really just setting again)
t = setInterval(doSomething, 1000);
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6  
In the context of setTimeout, pause and resume still make sense. –  beardtree Jun 24 '12 at 3:32

The Timeout was easy enough to find a solution for, but the Interval was a little bit trickier.

I came up with the following two classes to solve this issues:

function PauseableTimeout(func, delay){
    this.func = func;

    var _now = new Date().getTime();
    this.triggerTime = _now + delay;

    this.t = window.setTimeout(this.func,delay);

    this.paused_timeLeft = 0;

    this.getTimeLeft = function(){
        var now = new Date();

        return this.triggerTime - now;
    }

    this.pause = function(){
        this.paused_timeLeft = this.getTimeLeft();

        window.clearTimeout(this.t);
        this.t = null;
    }

    this.resume = function(){
        if (this.t == null){
            this.t = window.setTimeout(this.func, this.paused_timeLeft);
        }
    }

    this.clearTimeout = function(){ window.clearTimeout(this.t);}
}

function PauseableInterval(func, delay){
    this.func = func;
    this.delay = delay;

    this.triggerSetAt = new Date().getTime();
    this.triggerTime = this.triggerSetAt + this.delay;

    this.i = window.setInterval(this.func, this.delay);

    this.t_restart = null;

    this.paused_timeLeft = 0;

    this.getTimeLeft = function(){
        var now = new Date();
        return this.delay - ((now - this.triggerSetAt) % this.delay);
    }

    this.pause = function(){
        this.paused_timeLeft = this.getTimeLeft();
        window.clearInterval(this.i);
        this.i = null;
    }

    this.restart = function(sender){
        sender.i = window.setInterval(sender.func, sender.delay);
    }

    this.resume = function(){
        if (this.i == null){
            this.i = window.setTimeout(this.restart, this.paused_timeLeft, this);
        }
    }

    this.clearInterval = function(){ window.clearInterval(this.i);}
}

These can be implemented as such:

var pt_hey = new PauseableTimeout(function(){
    alert("hello");
}, 2000);

window.setTimeout(function(){
    pt_hey.pause();
}, 1000);

window.setTimeout("pt_hey.start()", 2000);

This example will set a pauseable Timeout (pt_hey) which is scheduled to alert, "hey" after two seconds. Another Timeout pauses pt_hey after one second. A third Timeout resumes pt_hey after two seconds. pt_hey runs for one second, pauses for one second, then resumes running. pt_hey triggers after three seconds.

Now for the trickier intervals

var pi_hey = new PauseableInterval(function(){
    console.log("hello world");
}, 2000);

window.setTimeout("pi_hey.pause()", 5000);

window.setTimeout("pi_hey.resume()", 6000);

This example sets a pauseable Interval (pi_hey) to write "hello world" in the console every two seconds. A timeout pauses pi_hey after five seconds. Another timeout resumes pi_hey after six seconds. So pi_hey will trigger twice, run for one second, pause for one second, run for one second, and then continue triggering every 2 seconds.

OTHER FUNCTIONS

  • clearTimeout() and clearInterval()

    pt_hey.clearTimeout(); and pi_hey.clearInterval(); serve as an easy way to clear the timeouts and intervals.

  • getTimeLeft()

    pt_hey.getTimeLeft(); and pi_hey.getTimeLeft(); will return how many milliseconds till the next trigger is scheduled to occur.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain your thoughts, why we need a complex Class to pause a setInterval? I think a simple if(!true) return; will do the trick, or am I wrong? –  yckart Mar 31 '13 at 15:32
1  
I made it so that you can literally pause the interval, instead of just skipping a call when it triggers. If, in a game, a power-up is released every 60 seconds, and I pause the game just before it is about to trigger, using your method, I will have to wait for another minute for another power-up. That isn't truly pausing, that is just ignoring a call. Instead, My method is actually pausing, and therefore, the power-up is released 'on-time' in respect to game-play. –  Tyler Whitehouse Aug 7 '13 at 14:32

I don't think you'll find anything better than clearTimeout. Anyway, you can always schedule another timeout later, instead 'resuming' it.

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You could also implement it with events.

Instead of calculating the time difference, you start and stop listening to a 'tick' event which keeps running in the background:

var Slideshow = {

  _create: function(){                  
    this.timer = window.setInterval(function(){
      $(window).trigger('timer:tick'); }, 8000);
  },

  play: function(){            
    $(window).bind('timer:tick', function(){
      // stuff
    });       
  },

  pause: function(){        
    $(window).unbind('timer:tick');
  }

};
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If you're using jquery anyhow, check out the $.doTimeout plugin. This thing is a huge improvement over setTimeout, including letting you keep track of your time-outs with a single string id that you specify and that doesn't change every time you set it, and implement easy canceling, polling loops & debouncing, and more. One of my most-used jquery plugins.

Unfortunately, it doesn't support pause/resume out of the box. For this, you would need to wrap or extend $.doTimeout, presumably similarly to the accepted answer.

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I was hoping doTimeout would have pause/resume, but I'm not seeing it when looking at the full documentation, looping examples, and even source. The closest to pause I could see is cancel, but then I'd have to recreate the timer with function again. Did I miss something? –  ericslaw Aug 26 '12 at 8:56
    
Sorry to lead you down the wrong path. I've removed that inaccuracy from my answer. –  Ben Roberts Aug 28 '12 at 14:33

You could look into clearTimeout()

or pause depending on a global variable that is set when a certain condition is hit. Like a button is pressed.

  <button onclick="myBool = true" > pauseTimeout </button>

  <script>
  var myBool = false;

  var t = setTimeout(function() {if (!mybool) {dosomething()}}, 5000);
  </script>
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2  
eval is evil. Don't pass strings to setTimeout... –  Ivo Wetzel Oct 19 '10 at 14:54

If you have several divs to hide, you could use an setInterval and a number of cycles to do like in:

<div id="div1">1</div><div id="div2">2</div>
<div id="div3">3</div><div id="div4">4</div>
<script>
    function hideDiv(elm){
        var interval,
            unit = 1000,
            cycle = 5,
            hide = function(){
                interval = setInterval(function(){
                    if(--cycle === 0){
                        elm.style.display = 'none';
                        clearInterval(interval);
                    }
                    elm.setAttribute('data-cycle', cycle);
                    elm.innerHTML += '*';
                }, unit);
            };
        elm.onmouseover = function(){
            clearInterval(interval);
        };
        elm.onmouseout = function(){
            hide();
        };
        hide();
    }
    function hideDivs(ids){
        var id;
        while(id = ids.pop()){
            hideDiv(document.getElementById(id));
        }
    }
    hideDivs(['div1','div2','div3','div4']);
</script>
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