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For fun when I have time, I like to code games to see how hard it is or just because I want to see how it works from the inside or just for personal challenge. I just like coding. For now, I made these ones.

So I made a Sudoku board. First it was the normal 3x3x3 board but then someone asked me to do a 4x4x4 board. I was successful but my algorithm is pretty slow.

The question is, how would you do a fast algorithm for a 4x4x4 (or more) Sudoku board?

My current algorithm works like this: I will fill grid 1 with a random number, making sure I don't put back the same number, then switch to grid 2. When I'm in the position 0.0 or any other one in the grid I remove any possible number from grid 1. I go on like that for every line/column in the grid. (By now you can see that English is not my first language so I'm sorry if it's hard to understand.)


Update:
a little followup, a few months later.

My current solution can be found here

So when I started this question, it as doing 1 grid every 30-50 seconds and now it's over 300 per seconds

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closed as off topic by Fredou Jan 15 '09 at 16:27

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What -- exactly -- is the question? Or is this just a blog posting? If it's just a blog posting, please get your own blog at blogspot.com – S.Lott Dec 29 '08 at 12:52
    
for now joel.neely way seem to be a nicer way to do it than mine, anyone else got another way? if not I will mark his answer when I will have tried his suggestion later this week. – Fredou Dec 29 '08 at 12:53
    
@S.Lott, the question is how to quickly generate a 4x4x4 or more sudoku grid – Fredou Dec 29 '08 at 12:54
    
Removed bloggish-rambling from the post to try and make it a more concise question. – mmcdole Dec 31 '08 at 18:28
    
I fixed my code so now it's way faster than before, over 80 grid/sec. before it was like 1 per minute – Fredou Jan 15 '09 at 16:27

Consider the following grid:

 1  2  3  4 |  5  6  7  8 |  9 10 11 12 | 13 14 15 16
 5  6  7  8 |  9 10 11 12 | 13 14 15 16 |  1  2  3  4
 9 10 11 12 | 13 14 15 16 |  1  2  3  4 |  5  6  7  8
13 14 15 16 |  1  2  3  4 |  5  6  7  8 |  9 10 11 12
------------+-------------+-------------+------------
 2  3  4  1 |  6  7  8  5 | 10 11 12  9 | 14 15 16 13
 6  7  8  5 | 10 11 12  9 | 14 15 16 13 |  2  3  4  1
10 11 12  9 | 14 15 16 13 |  2  3  4  1 |  6  7  8  5
14 15 16 13 |  2  3  4  1 |  6  7  8  5 | 10 11 12  9
------------+-------------+-------------+------------
 3  4  1  2 |  7  8  5  6 | 11 12  9 10 | 15 16 13 14
 7  8  5  6 | 11 12  9 10 | 15 16 13 14 |  3  4  1  2
11 12  9 10 | 15 16 13 14 |  3  4  1  2 |  7  8  5  6
15 16 13 14 |  3  4  1  2 |  7  8  5  6 | 11 12  9 10
------------+-------------+-------------+------------
 4  1  2  3 |  8  5  6  7 | 12  9 10 11 | 16 13 14 15
 8  5  6  7 | 12  9 10 11 | 16 13 14 15 |  4  1  2  3
12  9 10 11 | 16 13 14 15 |  4  1  2  3 |  8  5  6  7
16 13 14 15 |  4  1  2  3 |  8  5  6  7 | 12  9 10 11

Assuming that I haven't made any typos, it should be obvious (from the pattern of its construction) that this follows the requirements of a Sudoku layout (each value 1..16 occurs exactly once in each row, column, and 4x4 subgrid).

In addition, it should be obvious that each of the following changes leaves the requirements satisfied (where 1-origin indexing is assumed):

  1. Column swaps: exchange the entire contents of any two columns that lie within the same subgrid (e.g. swapping cols 1 and 3, swapping cols 10 and 11, but not swapping cols 6 and 13).

  2. Row swaps: exchange the entire contents of any two columns that lie within the same subgrid (similar indexing to #1).

  3. Subgrid column swaps: exchange corresponding columns of two columns of subgrids (e.g. swap subgrid cols 2 and 4, which means swapping all of cols 5 and 13, cols 6 and 14, cols 7 and 15, and cols 8 and 16).

  4. Subgrid row swaps: exchange corresponding rows of two rows of subgrids (similar indexing to #3).

So, based on the above facts, the strategy is to begin with the grid shown above, then for some suitable number of iterations (you can determine this by experiment), randomly choose one of the four transforms, and apply it to randomly-chosen indices that satisfy the requirements stated for the transform.

For example, to apply transform #1, randomly choose a subgrid column number sgcn in the range (1..4), then randomly choose two distinct column numbers cn1 and cn2 in the range (1..4). Swap all values in columns (sgcn - 1) * 4 + cn1 and (sgcn - 1) * 4 + cn2.

By starting with a (any) legal grid, and performing legality-preserving transformations, the result is guaranteed to be legal. However, as the number of transforms applied increases, it is progressively more difficult for a human observer to distinguish the pattern from randomness.

Replacing values in the "scrambled" grid with blanks to get the desired degree of difficulty.

share|improve this answer
    
interesting way to generate a random grid, I will try it this week when I will find free time which should be soon because of the new year eve! – Fredou Dec 29 '08 at 12:51
    
Interesting indeed. I wonder: This algorithm resembles the Naive Shuffle for arrays, which would tend to indicate that like the naive shuffle, it probably generates some boards with higher frequency than others. I wonder, is there an equivalent to the Knuth shuffle for Sudoku? – Nick Johnson Dec 29 '08 at 18:36
    
sadly, it's not generating real random grid – Fredou Dec 31 '08 at 17:36
    
"Replacing values in the scrambled grid with blanks to get the desired degree of difficulty." This is harder than it sounds, assuming that you want the resulting puzzle to have only 1 solution. Every time you make a square blank, you need to verify that the puzzle is still only has 1 solution. – mbeckish Dec 31 '08 at 18:33

What is your current algorithm?

I imagine the algorithms discussed on Wikipedia's Algorithmics of sudoku page could be expanded to 4x4x4.

share|improve this answer
    
when I created the code, I didn't look at other algorithm because I wanted to do everything by myself but I'm sure there is not a lot of way to do it. I will update my original post with how i did mine soon. – Fredou Dec 29 '08 at 2:07
    
@Fredou, you want to do it all yourself but you are asking us? That doesn't make sense. If you no longer want to do it "yourself" then please, try and implement one of the known algorithms from the Wikipedia page. – mmcdole Dec 31 '08 at 18:22
    
i would say my algorithm look like "stochastic search / optimization methods" for the url above, for a 9x9 it take less than a second but the problem is when i try to do a 16x16 (4x4x4) it can take minutes – Fredou Dec 31 '08 at 20:39
    
result of my question can be found here codeproject.com/KB/vb/CodeBehindSudoku.aspx , thanks! – Fredou Apr 22 '09 at 13:28

A Sudoku Generator written in Python is available. An explanation (algorithm) on how the author generates the Sudoku boards is on that page, and the source code is provided.

share|improve this answer
    
quick look at the code show a hardcoded value of 3x3x3 grid – Fredou Dec 29 '08 at 4:06
    
@Fredou, Just adjust the values. =] – strager Dec 29 '08 at 4:14
    
@strager, sadly I'm not a python programmer and it seem it's not just a matter of changing 81 to 256... – Fredou Dec 29 '08 at 4:20

this is the code for joel.neely suggestion

pass 3 for 3x3x3, 4 for 4x4x4, etc

Public Class Class1

Private aSquare(,,) As Integer
Private iSquare As Integer

Sub New(ByVal squareSize As Integer)

    iSquare = squareSize
    ReDim aSquare(iSquare - 1, iSquare - 1, CInt(iSquare ^ 2 - 1))

    createSquare()
    rndSquare()

End Sub



Private Sub createSquare()
    Dim i As Integer, j As Integer, k As Integer

    For i = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(0)
        For j = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(1)
            For k = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(2)
                If i = 0 And j = 0 Then
                    aSquare(i, j, k) = k + 1
                ElseIf j = 0 And i > 0 Then
                    If (k + i) Mod (iSquare) = 0 Then
                        aSquare(i, j, k) = aSquare(i - 1, j, k) - (iSquare - 1)

                    Else
                        aSquare(i, j, k) = aSquare(i - 1, j, k) + 1
                    End If
                Else
                    aSquare(i, j, k) = aSquare(i, j - 1, k) + iSquare
                End If

                If aSquare(i, j, k) > iSquare ^ 2 Then
                    aSquare(i, j, k) = aSquare(i, j, k) - CInt(iSquare ^ 2)
                End If
            Next
        Next
    Next
End Sub

Private Sub rndSquare()
    Dim i As Integer

    Randomize()

    For i = 0 To CInt(iSquare ^ 2)

        Select Case CInt(Rnd() * 3)
            Case 0
                rndBigCol()
            Case 1
                rndBigRow()
            Case 2
                rndLittleCol()
            Case 3
                rndlittleRow()
        End Select

    Next



End Sub

Private Sub rndBigCol()
    Dim square As Integer
    Dim rnd1, rnd2 As Integer
    Dim i As Integer, j As Integer, k As Integer

    Randomize()

    For k = 0 To iSquare
        Do
            rnd1 = CInt(Rnd() * aSquare.GetUpperBound(1))
            rnd2 = CInt(Rnd() * aSquare.GetUpperBound(1))
        Loop Until rnd1 <> rnd2

        For i = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(0)
            For j = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(2)
                square = aSquare(i, rnd1, j)
                aSquare(i, rnd1, j) = aSquare(i, rnd2, j)
                aSquare(i, rnd2, j) = square
            Next
        Next
    Next
End Sub

Private Sub rndBigRow()
    Dim square As Integer
    Dim rnd1, rnd2 As Integer
    Dim i As Integer, j As Integer, k As Integer

    Randomize()

    For k = 0 To iSquare
        Do
            rnd1 = CInt(Rnd() * aSquare.GetUpperBound(0))
            rnd2 = CInt(Rnd() * aSquare.GetUpperBound(0))
        Loop Until rnd1 <> rnd2

        For i = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(1)
            For j = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(2)
                square = aSquare(rnd1, i, j)
                aSquare(rnd1, i, j) = aSquare(rnd2, i, j)
                aSquare(rnd2, i, j) = square
            Next
        Next
    Next
End Sub

Private Sub rndLittleCol()
    Dim square As Integer
    Dim rnd1, rnd2, rnd3 As Integer
    Dim i As Integer, k As Integer, l As Integer

    Randomize()

    For k = 0 To iSquare * 2
        Do
            rnd1 = CInt(Rnd() * aSquare.GetUpperBound(1))
            rnd2 = CInt(Rnd() * (iSquare - 1))
            rnd3 = CInt(Rnd() * (iSquare - 1))
        Loop Until rnd2 <> rnd3

        For i = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(0)
            For l = 0 To (iSquare - 1)
                square = aSquare(i, rnd1, rnd2 + (l * iSquare))
                aSquare(i, rnd1, rnd2 + (l * iSquare)) = aSquare(i, rnd1, rnd3 + (l * iSquare))
                aSquare(i, rnd1, rnd3 + (l * iSquare)) = square
            Next
        Next
    Next
End Sub

Private Sub rndlittleRow()
    Dim square As Integer
    Dim rnd1, rnd2, rnd3 As Integer
    Dim j As Integer, k As Integer, l As Integer

    Randomize()

    For k = 0 To iSquare * 2
        Do
            rnd1 = CInt(Rnd() * aSquare.GetUpperBound(0))
            rnd2 = CInt(Rnd() * (iSquare - 1))
            rnd3 = CInt(Rnd() * (iSquare - 1))
        Loop Until rnd2 <> rnd3

        rnd2 *= iSquare
        rnd3 *= iSquare

        For j = 0 To aSquare.GetUpperBound(1)
            For l = 0 To (iSquare - 1)
                square = aSquare(rnd1, j, rnd2 + l)
                aSquare(rnd1, j, rnd2 + l) = aSquare(rnd1, j, rnd3 + l)
                aSquare(rnd1, j, rnd3 + l) = square
            Next
        Next
    Next
End Sub
End Class
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

ok I found out why it was so fast with a 3x3x3 but really slow with the 4x4x4

it was my back-tracking logic, it was very bad, now it take maximum 20 seconds (at least with my computer) most of them take less than 5 seconds

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