Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following two arrays:

EDIT

On suggestion from @Wrikken I've cleaned the first array and now have this:

First Array:

Array
(
    [0] => 3
    [1] => 4
    [2] => 9
    [3] => 11
)

Second Array:

Array
(
    [3] => stdClass Object ( [tid] => 3 )

    [12] => stdClass Object ( tid] => 12 )

    [9] => stdClass Object ( [tid] => 9 )
)

EDIT

The second array is being filtered on the first array. The second array has 3, 12, 9. The first array doesn't contain 12, so 12 should be removed from the second array.

So I should end up with:

Array
(
    [3] => stdClass Object ( [tid] => 3 )

    [9] => stdClass Object ( [tid] => 9 )
)
share|improve this question
    
this looks like homework to me... apologies in advance if it's not. Either way, what have you tried so far? – Brian Driscoll Oct 19 '10 at 16:17
1  
What you said you want and the result you want are the opposite – Galen Oct 19 '10 at 16:17
    
The first array does not contain the value 12 ? Why is the second element of the second array removed? – Felix Kling Oct 19 '10 at 16:18
    
Brian - Homework no, results from Drupal's API yes. Terrible array skills. ;; Galen - Perhaps its the wording? Sounds right in my head... – Russell Jones Oct 19 '10 at 16:20
    
Felix - The second array is being filtered on the first array. The second array has 3, 12, 9. The first array doesn't contain 12, so 12 should be removed from the second array. – Russell Jones Oct 19 '10 at 16:23

This should do the trick:

foreach ($firstArray as $item) {
    if (isset($item['value'])) {
        unset($secondArray[$item['value']];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
From the OPs comments I think this is wrong. If the value is not contained in the first array, it should be removed from the second array. – Felix Kling Oct 19 '10 at 16:29
1  
Sorry, I hadn't read the comments above. – xPheRe Oct 19 '10 at 16:42
up vote 3 down vote accepted

After some clean up it was pretty clear what I needed, and this little bit sorts it out:

foreach ($second_array as $foo) {
  if (!in_array($foo->tid, $first_array)) {
    unset($second_array[$foo->tid]);
  }
}   
share|improve this answer

You can do this:

$keys = array_map(function($val) { return $val['value']; }, $first);
$result = array_intersect_key(array_flip($keys), $second);

The array_map call will extract the value values from $first so that $keys is an array of these values. Then array_intersect_key is used to get the intersection of $keys (flipped to use the keys as values and vice versa) and the second array $second.

share|improve this answer

Use a callback in array_filter

If your first array really looks like that, you might want to alter it in a more usable one-dimensional array, so you use a simple in_array as part of your callback:

$values = array_map('reset',$array);

I only now see that the keys & object-ids are alike:

$result =  array_intersect_key($objectarray,array_flip(array_map('reset',$array)));
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I've been struggling with. "return $arr['value']" in the callback is what I expected to work. – Russell Jones Oct 19 '10 at 16:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.