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When I modify my resource file (.resx) add text or modify, the constructor of my resource always go to internal and after that, when I run my silverlight I have an error in my binding XAML.

Is there a way to avoid this scenario? I need to go in the designer of my resource and put the constructor to public to solve the problem

I use my resource like this in my xaml file

 <UserControl.Resources>
        <resources:LibraryItemDetailsView x:Key="LibraryItemDetailsViewResources"></resources:LibraryItemDetailsView>
    </UserControl.Resources>


<TextBlock FontSize="12" FontWeight="Bold" Text="{Binding Path=FileSelectedText3, Source={StaticResource LibraryItemDetailsViewResources}}"></TextBlock>
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I'm experiencing the same issue, it's annoying... –  Rumplin Jan 17 '11 at 8:03
    
I have done this in WPF, should work for Silverlight as well. –  adabyron Apr 24 '13 at 8:44

6 Answers 6

Another way to do this without code changes is as below. Worked well for me.

http://guysmithferrier.com/post/2010/09/PublicResourceCodeGenerator-now-works-with-Visual-Studio-2010.aspx

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This is the best answer. Install the exe and set the Custom Tool property of your resource file to "PublicResourceCodeGenerator". –  bkaid Nov 30 '11 at 19:35

You can create a public class that exposes the resources through a property:

public class StringsWrapper
{
    private static LibraryItemDetailsView _view = null;

    public LibraryItemDetailsView View
    {
        get
        {
            if (_view == null)
            {
                _view = new LibraryItemDetailsView();
            }
            return _view;
        }
    }
}

Then in your XAML you can access your resource:

<UserControl.Resources>
    <StringsWrapper x:Key="LibraryItemDetailsViewResources"></StringsWrapper>
</UserControl.Resources>


<TextBlock FontSize="12" FontWeight="Bold" Text="{Binding Path=View.FileSelectedText3, Source={StaticResource LibraryItemDetailsViewResources}}"></TextBlock>

This way the resx constructor can be internal!

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Well, what I did was to add a command line utility to pre-build event of each Silverlight project that replaces each internal string with public :)

You can edit pre-build and post-build events by: Right-clicking on a project -> Properties -> Build Events.

I used a utility called RXFIND, it's free and can replace a string within selected files using a RegEx regular expression.

Here's the command line I'm using:

"$(SolutionDir)ThirdParty\rxfind\rxfind.exe" "$(ProjectDir)Resources\*.Designer.cs" "/P:internal " "/R:public " /Q /B:2

Please note, that all my resources are located under Resource directory within each project and the command line utility resides in \ThirdParty\rxfind directory

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I also have the same error. To solve the problem I just created a public class that inherits from the class representing the resources file, knowing that it must also be public class this is my exep:

public class TrackResourceWrapper : TrackResource
{
}

with: TrackResourceWrapper is inheriting class TrackResource is the class which is located in the code resource file behind (public class)

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The reason for this is that you shouldn't be instantiating the class yourself. You should instead always use ConsoleApplication1.Resource1.ResourceManager which itself instantiates the class for you.

Here, ConsoleApplication1 is the name of your assembly and Resource1 the name of your resource file.

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Can you give me an example with binding ? –  Cédric Boivin Oct 19 '10 at 19:08
    
The ResourceManager that you mention doesn't expose the string variables so it won't be bindable. You'd have to use a GetX method to get any values from it. –  Aligned Feb 18 '11 at 15:44

I created a macro to do this for me for each file I edit. I still have to remember to run it, but it's a lot quicker. Please see my post.

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