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My question is about two answers to another question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3083692/using-class-static-methods-as-default-parameter-values-within-methods-of-the-same.

I am trying to understand if there's really a difference between what the two answers do, and if so, what's the pros and cons of each.

Question: how to use a class method as a default parameter to a method in the same class.

Answer 1: use a function instead of a class method

class X:
    def default_func(x):
        return True

    def test(self, func = default_func):
        return func(self)

Answer 2: use a class method, but convert it to a function

def unstaticmethod(static):
    return static.__get__(None, object)

class X:
    @staticmethod
    def default_func(x):
        return True

    def test(self, func = unstaticmethod(default_func)):
        return func(self)

This was originally written in Python 2, but my summary is (hopefully) Python 3.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer really depends on what other intentions you have for X.default_func. If you intend for X.default_func to be called outside of an instance of X, then you want it to be a static method (Answer 2).

# in other code...
some_object = "Bring out your dead"
X.default_func(some_object)

If, on the other hand, you don't expect that default_func will ever be called except within an instance of X (and of course used as the default for test), I would re-write Answer 1 to be a proper method (and use the convention of self).

class X:
    def default_func(self):
        return True

    def test(self, func = default_func):
        return func(self)

As a side note, I'd like to point out that you could have written Answer 2 differently to avoid the unstaticmethod:

class X:
    def default_func(x):
        return True

    def test(self, func = default_func):
        return func(self)

    default_func = staticmethod(default_func)

The reason that works is because class X isn't created (and default_func doesn't become a method of X) until after the entire block beneath class X: is processed (including the default argument for test(func)).

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I'll be confused. If default_func will only be called within test(), but test() is called from outside the class, how can I make a call from outside the class equivalent to "X().test(func=second_func)" where second_func is a member function of X. –  Charles Merriam Nov 26 '11 at 4:29
    
Python 2 doesn't have the concept of a "member function". Classes and their instances only have methods. If "second_func" is a regular instance method, you'll need to get the underlying function using im_func: X().test(func=X.second_func.im_func). I don't recommend doing so. If you need to select methods dynamically, you're probably better passing the method names to the test function, then doing something like getattr(self, func_name)() in test, and let Python do the instance binding. –  Jason R. Coombs Nov 30 '11 at 20:29

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