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I have a these structures definitions

typedef struct my_s {
   int x;
   int y;
} my_T;

typedef struct your_s {
    my_T * x;
} your_T;

your_T array[MAX_COL][MAX_ROW];

To initialize the array's pointer to NULL, can I do:

memset (array, 0, sizeof(array))

this does not look right to me.

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Shouldn't that be "your_T array[MAX_ROW][MAX_COL];" since arrays in C++ are row-major order? –  Robert Gamble Dec 29 '08 at 5:40
    
oops, a typo, you are right –  dave Dec 29 '08 at 7:18

2 Answers 2

easiest is

your_T array[MAX_COL][MAX_ROW] = {{{0}}};
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1  
+1, just to clarify, this works because all members not explicitly initialized will be set to 0 which is a null pointer. –  Robert Gamble Dec 29 '08 at 5:18
    
hmn, trying this, compiler gave warnings: missing braces around initializer near array[0][0], my warnings are treated as errors. –  dave Dec 29 '08 at 5:24
    
sorry, forgot third set of braces. Array of array of struct. –  rampion Dec 29 '08 at 14:36
typedef struct my_s {
   int x;
   int y;
} my_T;

typedef struct your_s {
    my_T * x;
} your_T;

your_T array[MAX_COL][MAX_ROW];

You cannot initialize the pointers of your_T to null using memset, because it is not specified that a null pointer has its bit pattern all consisting of null bits. But you can create your array like this:

your_T array[MAX_COL][MAX_ROW] = {{}};

The elements will be default initialized, which means for a pointer that the pointer will contain a null pointer value. If your array is global, you don't even have to care. That will happen by default then.

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Thanks for the information. I know when global, it is defaulted to NULL, but I want to make sure it is NULL-ed since I am running in the embedded space... –  dave Dec 29 '08 at 5:18
    
right then you are fine with {{}}. the indent is that an implementation could store a value different from 0x0 in the pointer, which when dereferenced by a following read of that memory cell could cause a trap to be generated. thus, the 0x0 bit pattern is not neccassary what is in a null pointer. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 29 '08 at 5:20
    
+1. Empty brace initialization is illegal in C but, as I just learned, legal in C++, is this a common/useful construct? –  Robert Gamble Dec 29 '08 at 5:22
1  
I believe that a null pointer is defined as being 0 (C++03,4.10): ' A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression (5.19) rvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero.' This of course does not mean that the pointer will be zero, but that assigning 0 will make the pointer null –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 29 '08 at 8:16
1  
yes, a null pointer constant is every integer constant expression that yields zero (all bits zero). such as ('a'-'a') or simple 0. converting it to a pointer will yield a null pointer value, which is NOT all bits zero anymore necassarily. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 29 '08 at 8:25

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