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I find that I need to write the same code in many classes. The code has to do with conversion between types. As I am not familiar with generics, would someone suggest how to convert the following to use generics:

public class WidgetList : List<Widget> { }

public class Widget
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Widget() { }

    public Widget(int Id, string Name)
    {
        this.Id = Id;
        this.Name = Name;
    }
}

public class WidgetManager
{
    public static List<Widget> ToListType(WidgetList list)
    {
        return list.ToList<Widget>();
    }

    public static WidgetList ToTypeList(List<Widget> list)
    {
        WidgetList typeList = new WidgetList();
        foreach (Widget item in list)
        {
            typeList.Add(w);
        }

        return typeList;
    }
}
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2  
Maybe I'm misunderstanding your intentions but what is the point of haveing a WidgetList type? WidgetList is a blank subclass of List<Widget> so the only real purpose it serves is to give a specific name to List<Widget>. –  Stephan Oct 19 '10 at 20:00
    
I am not sure why you are sub-classing a generic List if you are not adding functionality. Is there a reason you are sub-classing? Why can't you just operate on a List<Widget>? –  linuxuser27 Oct 19 '10 at 20:00
    
It's a pattern thing...to help us be lazy coders. We are not adding any properties to the WidgetList. Its simply a collection. Most of our code consumes the list. The only time that we need to have the List<Widget> is when using linq to filter data contained in the list. That's why I would like to write generic conversion methods. –  sme Oct 19 '10 at 20:33
    
Not sure which pattern you think you're implementing, but obfuscating the type without adding value is just going to make it harder for you (and especially others) in the long run. Suppose you encountered some code that didn't use string, but instead used LadenString. At first you might think, "ah, laden must have extended string for some reason." But then you see LadenString : string { }. How does that make you feel? –  ladenedge Oct 20 '10 at 5:06
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's the magic:

Add an extension to IEnumerable:

public static class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    public static T2 ToListContainer<T1, T2>(this IEnumerable<T1> list) where T2: List<T1>, new()
    {
        T2 listContainer = new T2();
        listContainer.AddRange(list);
        return listContainer;
    }

}

The above will copy the contents of the IEnumerable list T1 to the new List Container object T2 and return it.

Just to test:

WidgetList widgets = new WidgetList();

widgets.Add(new Widget(1, "Dog 1"));
widgets.Add(new Widget(2, "Dog 2"));
widgets.Add(new Widget(3, "Dog 3"));
widgets.Add(new Widget(4, "Cat 1"));
widgets.Add(new Widget(5, "Dog 2"));
widgets.Add(new Widget(6, "Dog 3"));


widgets  =  (from w in widgets
             where w.Name.Contains("1")
             select w).ToListContainer<Widget, WidgetList>();

int c = widgets.Count();
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Well, your code snippet is using generics.

Perhaps your impression is that generics are abstract in some sense and must be implemented to be of any use, but if that's the case you are (happily!) mistaken.

Just delete your WidgetManager and WidgetList classes. You can use List<Widget> without any additional complexity. For example:

var widgets = new List<Widget>();

widgets.Add(new Widget(42, "foo"));
widgets.Add(new Widget(43, "bar"));

foreach (var widget in widgets)
   Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", widget.Id, widget.Name);
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It looks like you're already using generics, so maybe I'm not understanding the question. The generic List<T> gives you the strong-typing of the list contents as Widgets at the point where you declare the generic type T to be a Widget, so unless there's some explicit reason why you need the WidgetList object, that class (and the WidgetManager) are superfluous.

List<T> is not abstract, so you can accomplish everything that's shown here with just the Widget class...then when you need a list of Widgets, you can just create a List<Widget>.

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I will assume you absolutely need a custom collection object (WidgetList), but see note at bottom of the answer if you are not sure. In that case what I would recommend is the following:

  • Have WidgetList implement IList<Widget> rather than deriving from List<Widget>. Else, it's rather pointless. You can still use List<Widget> as the implementation.
  • Since IList<Widget> is also an IEnumerable<Widget>, you will have ToList<Widtget>(), for free with Linq extensions.
  • Also make sure you have a WidgetList constructor taking an IEnumerable<Widget> rather than a fonction in a different class.
  • An AddRange(IEnumerable<Widget>) is also very useful.

On a side note, you don't need a WidgetList if all it does is exactly the same a List<Widget>. Just use a List<Widget> directly instead, they offer all the typing that is provided by collection objects. I know you will find a lot of those collection objects in the framework library, but they are there either because they existed before generics, or because they have additional behaviours on Add and Remove.

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Just a clarification to the question - since I'm also on sme's team. The reason for the strongly typed WidgetList is because we use the XML deserializer to convert a list of widgets from XML passed from our database:

<Widgets>
 <Widget>
    <Id>1</Id>
    <Name>Kitten Kung-Foo</Id>
 </Widget>
 <Widget>
    <Id>2</Id>
    <Name>Puppy Punches</Name>
 </Widget>
<Widgets>

So here's the same code again with the XML attributes:

[XmlType("Widgets"), Serializable]
public class WidgetList : List<Widget> { }

[XmlType("Widget"), Serializable]
public class Widget
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Widget() { }

    public Widget(int Id, string Name)
    {
        this.Id = Id;
        this.Name = Name;
    }
}

I'm pretty sure we need the WidgetList in order for the Deserializer to pick up on the fact that there is a collection of Widgets.

Maybe not?

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