Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't figure this one out:

I have a function, e.g.

function test () {
  this.rating = 0;
  $j('#star_rating a').click(function() {
    alert(this.rating);
  });
}

var foo = new test();

On click it alerts "undefined". What is wrong? Please help.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Inside the function, "this" is the element which has been clicked on, which is different to "this" outside the function. A simple fix:

function test () {
  this.rating = 0;
  var self = this;
  $j('#star_rating a').click(function() {
    alert(self.rating);
  });
}
share|improve this answer

Inside the .click() the this refers to the item clicked. So the context is different than when you set rating. Those two thiss are different.

You need to conserve the context somehow.

Also, you may want to return false; or event.preventDefault() if you are clicking on a link and you don't want the page to refresh

function test () {

  this.rating = 0;
  var oldThis = this;           // Conserving the context for use inside .click()

  $j('#star_rating a').click(function() {

       alert(oldThis.rating);

       return false; // Use this if you don't want the page to change / refresh
  });
}

var foo = new test();

Try it out with this jsFiddle

share|improve this answer

If you want to keep a this-like reference around inside an object for use later where this will probably mean something else, it's a common trick to assign this to a local instance variable. I use self.

function test () {
  var self = this;
  self.rating = 0;
  $j('#star_rating a').click(function() {
    alert(self.rating);
  });
}

var foo = new test();

The advantage of this trick is that inside all code in your object - even closures - self will always refer to the object. You can also use this to refer to whatever it normally means.

share|improve this answer

Like others have said, "this" is different in test and the anonymous function passed to click().

test is a global function, therefore, "this" is a reference to the window (global) object. What you are actually doing is setting a global variable, probably not an intended side-effect. (use alert(window.rating) to see what I mean)

For your example, there is no need to use "this", though I think your example is just to demonstrate a point. If it were real code, tt should be converted to:

function test () {
  var rating = 0;
  $j('#star_rating a').click(function() {
    alert(rating); //Use the closure defined in the outer function
  });
}

The point is that you shouldn't use "this" from global functions.

share|improve this answer

The this is different in both cases. Try using breakpoints in firebug to see what they are set to.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.