Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make a program to convert a number in any base to another base of the user's choice. The code I have so far goes like this:

innitvar = float(raw_input("Please enter a number: "))
basevar = int(raw_input("Please enter the base that your number is in: "))
convertvar = int(raw_input("Please enter the base that you would like to convert to: "))

These are the data that I get from the user. The initial number, its initial base, and the base the user wants to convert to. As I understand it, I need to convert to base 10, and then to the desired base, specified by the user.

This is where I'm hitting a brick wall: I need to multiply the leftmost digit in the initial number by its initial base, and then add the next digit to the right, and then repeat until I hit the rightmost digit. I understand how to do this on paper, but I have no idea how to put it into Python code. I'm not sure how I would multiply the first number, and then add the next, nor do I understand how to let the program know when to stop performing this operation.

I'm not asking to have the program written for me, but I would like to be pointed in the right direction.

Thanks for your time!

share|improve this question
    
What symbols are you assuming to use for your numbers? Base ten uses 0123456789, and base sixteen (hexadecimal) adds ABCDEF to that list of symbols. To be ready to convert from any base to any other base, you must have a list of symbols ready with their values up to your highest supported base minus one. –  Noctis Skytower Oct 19 '10 at 23:56
    
The way I understand it, I need to create a dictionary (which I more or less understand) to assign values to A-Z, so I can convert from any base to any base up to base 36. –  Just a Student Oct 20 '10 at 0:07
    
The proper spelling is 'initial', by the way. –  kwatford Oct 20 '10 at 3:19
    
Thanks for that, kwatford. –  Just a Student Oct 20 '10 at 4:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should be the first half of the answer to your problem. Can you figure out how to convert to a base?

# Create a symbol-to-value table.
SY2VA = {'0': 0,
         '1': 1,
         '2': 2,
         '3': 3,
         '4': 4,
         '5': 5,
         '6': 6,
         '7': 7,
         '8': 8,
         '9': 9,
         'A': 10,
         'B': 11,
         'C': 12,
         'D': 13,
         'E': 14,
         'F': 15,
         'G': 16,
         'H': 17,
         'I': 18,
         'J': 19,
         'K': 20,
         'L': 21,
         'M': 22,
         'N': 23,
         'O': 24,
         'P': 25,
         'Q': 26,
         'R': 27,
         'S': 28,
         'T': 29,
         'U': 30,
         'V': 31,
         'W': 32,
         'X': 33,
         'Y': 34,
         'Z': 35,
         'a': 36,
         'b': 37,
         'c': 38,
         'd': 39,
         'e': 40,
         'f': 41,
         'g': 42,
         'h': 43,
         'i': 44,
         'j': 45,
         'k': 46,
         'l': 47,
         'm': 48,
         'n': 49,
         'o': 50,
         'p': 51,
         'q': 52,
         'r': 53,
         's': 54,
         't': 55,
         'u': 56,
         'v': 57,
         'w': 58,
         'x': 59,
         'y': 60,
         'z': 61,
         '!': 62,
         '"': 63,
         '#': 64,
         '$': 65,
         '%': 66,
         '&': 67,
         "'": 68,
         '(': 69,
         ')': 70,
         '*': 71,
         '+': 72,
         ',': 73,
         '-': 74,
         '.': 75,
         '/': 76,
         ':': 77,
         ';': 78,
         '<': 79,
         '=': 80,
         '>': 81,
         '?': 82,
         '@': 83,
         '[': 84,
         '\\': 85,
         ']': 86,
         '^': 87,
         '_': 88,
         '`': 89,
         '{': 90,
         '|': 91,
         '}': 92,
         '~': 93}

# Take a string and base to convert to.
# Allocate space to store your number.
# For each character in your string:
#     Ensure character is in your table.
#     Find the value of your character.
#     Ensure value is within your base.
#     Self-multiply your number with the base.
#     Self-add your number with the digit's value.
# Return the number.

def str2int(string, base):
    integer = 0
    for character in string:
        assert character in SY2VA, 'Found unknown character!'
        value = SY2VA[character]
        assert value < base, 'Found digit outside base!'
        integer *= base
        integer += value
    return integer

Here is the second half of the solution. By using these two functions, converting bases is very easy to do.

# Create a value-to-symbol table.
VA2SY = dict(map(reversed, SY2VA.items()))

# Take a integer and base to convert to.
# Create an array to store the digits in.
# While the integer is not zero:
#     Divide the integer by the base to:
#         (1) Find the "last" digit in your number (value).
#         (2) Store remaining number not "chopped" (integer).
#     Save the digit in your storage array.
# Return your joined digits after putting them in the right order.

def int2str(integer, base):
    array = []
    while integer:
        integer, value = divmod(integer, base)
        array.append(VA2SY[value])
    return ''.join(reversed(array))

After putting it all together, you should end up with the program below. Please take time to figure it out!

innitvar = raw_input("Please enter a number: ")
basevar = int(raw_input("Please enter the base that your number is in: "))
convertvar = int(raw_input("Please enter the base that you would like to convert to: "))

# Create a symbol-to-value table.
SY2VA = {'0': 0,
         '1': 1,
         '2': 2,
         '3': 3,
         '4': 4,
         '5': 5,
         '6': 6,
         '7': 7,
         '8': 8,
         '9': 9,
         'A': 10,
         'B': 11,
         'C': 12,
         'D': 13,
         'E': 14,
         'F': 15,
         'G': 16,
         'H': 17,
         'I': 18,
         'J': 19,
         'K': 20,
         'L': 21,
         'M': 22,
         'N': 23,
         'O': 24,
         'P': 25,
         'Q': 26,
         'R': 27,
         'S': 28,
         'T': 29,
         'U': 30,
         'V': 31,
         'W': 32,
         'X': 33,
         'Y': 34,
         'Z': 35,
         'a': 36,
         'b': 37,
         'c': 38,
         'd': 39,
         'e': 40,
         'f': 41,
         'g': 42,
         'h': 43,
         'i': 44,
         'j': 45,
         'k': 46,
         'l': 47,
         'm': 48,
         'n': 49,
         'o': 50,
         'p': 51,
         'q': 52,
         'r': 53,
         's': 54,
         't': 55,
         'u': 56,
         'v': 57,
         'w': 58,
         'x': 59,
         'y': 60,
         'z': 61,
         '!': 62,
         '"': 63,
         '#': 64,
         '$': 65,
         '%': 66,
         '&': 67,
         "'": 68,
         '(': 69,
         ')': 70,
         '*': 71,
         '+': 72,
         ',': 73,
         '-': 74,
         '.': 75,
         '/': 76,
         ':': 77,
         ';': 78,
         '<': 79,
         '=': 80,
         '>': 81,
         '?': 82,
         '@': 83,
         '[': 84,
         '\\': 85,
         ']': 86,
         '^': 87,
         '_': 88,
         '`': 89,
         '{': 90,
         '|': 91,
         '}': 92,
         '~': 93}

# Take a string and base to convert to.
# Allocate space to store your number.
# For each character in your string:
#     Ensure character is in your table.
#     Find the value of your character.
#     Ensure value is within your base.
#     Self-multiply your number with the base.
#     Self-add your number with the digit's value.
# Return the number.

integer = 0
for character in innitvar:
    assert character in SY2VA, 'Found unknown character!'
    value = SY2VA[character]
    assert value < basevar, 'Found digit outside base!'
    integer *= basevar
    integer += value

# Create a value-to-symbol table.
VA2SY = dict(map(reversed, SY2VA.items()))

# Take a integer and base to convert to.
# Create an array to store the digits in.
# While the integer is not zero:
#     Divide the integer by the base to:
#         (1) Find the "last" digit in your number (value).
#         (2) Store remaining number not "chopped" (integer).
#     Save the digit in your storage array.
# Return your joined digits after putting them in the right order.

array = []
while integer:
    integer, value = divmod(integer, convertvar)
    array.append(VA2SY[value])
answer = ''.join(reversed(array))

# Display the results of the calculations.
print answer
share|improve this answer
    
I have never used tables or the def and return functions before. And I'm afraid that converting to a base is my problem, as I still do not know how to access individual digits in a number in order to multiply and add. –  Just a Student Oct 20 '10 at 0:37
    
def and return are two different keywords in Python, not functions. def allows you to create a function or method (a body of code that you can reuse by making "calls" to it), and return allows that body of code to return one or more values back to the "caller." As for accessing individual digits in a number, it helps to understand that there are no "individual digits" in a number. The base of a number does not matter so much as the value of the number. When you are converting a number into a representable base (a printable string for instance), you have to chop the number up by a base. –  Noctis Skytower Oct 20 '10 at 0:44
    
What do you mean by "chop the number up by a base."? If I can't take the "1" out of "1234" and multiply it, then add the "2", how am I supposed to convert to base 10? –  Just a Student Oct 20 '10 at 0:53
    
Again, you are thinking in "individual digits." Please do not think about the digits in your number. The str2int function above return a number of the int data type. This number has a value, but it does not have "digits" that you can access. For example, a = 16 assigns the decimal value of 16 to a. However, the decimal value of 16 has a representation (not value) of 10 in hexadecimal. Thinking about the value of the number regardless of the base or representation would be very helpful to you. Knowing the decimal "representation" is fine, but think in terms of the "value" instead. –  Noctis Skytower Oct 20 '10 at 1:03
    
I'm just becoming more and more confused. I have been trying to figure this out for hours now, but I cannot understand how to convert a base X number to base 10 using python code. –  Just a Student Oct 20 '10 at 1:12

I need to multiply the leftmost digit in the initial number by its innitial base, and then add the next digit to the right, and then repeat until I hit the rightmost digit.

So you need to get digits. In a list.

Hint 1: Use divmod() function to break a number into digits. Divide by 10 to get decimal digits.

Hint 2: While n > 0: you can use divmod() to get a quotient and a remainder. If you save the remainder in the list, and use the quotient as the new value of n your number gets smaller until what's left is zero and you're done.

Hint 3: Your digits arrive in right-to-left order. Use reverse to switch the order of the list of this bothers you. Or create the list by using insert(0,digit).

Now that you have the digits. In a list. You can iterate through the list.

Try the for statement on for size.

You might need to use a "multiple and add" loop. total = total * new_base + next_digit is the way the body of the loop often looks.

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is good, and I'm upvoting it. However, I discourage the insert(0, digit) approach unless you're dealing with a linked list---with an array (which Python uses, IIRC), each insert(0, digit) is an O(n) operation. (The reverse-at-the-end approach is the best one, of course.) –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 20 '10 at 0:02
    
What you described is the method to use after getting your innitial base to base 10, correct? I'm understanding this part, but I'm not sure how to access individual digits in a number to multiply and add in order to move from innitial base to base 10. –  Just a Student Oct 20 '10 at 0:10
    
@Chris Jester-Young. I'll assume you're talking about numbers with kabillions of digits. For ordinary 20-30 digit numbers, your optimization may not amount to much. –  S.Lott Oct 20 '10 at 0:12
    
"You might need to use a "multiple and add" loop. total = total * new_base + next_digit is the way the body of the loop often looks." This is where I'm lost. I don't know how to multiply the first digit, then add the next, then repeat to the end. –  Just a Student Oct 20 '10 at 0:18
    
@Just a Student: You have the digits in a list. They're separate numbers. Print the list. Look at it. Use for i in someList: to iterate through the digits/numbers. Try some code. Print stuff. Write for loops. Try things. Experiment. Explore. –  S.Lott Oct 20 '10 at 1:29

Just a Student, slow down with the idea of what you need. You may not need what you think you need.

Start at the beginning: the user inputs a number. The user inputs a base. These are both Strings. Say the base is 12, and the number is 1AB3. So you have a '1' in the 12^3 place, an 'A' in the 12^2 place, a 'B' in 12^1, and a '3' in the 12^0 (ones) place. If you want this number in base 10, you're going to need to add some numbers together.

Specifically, you need to add 1*12^3 + 10*12^2 + 11*12^1 + 3*12^0. Notice something here: you have 3,2,1,0. Which corresponds nicely to the LENGTH of the input string 1AB3. So probably a for loop would be helpful here. The user doesn't input an integer, they input a string. So you need the characters from the string, not the digits from the number.

How do you know what the symbols 'A' and 'C' represent in decimal notation? Look at the answer from Noctis Skytower!

So your first task is to figure out how to ITERATE THROUGH A STRING. Your second task is to figure out how to use the individual character values from your string to access the dictionary in Noctis Skytower's answer, and your third task is to figure out how to write a loop that takes advantage of that information.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1: Probably the most comprehensive answer to help this person understand, instead of just crapping out some response. –  Andrew Sledge Oct 20 '10 at 16:17
    
Thanks for explaining the math behind the operations. Teachers do not teach what they assume the students already know. I focused on the language, but your teaching why numbers work the way they do should be much more helpful in the long run. :) –  Noctis Skytower Oct 20 '10 at 16:53

You need to write two functions. In Scheme (since I know Scheme much better than Python :-P), those two functions are called string->number and number->string, though of course you can name them whatever you like.

Each of those functions needs to take a base parameter to do the conversion in. You can make it default to 10, if you like.

Once you implement each of those successfully, the rest is a piece of cake.

Test cases for you:

assert str2num('1234', 10) == 1234
assert str2num('1234', 16) == 0x1234
assert num2str(1234, 10) == '1234'
assert num2str(1234, 16) == '4d2'
assert num2str(0x1234, 16) == '1234'
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, but I'm -very- unskilled in Python. Could you explain what you mean by "In Scheme, those two functions are called string->number and number->string", as well as the code you typed? –  Just a Student Oct 19 '10 at 23:52
    
So, you need to write two functions: in the test cases, I've named them str2num and num2str. The first one converts the given string to a number, using the given base. The second one converts the given number to its string representation in the given base. –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 19 '10 at 23:54
    
To get you started, you have to know to distinguish strings (the bits enclosed in quotes, in my test cases) and numeric values (the numbers not enclosed in quotes). Your str2num and num2str functions have to convert one form to the other. –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 19 '10 at 23:55
    
In Python, you can use str('1234') and str(1234) (for example) to tell you which is which. –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 19 '10 at 23:56
    
I suppose what I'm trying to ask is "What is assert? How is it used?". I'm really not getting the code. I don't see any calculations or anything like that, which comes back to my biggest problem, how to take the left digit and multiply, then add the right, and continue to the end of the number. –  Just a Student Oct 19 '10 at 23:59

int() can convert strings from any base between 2 and 36. If you need a wider range than that then create a string containing the digits and use the index() method to get the value.

share|improve this answer
    
Surely, for a homework problem, you aren't allowed to use shortcuts like int()? ;-) –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 19 '10 at 23:57
    
@Chris: Learning how to use the built-in facilities is an important part of learning the language. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 19 '10 at 23:58
1  
Yes, if the aim of the course is learning the language. But if the aim is actually to understand the operation of base conversion, with the language as purely a vehicle for practising that understanding, then the course requirements will reflect that. –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 19 '10 at 23:59
    
My professor discourages most shortcuts or unnecessary modules. He wants us to manually code in any calculations. –  Just a Student Oct 20 '10 at 0:02
    
@Just a Student: int() is built-in to Python, no modules needed. –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 20 '10 at 0:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.