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I need my bat file to accept multiple optional named arguments.

mycmd.bat man1 man2 -username alice -otheroption

For example my command has 2 mandatory parameters, and two optional parameters (-username) that has an argument value of alice, and -otheroption:

I'd like to be able to pluck these values into variables.

Just putting out a call to anyone that has already solved this. Man these bat files are a pain.

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This page is promising: pcguide.com/vb/showthread.php?t=52323 –  Ash Kim Oct 20 '10 at 0:16
5  
Any reason why you have to do this in a BAT file and not say in VBScript? There may be a way to do this in a BAT file, but sticking to the BAT file approach, you "you're entering a world of pain, son". :-) –  Alek Davis Oct 20 '10 at 0:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Though I tend to agree with @AlekDavis, there are nonetheless several ways to do this in the NT shell.

The approach I would take advantage of the SHIFT command and IF conditional branching, something like this...

@ECHO OFF

SET man1=%1
SET man2=%2
SHIFT & SHIFT

:loop
IF NOT "%1"=="" (
    IF "%1"=="-username" (
        SET user=%2
        SHIFT
    )
    IF "%1"=="-otheroption" (
        SET other=%2
        SHIFT
    )
    SHIFT
    GOTO :loop
)

ECHO Man1 = %man1%
ECHO Man2 = %man2%
ECHO Username = %user%
ECHO Other option = %other%

REM ...do stuff here...

:theend
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ewall - one small error at line 4 - SET man2=%1 –  Ash Kim Oct 21 '10 at 0:55
    
Ah, right... fixing it now. –  ewall Oct 21 '10 at 3:29
    
SHIFT /2 shifts starting at arg 2. It does not shift two times. Shouldn't it be replaced with SHIFT & SHIFT? –  dbenham Nov 17 '11 at 4:38
2  
OK - I see why the code usually works - the SHIFT in the loop eventually moves the options to arg 1 and no harm is done (usually). But the initial SHIFT /2 is definitely a bug that will corrupt the results if arg 1 value happens to match one of the option names. Try running mycmd.bat -username anyvalue -username myName -otheroption othervalue. The result should be user=myName, other=othervalue; but the code gives user=-username, other=othervalue. The bug is fixed by replacing SHIFT /2 with SHIFT & SHIFT. –  dbenham Nov 18 '11 at 1:15
2  
@Christian - ewall is incorrect about ; - it cannot be used in place of &. –  dbenham Nov 10 '12 at 16:28

The selected answer works, but it could use some improvement.

  • The options should probably be initialized to default values.
  • It would be nice to preserve %0 as well as the required args %1 and %2.
  • It becomes a pain to have an IF block for every option, especially as the number of options grows.
  • It would be nice to have a simple and concise way to quickly define all options and defaults in one place.
  • It would be good to support stand-alone options that serve as flags (no value following the option).
  • We don't know if an arg is enclosed in quotes. Nor do we know if an arg value was passed using escaped characters. Better to access an arg using %~1 and enclose the assignment within quotes. Then the batch can rely on the absence of enclosing quotes, but special characters are still generally safe without escaping. (This is not bullet proof, but it handles most situations)

My solution relies on the creation of an OPTIONS variable that defines all of the options and their defaults. OPTIONS is also used to test whether a supplied option is valid. A tremendous amount of code is saved by simply storing the option values in variables named the same as the option. The amount of code is constant regardless of how many options are defined; only the OPTIONS definition has to change.

@echo off
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion

:: Define the option names along with default values, using a <space>
:: delimiter between options. I'm using some generic option names, but 
:: normally each option would have a meaningful name.
::
:: Each option has the format -name:[default]
::
:: The option names are NOT case sensitive.
::
:: Options that have a default value expect the subsequent command line
:: argument to contain the value. If the option is not provided then the
:: option is set to the default. If the default contains spaces, contains
:: special characters, or starts with a colon, then it should be enclosed
:: within double quotes. The default can be undefined by specifying the
:: default as empty quotes "".
:: NOTE - defaults cannot contain * or ? with this solution.
::
:: Options that are specified without any default value are simply flags
:: that are either defined or undefined. All flags start out undefined by
:: default and become defined if the option is supplied.
::
:: The order of the definitions is not important.
::
set "options=-username:/ -option2:"" -option3:"three word default" -flag1: -flag2:"

:: Set the default option values
for %%O in (%options%) do for /f "tokens=1,* delims=:" %%A in ("%%O") do set "%%A=%%~B"

:loop
:: Validate and store the options, one at a time, using a loop.
:: Options start at arg 3 in this example. Each SHIFT is done starting at
:: the first option so required args are preserved.
::
if not "%~3"=="" (
  set "test=!options:*%~3:=! "
  if "!test!"=="!options! " (
    rem No substitution was made so this is an invalid option.
    rem Error handling goes here.
    rem I will simply echo an error message.
    echo Error: Invalid option %~3
  ) else if "!test:~0,1!"==" " (
    rem Set the flag option using the option name.
    rem The value doesn't matter, it just needs to be defined.
    set "%~3=1"
  ) else (
    rem Set the option value using the option as the name.
    rem and the next arg as the value
    set "%~3=%~4"
    shift /3
  )
  shift /3
  goto :loop
)

:: Now all supplied options are stored in variables whose names are the
:: option names. Missing options have the default value, or are undefined if
:: there is no default.
:: The required args are still available in %1 and %2 (and %0 is also preserved)
:: For this example I will simply echo all the option values,
:: assuming any variable starting with - is an option.
::
set -

:: To get the value of a single parameter, just remember to include the `-`
echo The value of -username is: !-username!

There really isn't that much code. Most of the code above is comments. Here is the exact same code, without the comments.

@echo off
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion

set "options=-username:/ -option2:"" -option3:"three word default" -flag1: -flag2:"

for %%O in (%options%) do for /f "tokens=1,* delims=:" %%A in ("%%O") do set "%%A=%%~B"
:loop
if not "%~3"=="" (
  set "test=!options:*%~3:=! "
  if "!test!"=="!options! " (
      echo Error: Invalid option %~3
  ) else if "!test:~0,1!"==" " (
      set "%~3=1"
  ) else (
      set "%~3=%~4"
      shift /3
  )
  shift /3
  goto :loop
)
set -

:: To get the value of a single parameter, just remember to include the `-`
echo The value of -username is: !-username!


This solution provides Unix style arguments within a Windows batch. This is not the norm for Windows - batch usually has the options preceding the required arguments and the options are prefixed with /.

The techniques used in this solution are easily adapted for a Windows style of options.

  • The parsing loop always looks for an option at %1, and it continues until arg 1 does not begin with /
  • Note that SET assignments must be enclosed within quotes if the name begins with /.
    SET /VAR=VALUE fails
    SET "/VAR=VALUE" works. I am already doing this in my solution anyway.
  • The standard Windows style precludes the possibility of the first required argument value starting with /. This limitation can be eliminated by employing an implicitly defined // option that serves as a signal to exit the option parsing loop. Nothing would be stored for the // "option".
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for very ellegant solution, i like this more than the one accepted as answer. Only thing you missed is to say how to use the named parameters in the batch script, for example echo %-username% –  Roboblob Jan 10 '13 at 10:11
1  
+1 Nicely done. We shall call this...getopts.bat –  Amit Naidu Jun 10 '13 at 1:35

If you want to use optional arguments, but not named arguments, then this approach worked for me. I think this is much easier code to follow.

REM Get argument values.  If not specified, use default values.
IF "%1"=="" ( SET "DatabaseServer=localhost" ) ELSE ( SET "DatabaseServer=%1" )
IF "%2"=="" ( SET "DatabaseName=MyDatabase" ) ELSE ( SET "DatabaseName=%2" )

REM Do work
ECHO Database Server = %DatabaseServer%
ECHO Database Name   = %DatabaseName%
share|improve this answer
    
IF "%1"=="" will fail if argument contains quotes itself. Just use any other non-special symbol instead, like ._=[]# etc –  Fr0sT Jun 20 at 7:08
    
I don't think this works unless the user knows to use "" in place of an argument. Otherwise, how can I ever set a DB name but leave the DB server blank? –  Sean Long Nov 20 at 20:02

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