Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using the "Alternating Rows" option in Interface Builder to get alternating row colors on an NSTableView. Is there any way to change the colors of the alternating rows?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

If you want to use an undocumented way, make a NSColor category and override _blueAlternatingRowColor like this:

@implementation NSColor (ColorChangingFun)

+(NSColor*)_blueAlternatingRowColor
{
    return [NSColor redColor];
}

@end

or to change both colors, override controlAlternatingRowBackgroundColors to return an array of colors you want alternated.

@implementation NSColor (ColorChangingFun)

+(NSArray*)controlAlternatingRowBackgroundColors
{
    return [NSArray arrayWithObjects:[NSColor redColor], [NSColor greenColor], nil];
}

@end
share|improve this answer
1  
Why hack when the API gives you a way? –  Joshua Nozzi Oct 20 '10 at 1:05
    
um, because it's fun ;) ROFL –  Ken Aspeslagh Oct 20 '10 at 1:22
    
This works, but it only changes one of the colors. –  indragie Oct 20 '10 at 4:27
    
You want to change the white color too? What are you doing this for exactly? –  Ken Aspeslagh Oct 20 '10 at 18:39
    
Why would someone down-vote my answer? –  Ken Aspeslagh Oct 20 '10 at 18:40
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Found a better way to do it here. That method overrides the highlightSelectionInClipRect: method in an NSTableView subclass so you can use any color you want for the alternating rows. It's not as hackish as using an NSColor category, and it only affects table views you choose.

share|improve this answer
    
+100 I came across this question a few days ago hoping for a good answer, but didn't find a satisfactory one. Thankfully, I happened to see it come up again! Thanks! –  Dave DeLong Oct 26 '10 at 5:17
1  
This didn't quite work for me. It looks fine unless you start scrolling up and down with the scrollbar. Then the re-drawing gets messed up and you end up with lots of horizontal white lines in the colored rows. I put my implementation below, but it's so simple that I wonder if I'm missing something. –  sam Feb 24 '11 at 19:40

I subclassed NSTableView and implemented drawRow:clipRect: like this...

- (void)drawRow:(NSInteger)row clipRect:(NSRect)clipRect
{
    NSColor *color = (row % 2) ? [NSColor redColor] : [NSColor whiteColor];
    [color setFill];
    NSRectFill([self rectOfRow:row]);
    [super drawRow:row clipRect:clipRect];
}

It seems to work, but it's so simple that I'm wondering if I'm missing something.

share|improve this answer
2  
Unfortunately it doesn't provide alternating colors for empty rows, only rows which contain data. –  Huperniketes Jun 10 '11 at 2:12
1  
This worked well for me. You may want to wrap the first three lines in an if (row != [self selectedRow]) to prevent issues with the highlighted background of selected rows. –  pepsi Jun 12 '12 at 15:44
1  
@Huperniketes Check this question for a solution to also custom draw the table view background w/o rows –  Jay Jun 6 '13 at 5:32
    
Note that this method should only be used for cell-based table views. According to the docs: "This method should not be subclassed or overridden for a "View Based TableView". Instead, row drawing customization can be done by subclassing NSTableRowView." –  Z S Mar 10 at 3:03

There is no settable property for this, however you can respond to the delegate method -tableView:willDisplayCell:forTableColumn:row: and set the cell's background color based on the evenness of the row number.

share|improve this answer
2  
This doesn't seem to work when there are no cells in the table view (doesn't change the background of the table view itself) –  indragie Oct 20 '10 at 4:07

I'm not sure how recently this was added, or if it is as flexible as you need it to be, but I noticed that you can specify "Alternating" rows in Interface Builder in Xcode 4.6 (and possibly earlier).

  1. Open your nib in Xcode and select your NSTableView or NSOutlineView
  2. Show the Attributes Inspector in the Utilities Pane (⎇⌘4)
  3. Notice the Highlight Alternating Rows checkbox.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is the option I was using (it's been around for a while). The problem was being able to customize the alternating colours since ticking that box just gives you the default light blue/white system colours. –  indragie Jun 23 '13 at 17:36

I wanted a solution that worked just like the regular NSTableView, including support for elastic scrolling and such, so I created an NSTableView subclass that has an NSColor* property called alternateBackgroundColor, and then overrode the -drawBackgroundColorInClipRect: method like so:

- (void) drawBackgroundInClipRect:(NSRect)clipRect {
    if([self alternateBackgroundColor] == nil) {
        // If we didn't set the alternate colour, fall back to the default behaviour
        [super drawBackgroundInClipRect:clipRect];
    } else {
        // Fill in the background colour
        [[self backgroundColor] set];
        NSRectFill(clipRect);

        // Check if we should be drawing alternating coloured rows
        if([self alternateBackgroundColor] && [self usesAlternatingRowBackgroundColors]) {
            // Set the alternating background colour
            [[self alternateBackgroundColor] set];

            // Go through all of the intersected rows and draw their rects
            NSRect checkRect = [self bounds];
            checkRect.origin.y = clipRect.origin.y;
            checkRect.size.height = clipRect.size.height;
            NSRange rowsToDraw = [self rowsInRect:checkRect];
            NSUInteger curRow = rowsToDraw.location;
            while(curRow < rowsToDraw.location + rowsToDraw.length) {
                if(curRow % 2 != 0) {
                    // This is an alternate row
                    NSRect rowRect = [self rectOfRow:curRow];
                    rowRect.origin.x = clipRect.origin.x;
                    rowRect.size.width = clipRect.size.width;
                    NSRectFill(rowRect);
                }

                curRow++;
            }

            // Figure out the height of "off the table" rows
            CGFloat rowHeight = [self rowHeight];
            if( ([self gridStyleMask] & NSTableViewSolidHorizontalGridLineMask) == NSTableViewSolidHorizontalGridLineMask
               || ([self gridStyleMask] & NSTableViewDashedHorizontalGridLineMask) == NSTableViewDashedHorizontalGridLineMask) {
                rowHeight += 2.0f; // Compensate for a grid
            }

            // Draw fake rows below the table's last row
            CGFloat virtualRowOrigin = 0.0f;
            NSInteger virtualRowNumber = [self numberOfRows];
            if([self numberOfRows] > 0) {
                NSRect finalRect = [self rectOfRow:[self numberOfRows]-1];
                virtualRowOrigin = finalRect.origin.y + finalRect.size.height;
            }
            while(virtualRowOrigin < clipRect.origin.y + clipRect.size.height) {
                if(virtualRowNumber % 2 != 0) {
                    // This is an alternate row
                    NSRect virtualRowRect = NSMakeRect(clipRect.origin.x,virtualRowOrigin,clipRect.size.width,rowHeight);
                    NSRectFill(virtualRowRect);
                }

                virtualRowNumber++;
                virtualRowOrigin += rowHeight;
            }

            // Draw fake rows above the table's first row
            virtualRowOrigin = -1 * rowHeight;
            virtualRowNumber = -1;
            while(virtualRowOrigin + rowHeight > clipRect.origin.y) {
                if(abs(virtualRowNumber) % 2 != 0) {
                    // This is an alternate row
                    NSRect virtualRowRect = NSMakeRect(clipRect.origin.x,virtualRowOrigin,clipRect.size.width,rowHeight);
                    NSRectFill(virtualRowRect);
                }

                virtualRowNumber--;
                virtualRowOrigin -= rowHeight;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
To make this work I had to disable usesAlternatingRowBackgroundColors and take the conditional check out. Otherwise, the table view was drawing over the top of this and I only saw the drawn virtual rows beyond the table bounds. –  greg Oct 15 '12 at 1:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.