Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Tags can have multiple attributes. The order in which attributes appear in the code does not matter. For example:

<a href="#" title="#">
<a title="#" href="#">

How can I "normalize" the HTML in Javascript, so the order of the attributes is always the same? I don't care which order is chosen, as long as it is always the same.

UPDATE: my original goal was to make it easier to diff (in JavaScript) 2 HTML pages with slight differences. Because users could use different software to edit the code, the order of the attributes could change. This make the diff too verbose.

ANSWER: Well, first thanks for all the answers. And YES, it is possible. Here is how I've managed to do it. This is a proof of concept, it can certainly be optimized:

function sort_attributes(a, b) {
  if( a.name == b.name) {
    return 0;
  }

  return (a.name < b.name) ? -1 : 1;
}

$("#original").find('*').each(function() {
  if (this.attributes.length > 1) {
    var attributes = this.attributes;
    var list = [];

    for(var i =0; i < attributes.length; i++) {
      list.push(attributes[i]);
    }

    list.sort(sort_attributes);

    for(var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
      this.removeAttribute(list[i].name, list[i].value);
    }

    for(var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
      this.setAttribute(list[i].name, list[i].value);
    }
  }
});

Same thing for the second element of the diff, $('#different'). Now $('#original').html() and $('#different').html() show HTML code with attributes in the same order.

share|improve this question
59  
What is the need for this? –  rahul Oct 20 '10 at 4:21
40  
@rahul: actually there is a pretty interesting need for this: it can greatly improve the gzip compression of your pages. –  haylem Oct 20 '10 at 4:32
11  
ah, in Javascript... so much for compression. No idea what the need is then. –  haylem Oct 20 '10 at 4:33
13  
@Julien: By the time your JavaScript code runs, the page has already been sent to the client. I don't see how it can help in compression then. –  casablanca Oct 20 '10 at 4:36
21  
There's actually a valid use for trying to do what the OP asks. Using a WYSIWYG editor to drive a wiki. The project I'm working on does exactly that, and the editor would reverse the order of attributes every time you edited the wiki, resulting in unnecessary diffs. I ending up alphabetically sorting attributes in the submitted HTML on the backend before saving to avoid diffs; could have just as easily done that sort in javascript before submitting. –  Frank Farmer Oct 20 '10 at 16:57
show 15 more comments

8 Answers

JavaScript doesn't actually see a web page in the form of text-based HTML, but rather as a tree structure known as the DOM, or Document Object Model. The order of HTML element attributes in the DOM is not defined (in fact, as Svend comments, they're not even part of the DOM), so the idea of sorting them at the point where JavaScript runs is irrelevant.

I can only guess what you're trying to achieve. If you're trying to do this to improve JavaScript/page performance, most HTML document renderers already presumably put a lot of effort into optimising attribute access, so there's little to be gained there.

If you're trying to order attributes to make gzip compression of pages more effective as they're sent over the wire, understand that JavaScript runs after that point in time. Instead, you may want to look at things that run server-side instead, though it's probably more trouble than it's worth.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree!!...... –  Trufa Oct 20 '10 at 13:31
8  
JavaScript can run server-side. –  Matt Kantor Oct 20 '10 at 15:30
    
Attributes are not considered part of the document tree (which uses ordering naturally). So while Attr inherits the Node interface, DOM Core 2 specifies these fields to be null for attributes w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-2-Core/core.html#ID-637646024 –  Svend Oct 20 '10 at 17:37
    
@Matt: That's true, but not what the OP meant, I'm sure... –  Sasha Chedygov Oct 21 '10 at 4:28
add comment

Take the HTML and parse into a DOM structure. Then take the DOM structure, and write it back out to HTML. While writing, sort the attributes using any stable sort. Your HTML will now be normalized with regard to attributes.

This is a general way to normalize things. (parse non-normalized data, then write it back out in normalized form).

I'm not sure why you'd want to Normalize HTML, but there you have it. Data is data. ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have a code example. I tried to do do something similar, it did not work. –  Julien Oct 21 '10 at 4:14
add comment
up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is a proof of concept, it can certainly be optimized:

function sort_attributes(a, b) {
  if( a.name == b.name) {
    return 0;
  }

  return (a.name < b.name) ? -1 : 1;
 }

$("#original").find('*').each(function() {
  if (this.attributes.length > 1) {
    var attributes = this.attributes;
    var list = [];

    for(var i =0; i < attributes.length; i++) {
      list.push(attributes[i]);
    }

     list.sort(sort_attributes);

    for(var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
      this.removeAttribute(list[i].name, list[i].value);
    }

     for(var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
       this.setAttribute(list[i].name, list[i].value);
    }
  }
 });

Same thing for the second element of the diff, $('#different'). Now $('#original').html() and $('#different').html() show HTML code with attributes in the same order.

share|improve this answer
    
I think better if you generate your html contents in XML and then render it using xslt. You will surely get nicer output. –  Nasaralla Oct 6 '11 at 14:41
add comment

you can try open HTML tab in firebug, the attributes are always in same order

share|improve this answer
4  
This isn't really helpful on its own. That's because it is re-creating the HTML from the DOM, and however this happens has a particular attribute iteration order (or Firebug sorts them manually). Julien could take advantage of this and use the same method to write out HTML. –  Matt Kantor Oct 20 '10 at 15:32
add comment

Actually, I can think of a few good reasons. One would be comparison for identity matching and for use with 'diff' type tools where it is quite annoying that semantically equivalent lines can be marked as "different".

The real question is "Why in Javascript"?

This question "smells" of "I have a problem and I think I have an answer...but I have a problem with my answer, too."

If the OP would explain why they want to do this, their chances of getting a good answer would go up dramatically.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The question "What is the need for this?" Answer: It makes the code more readable and easier to understand.

Why most UI sucks... Many programmers fail to understand the need for simplifying the users job. In this case, the users job is reading and understanding the code. One reason to order the attributes is for the human who has to debug and maintain the code. An ordered list, which the program becomes familiar with, makes his job easier. He can more quickly find attributes, or realize which attributes are missing, and more quickly change attribute values.

share|improve this answer
    
Methinks you have not thought about the question for long enough; even a working solution to the question would not address what you say here, true though it may be. –  Clint Tseng Oct 20 '10 at 19:24
    
Why do you suppose that the OP would want to do this with Javascript? It's possible that a server-side (build time?) Javascript solution was in mind, but it's unlikely that somebody experienced enough to do that would have failed to mention it in a Stackoverflow post. It's also possible that the OP is implementing an in-browser HTML editor, but that also seems doubtful. –  Pointy Oct 20 '10 at 22:27
add comment

This only matters when someone is reading the source, so for me it's semantic attributes first, less semantic ones next...

There are exceptions of course, if you have for example consecutive <li>'s, all with one attribute on each and others only on some, you may want to ensure the shared ones are all at the start, followed by individual ones, eg.

<li a="x">A</li>
<li a="y" b="t">B</li>
<li a="z">C</li>

(Even if the "b" attribute is more semantically useful than "a")

You get the idea.

share|improve this answer
add comment

it is actually possible, I think, if the html contents are passed as xml and rendered through xslt... therefore your original content in XML can be in whatever order you want.

share|improve this answer
add comment

protected by Will Oct 21 '10 at 13:13

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.