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In MongoDB, is it possible to update the value of a field using the value from another field? The equivalent SQL would be something like:

UPDATE Person SET Name = FirstName + ' ' + LastName

And the MongoDB pseudo-code would be:

db.person.update( {}, { $set : { name : firstName + ' ' + lastName } );
share|improve this question
1  
Good question. Maybe you need to wait for / vote for jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-458 – Thilo Oct 20 '10 at 6:04
1  
+1 to the question - the only way I can think of it is to pull the object locally and use that to update the field, or have an obscenely nested update call that I'm not sure mongo even supports. – nearlymonolith Oct 20 '10 at 6:50
1  
The precise feature request is jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-11345 - still open, not yet triaged. – vincebowdren Feb 16 at 15:15
up vote 49 down vote accepted

You cannot refer to the document itself in an update (yet). You'll need to iterate through the documents and update each document using a function. See this answer for an example, or this one for server-side eval().

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14  
Is this still valid today? – Christian Engel Jan 12 '13 at 22:08
1  
@ChristianEngel: It appears so. I wasn't able to find anything in the MongoDB docs that mentions a reference to the current document in an update operation. This related feature request is still unresolved as well. – Niels van der Rest Jan 14 '13 at 12:28
    
is anyone else really damn confused about what's going on in the comments of that thread?...some guy just randomly brought up foreign key constraints as a reason to be concerned about having $function o_OOOO also I was hoping this would be in 3.0 but no dice =/ – jtmarmon Mar 16 '15 at 22:04

You should iterate through. For your specific case:

db.person.find().snapshot().forEach(
    function (elem) {
        db.person.update(
            {
                _id: elem._id
            },
            {
                $set: {
                    name: elem.firstname + ' ' + elem.lastname
                }
            }
        );
    }
);
share|improve this answer
3  
What happens if another user has changed the document between your find() and your save()? – UpTheCreek Feb 15 '13 at 11:33
3  
True, but copying between fields should not require transactions to be atomic. – UpTheCreek Feb 19 '13 at 9:25
2  
It's important to notice that save() fully replaces the document. Should use update() instead. – EdMelo Mar 22 '13 at 21:44
9  
How about db.person.update( { _id: elem._id }, { $set: { name: elem.firstname + ' ' + elem.lastname } } ); – Philipp Jardas Aug 19 '13 at 13:34
1  
+1. Wrong format for update, doesn't work as currently formulated. – hedefalk Sep 5 '13 at 9:46

For a database with high activity, you may run into issues where your updates affect actively changing records and for this reason I recommend using snapshot()

db.person.find().snapshot().forEach( function (hombre) {
    hombre.name = hombre.firstName + ' ' + hombre.lastName; 
    db.person.save(hombre); 
});

http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/method/cursor.snapshot/

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I tried the above solution but I found it unsuitable for large amounts of data. I then discovered the stream feature:

MongoClient.connect("...", function(err, db){
    var c = db.collection('yourCollection');
    var s = c.find({/* your query */}).stream();
    s.on('data', function(doc){
        c.update({_id: doc._id}, {$set: {name : doc.firstName + ' ' + doc.lastName}}, function(err, result) { /* result == true? */} }
    });
    s.on('end', function(){
        // stream can end before all your updates do if you have a lot
    })
})
share|improve this answer

Actually the best way to this is to $project your documents and use the $concat string aggregation operator to return the concatenated string. From there, you then iterate the cursor and use the $set update operator to add the new field to your documents using bulk operations for maximum efficiency.

Aggregation query:

var cursor = db.collection.aggregate([ 
    { "$project":  { 
        "name": { "$concat": [ "$firstName", " ", "$lastName" ] } 
    }}
])

MongoDB server version 3.2 or newer

from this, you need to use the bulkWrite method.

var requests = [];
cursor.forEach(document => { 
    requests.push( { 
        'updateOne': {
            'filter': { '_id': document._id },
            'update': { '$set': { 'name': document.name } }
        }
    });
    if (requests.length === 500) {
        //Execute per 500 operations and re-init
        db.collection.bulkWrite(requests);
        requests = [];
    }
});

if(requests.length > 0) {
     db.collection.bulkWrite(requests);
}

MongoDB server version 2.6 => 3.0

From this version you need to use the now deprecated Bulk API and its associated methods.

var bulk = db.collection.initializeUnorderedBulOp();
var count = 0;

cursor.forEach(function(document) { 
    bulk.find({ '_id': document._id }).updateOne( {
        '$set': { 'name': document.name }
    });
    count++;
    if(count%500 === 0) {
        // Excecute per 500 operations and re-init
        bulk.execute();
        bulk = db.collection.initializeUnorderedBulkOp();
    }
})

// clean up queues
if(count > 0) {
    bulk.execute();
}

MongoDB server version 2.4

cursor["result"].forEach(function(document) {
    db.collection.update(
        { "_id": document._id }, 
        { "$set": { "name": document.name } }
    );
})
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Here's what we came up with for copying one field to another for ~150_000 records. It took about 6 minutes, but is still significantly less resource intensive than it would have been to instantiate and iterate over the same number of ruby objects.

js_query = %({
  $or : [
    {
      'settings.mobile_notifications' : { $exists : false },
      'settings.mobile_admin_notifications' : { $exists : false }
    }
  ]
})

js_for_each = %(function(user) {
  if (!user.settings.hasOwnProperty('mobile_notifications')) {
    user.settings.mobile_notifications = user.settings.email_notifications;
  }
  if (!user.settings.hasOwnProperty('mobile_admin_notifications')) {
    user.settings.mobile_admin_notifications = user.settings.email_admin_notifications;
  }
  db.users.save(user);
})

js = "db.users.find(#{js_query}).forEach(#{js_for_each});"
Mongoid::Sessions.default.command('$eval' => js)
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