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I am trying to overload the = operator on a simple C++ class called Set that contains a dynamic array of ints. For the = operator, I first want to check for self assignment, so I wanted to compare 2 pointers to make see if they have the same memory address. Here's the code:

Set& Set::operator=(const Set& setEqual)
{
//first check for self assignment
if(setEqual == this*)
    cout << "this is self assignment";
}

The error spat out is error: expected primary-expression before ')' token

I believe I'm having a misunderstanding of pointers again, so if anyone could point (ha!) me in the right direction, I'd appreciate it.

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2  
If you use the copy-and-swap idiom you don't need the self assignment test (and you get lots of other benefits). –  James McNellis Oct 20 '10 at 5:49
2  
4th line: To dereference a pointer you put * before the variable name, so it's *variableName, not variableName* –  Warty Oct 20 '10 at 5:50
    
"This*" just reminds of "This is star plus, and you are watching star movies." No offense only fun. –  Manoj R Oct 20 '10 at 5:55
    
Use the copy-and-swap idiom, you're off track trying to do it this way. –  GManNickG Oct 20 '10 at 6:13
    
I will definitely look into the copy and swap idiom, didn't know that took care of everything. Thanks for the link! –  Ross Hettel Oct 20 '10 at 6:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To detect self-assignment you need

if(&setEqual == this)

you should never use

if(setEqual == *this)

for detecting self-assignment as the latter statement will invoke comparison of the objects, which might be overloaded in the way you don't expect and is likely slower as well.

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Thanks, that helps. I am overloading the ++ operator in this class too, so I will definitely do it the first way. –  Ross Hettel Oct 20 '10 at 6:33

The error is becuase this* is not valid - * is either infix (in multiplication) or prefix (in dereferencing pointers).

You probably want &setEqual == this - that is assigning from an object at the same memory address or setEqual==*this - comparing equality using whatever operator== you have defined

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No, it would be silly to compare the sets. To avoid self-assignment he wants to compare pointers to the set objects, i.e. this == &setEqual. But as remarked for the question, he'd be better off using the copy-and-swap idiom (in particular for exception safety). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 20 '10 at 5:54
    
I didn't even read what he was comparing, i just saw the syntax error and then gave the two possible (syntactically) correct ways of comparing equality. regardless, i feel its better to be complete - maybe he does want them compared as equal if both sets contain the name ethel, he didn't say! –  tobyodavies Oct 20 '10 at 5:58
    
Hey thanks, that worked out. I'm still iffy on pointer symantics. That's a good explanation on where I should put the * and why. –  Ross Hettel Oct 20 '10 at 6:34

If you want to compare the address of the thing pointed too you really want this:

Set& Set::operator=(const Set& setEqual)
{
//first check for self assignment
if(&setEqual == this)
    cout << "this is self assignment";
}

Using (setEqual==*this) as sugested by some of the solutions compares if the objects are equal under operator==.

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