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I've got an enum like this:

public enum MyLovelyEnum
{
  FirstSelection,
  TheOtherSelection,
  YetAnotherOne
};

I got a property in my DataContext:

public MyLovelyEnum VeryLovelyEnum { get; set; }

And I got three RadioButtons in my WPF client.

<RadioButton Margin="3">First Selection</RadioButton>
<RadioButton Margin="3">The Other Selection</RadioButton>
<RadioButton Margin="3">Yet Another one</RadioButton>

Now how do I bind the RadioButtons to the property for proper two-way-binding?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 216 down vote accepted

You could use a more generic converter

public class EnumBooleanConverter : IValueConverter
{
  #region IValueConverter Members
  public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
  {
    string parameterString = parameter as string;
    if (parameterString == null)
      return DependencyProperty.UnsetValue;

    if (Enum.IsDefined(value.GetType(), value) == false)
      return DependencyProperty.UnsetValue;

    object parameterValue = Enum.Parse(value.GetType(), parameterString);

    return parameterValue.Equals(value);
  }

  public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
  {
    string parameterString = parameter as string;
    if (parameterString == null)
        return DependencyProperty.UnsetValue;

    return Enum.Parse(targetType, parameterString);
  }
  #endregion
}

And in the XAML-Part you use:

<Grid>
    <Grid.Resources>
      <l:EnumBooleanConverter x:Key="enumBooleanConverter" />
    </Grid.Resources>
    <StackPanel >
      <RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=VeryLovelyEnum, Converter={StaticResource enumBooleanConverter}, ConverterParameter=FirstSelection}">first selection</RadioButton>
      <RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=VeryLovelyEnum, Converter={StaticResource enumBooleanConverter}, ConverterParameter=TheOtherSelection}">the other selection</RadioButton>
      <RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=VeryLovelyEnum, Converter={StaticResource enumBooleanConverter}, ConverterParameter=YetAnotherOne}">yet another one</RadioButton>
    </StackPanel>
</Grid>
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25  
Worked like a charm for me. As an addition I modified ConvertBack to also return UnsetValue on "false", because silverlight (and presumably WPF proper) calls the converter twice - once when unsetting the old radio button value and again to set the new one. I was hanging other things off the property setter so I only wanted it called once. -- if (parameterString == null || value.Equals(false)) return DependencyProperty.UnsetValue; –  MarcE Feb 14 '10 at 14:44
    
Excelellent! works out of the box! +1 –  Oscar Cabrero Mar 19 '10 at 6:42
3  
From what I can tell, this must be done unless the radio buttons are in different groups (and AFAIK buttons without GroupName set that have the same parent are by default in the same group). Otherwise, the calls to set the property "bounce" and result in odd behavior. –  nlawalker May 27 '10 at 20:15
    
yes but if you call Unset in the converter when setting to false, then it is not a true EnumToBooleanConverter but more a EnumToRadioButtonConverter. So instead I check if the value is different in my property setter : if (_myEnumBackingField == value) return; –  Stephane Mar 24 '11 at 12:55
1  
The binding on this solution only works correctly one-way. I could not programmatically toggle the radiobutton by assigning the binded property to a different value. If you want a proper working AND better solution, use scott's approach. –  l46kok Oct 16 '12 at 0:28

You can further simplify the accepted answer. Instead of typing out the enums as strings in xaml and doing more work in your converter than needed, you can explicitly pass in the enum value instead of a string representation, and as CrimsonX commented, errors get thrown at compile time rather than runtime:

ConverterParameter={x:Static local:YourEnumType.Enum1}

<StackPanel>
    <StackPanel.Resources>          
        <local:EnumToBooleanConverter x:Key="EnumToBooleanConverter" />          
    </StackPanel.Resources>
    <RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=YourEnumProperty, Converter={StaticResource EnumToBooleanConverter}, ConverterParameter={x:Static local:YourEnumType.Enum1}}" />
    <RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=YourEnumProperty, Converter={StaticResource EnumToBooleanConverter}, ConverterParameter={x:Static local:YourEnumType.Enum2}}" />
</StackPanel>

Then simplify the converter:

public class EnumToBooleanConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return value.Equals(parameter);
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return value.Equals(true) ? parameter : Binding.DoNothing;
    }
}

Note - Multiple groups of RadioButtons in same container (Feb 17 '11):

In xaml, if radio buttons share the same parent container, then selecting one will de-select all other's within that container (even if they are bound to a different property). So try to keep your RadioButton's that are bound to a common property grouped together in their own container like a stack panel. In cases where your related RadioButtons cannot share a single parent container, then set the GroupName property of each RadioButton to a common value to logically group them.

Note - Enum type nested in a class (Apr 28 '11):

If your enum type is nested in a class (rather than directly in the namespace), you might be able to use the '+' syntax to access the enum in XAML as stated in a (not marked) answer to the question Unable to find enum type for static reference in WPF:

ConverterParameter={x:Static local:YourClass+YourNestedEnumType.Enum1}

Due to this Microsoft Connect Issue, however, the designer in VS2010 will no longer load stating "Type 'local:YourClass+YourNestedEnumType' was not found.", but the project does compile and run successfully. Of course, you can avoid this issue if you are able move your enum type to the namespace directly.

Edit (Dec 16 '10):

Thanks to anon for suggesting returning Binding.DoNothing rather than DependencyProperty.UnsetValue.

Edit (Apr 5 '11):

Simplified ConvertBack's if-else to use a Ternary Operator.

Edit (Jan 27 '12):

If using Enum flags, the converter would be as follows:

public class EnumToBooleanConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return ((Enum)value).HasFlag((Enum)parameter);
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return value.Equals(true) ? parameter : Binding.DoNothing;
    }
}
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2  
Simpler solution, I like it and it worked well. –  Steve Cadwallader Aug 18 '10 at 16:57
13  
I agree, I believe this is a better solution. Also, using this conversion will cause the project to break at compile time, not run time, if the enumeration values are changed, which is a big advantage. –  CrimsonX Oct 20 '10 at 23:01
1  
This is certainly a much better solution than the accepted one. +1 –  OrPaz Jul 3 '11 at 13:38
5  
Nice solution. I would add that this is really just a comparison converter comparing 2 values. It could have a more generic name than EnumToBooleanConverter such as ComparisonConverter –  MikeKulls Jul 14 '11 at 6:53
3  
@ Scott, Very nice. This converter is good in any cases, with or without Flags attribute. But it would be silly in most case to use this filter directly as converter with enum as flags. The reason is that you should achieve boolean calc (|= or ^=) with previous value to get proper result but converter does not have access to previous value. You then should add a bool for each enum value and do the proper boolean calc yourself in your MVVM model. But thanks for every info, very usefull. –  Eric Ouellet Apr 30 '12 at 20:57

For the EnumToBooleanConverter answer: Instead of returning DependencyProperty.UnsetValue consider returning Binding.DoNothing for the case where the radio button IsChecked value becomes false. The former indicates a problem (and might show the user a red rectangle or similar validation indicators) while the latter just indicates that nothing should be done, which is what is wanted in that case.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.data.ivalueconverter.convertback.aspx http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.data.binding.donothing.aspx

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thanks for the nice tip! –  Daniel Jan 8 '12 at 22:42

I would use the RadioButtons in a ListBox, and then bind to the SelectedValue.

This is an older thread about this topic, but the base idea should be the same: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wpf/thread/323d067a-efef-4c9f-8d99-fecf45522395/

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You get a working two-way-binding this way? –  Sam Dec 29 '08 at 11:56
    
I get a two-way binding doing a similar method using a ListBox and DataTemplate so you should. –  Bryan Anderson Jan 2 '09 at 15:29
    
This bug: geekswithblogs.net/claraoscura/archive/2008/10/17/125901.aspx ruined a day for me. –  Slampen Jun 3 '09 at 11:46
1  
This is by far the best solution, everything else causes redundant code. (Another example of using a ListBox) –  H.B. May 10 '12 at 23:30

Also you can create a custom control and you won't need to write so much code every time for general purposes Enum radio button control

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You could use the same solution that I suggested in this similar question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/326802/how-can-you-two-way-bind-a-checkbox-to-an-individual-bit-of-a-flags-enumeration#375288

Tip: Don't spend too much time looking at the question; just take a look at the accepted answer.

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Based on the EnumToBooleanConverter from Scott. I noticed that the ConvertBack method doesn't work on the Enum with flags code.

I've tried the following code:

public class EnumHasFlagToBooleanConverter : IValueConverter
    {
        private object _obj;
        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            _obj = value;
            return ((Enum)value).HasFlag((Enum)parameter);
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            if (value.Equals(true))
            {
                if (((Enum)_obj).HasFlag((Enum)parameter))
                {
                    // Do nothing
                    return Binding.DoNothing;
                }
                else
                {
                    int i = (int)_obj;
                    int ii = (int)parameter;
                    int newInt = i+ii;
                    return (NavigationProjectDates)newInt;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                if (((Enum)_obj).HasFlag((Enum)parameter))
                {
                    int i = (int)_obj;
                    int ii = (int)parameter;
                    int newInt = i-ii;
                    return (NavigationProjectDates)newInt;

                }
                else
                {
                    // do nothing
                    return Binding.DoNothing;
                }
            }
        }
    }

The only thing that I can't get to work is to do a cast from int to targetType so I made it hardcoded to NavigationProjectDates, the enum that I use. And, targetType == NavigationProjectDates...

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Somebody had edited my answer to add in the with Flags code, so honestly, I've never tried/used it myself and had considered removing it as I think it makes more sense as its own answer. If I can find some time later, I can try and put something together to test out that code as well as what you have and maybe help come to a better solution for your problem. –  Scott Jun 11 '13 at 14:04

Extended the great ideas above with the ability to bind radio buttons to any type (enumeration, Boolean, string, integer, etc.) and provided working sample code here:

http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/720497/Binding-Radio-Buttons-to-a-Single-Property

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