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I want to have a copy of the currently running instance.

When i change a value in the copy, original object is also affected. The copy acts as an instance.

How to avoid this? I need to create an independent copy of the calling object.

 Set operator+(Set s){
             Set temp = *this;  

             for(int i=0; s.elements[i] != '\0'; i++){
                     temp(s.elements[i]);
             }
             temp.elements[0] = 'X'; // <- this affects calling object also :(

             return temp;

         }
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What is this syntax? i mean temp(s.elements[i])?? it is not a function! –  A2B Oct 20 '10 at 8:07
    
Use the copy-and-swap idiom. –  GManNickG Oct 20 '10 at 8:54
    
@GMan: That's something to implement assignment. What's this got to do with operator+()? –  sbi Oct 20 '10 at 10:29
1  
@MSalters: Indeed, a lot easier! (Plus I'd call this the canonical implementation.) –  sbi Oct 20 '10 at 11:42
1  
@Sara @MSalters (Old, I know): operator+ should be a free-function. Generally, of the form: Set operator+(Set lhs, const Set& rhs) { lhs += rhs; return lhs; }; free-function should be used over member-functions, it allows a copy to be elided when you add to a temporary, and has the best performance in C++0x, where you guarantee moves both into and from the function. –  GManNickG Oct 30 '10 at 22:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The problem is that Set temp = *this; makes a shallow copy, not a deep copy. You will have to modify the copy constructor and assignment operators for the Set class so that they make copies of all the member/contained objects.

E.g:

class Set
{
public:
    Set()
    {
        elements = new SomeOtherObject[12];
        // Could make elements a std::vector<SomeOtherObject>, instead
    }

    Set(const Set& other)
    {
        AssignFrom(other);
    }

    Set& operator=(const Set& other)
    {
        AssignFrom(other);
        return *this;
    }

private:
    void AssignFrom(const Set& other)
    {
        // Make copies of entire array here, as deep as you need to.
        // You could simply do a top-level deep copy, if you control all the
        // other objects, and make them do top-level deep copies, as well
    }

    SomeOtherObject* elements;
};
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I had already overloaded = operator as i needed to do unions in sets. Set operator=(Set s){ elements = s.elements; //overrides element of "this" return *this; } –  coder9 Oct 20 '10 at 7:42
1  
@Sara: There's a difference between assignment (change an existing, initialized object) and copy-construction (initialize an object for the first time). If you need one, you likely need both plus the destructor. See The Rule of Three. –  sbi Oct 20 '10 at 7:49
    
+1 for shallow copy. –  A2B Oct 20 '10 at 7:56
    
thanks. i think i should go deep into theories first :) –  coder9 Oct 20 '10 at 8:02
3  
Please don't implement your Big Three this way. Use the copy-and-swap idiom. –  GManNickG Oct 20 '10 at 16:45

This probably depends on how Set is implemented. If the assignment operator and the copy constructor haven't been overloaded to do a deep copy(including elements) then it won't work as expected.

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Have you implemented a copy constructor for your class? Default copy constructor will copy any pointer in your class, but not the content you are pointing to. You need to create a copy constructor or overload the '=' operator.

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Not that your function already makes two copies, since it takes its argument and returns its result per copy:

Set operator+(Set s);

So you wouldn't have to copy s, because it's already copied. I suppose this is involuntarily, so you might want to read about how to pass objects to functions and how to return objects from function in C++.

The problem you're reporting, though, hints at your copy constructor not working properly. Did you implement the copy constructor or are you using the compiler-supplied one?

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Ok. I went through rule of three and did the following changes... Can you point out what's wrong with this?

#include<iostream>
#include<cstring>

using namespace std;

class Set{
  char *elements;

  public:
         Set() {
              elements = new char('\0');
              index = -1;
         }

         Set(const Set& cpy){
                  *this = cpy;
         }


         Set operator+(Set s){
             Set temp = *this;       // IMPORTANT! copy constructor of Set is called, "this" is passed as argument
                                     // * = current OBJECT, else returns ADDRESS of current object

             for(int i=0; s.elements[i] != '\0'; i++){
                     temp(s.elements[i]);
             }

             return temp;

         }
         Set& operator=(Set s){  
              delete [] elements;
             elements = new char[strlen(s.elements) + 1];
             strcpy(elements,  s.elements); //overrides element of "this"

             return *this;
         }

    };
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Your code looks like a better start, but you are missing a destructor. Check out RAII and the big three/rule of three. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_Acquisition_Is_Initialization, parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/coding-standards.html#faq-27.10 –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 20 '10 at 18:58
    
For one, your code is not compiling. In your constructor Set(), you are using index = -1; where index is not declared anywhere. Secondly, in your operator overloading method operation+(Set s), you are using temp(s.elements[i]) where temp is not a function; it's an object! What are you trying to do? –  Jaywalker Oct 28 '10 at 11:12

I would avoid a char pointer completely and use std::string instead. This way you dont even need a copy constructor and an assigment operator because the compiler generated once will do just fine. (because 'elements' of the 'Set' class is copy-constructible and has an assignment operator) Here is my solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class Set{
  std::string elements;

  public:
         Set() {
             elements = "";
         }

         explicit Set(char* _elements) {
             if (_elements)
                elements = _elements;
         }

         Set operator+(const Set& s){
             Set temp(*this);    

             temp.elements += s.elements;
             return temp;
         }



};

Btw. I added a constructor from char* so that 'elements' can somehow be initialized from outside. Not sure if this is what you wanted.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, but that doesn't teach 'memory allocation' responsibility to the OP –  Jaywalker Oct 28 '10 at 11:34

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