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Similar to a question posted here, am looking for a solution in Java.

That is, how to find the index of nth occurrence of a character/string from a string?

Example: "/folder1/folder2/folder3/". In this case, if I ask for 3rd occurrence of slash (/), it appears before folder3, and I expect to return this index position. My actual intention is to substring it from nth occurrence of a character.

Is there any convenient/ready-to-use method available in Java API or do we need to write a small logic on our own to solve this?

Also,

  1. I quickly searched whether any method is supported for this purpose at Apache Commons Lang's StringUtils, but I don't find any.
  2. Can regular expressions help in this regard?
share|improve this question
1  
For your particular example, depending on what you want to do with the result, it might be easier to split the string on /, which might well give you what you need directly? – The Archetypal Paul Oct 20 '10 at 10:09
    
@Paul: That's a good idea too. – Gnanam Oct 20 '10 at 11:33
    
Please accept the answer which suited your requirement – Satheesh Nov 12 '14 at 9:45

15 Answers 15

If you already depend on Apache Commons you can use StringUtils.ordinalIndexOf, otherwise, here's an implementation:

public static int ordinalIndexOf(String str, char c, int n) {
    int pos = str.indexOf(c, 0);
    while (n-- > 0 && pos != -1)
        pos = str.indexOf(c, pos+1);
    return pos;
}

Note that the first occurrence is found by n = 0. Second occurrence by n = 1 and so on.

share|improve this answer
1  
I suspect you want to return pos-1 here, otherwise you'll find the index past the nth occurrence. It's fine for then take the substring from that position, but it's probably not a good return value for a general purpose method. – Jon Skeet Oct 20 '10 at 10:04
    
Ah, good point. Thanks. – aioobe Oct 20 '10 at 10:05
    
@aioobe: +1 - although having to work out that sort of off-by-one error is precisely why my approach doesn't use indexOf :) – Jon Skeet Oct 20 '10 at 10:18
2  
Shouldn't the 2nd occurrence give the index of /folder2/folder3/? That would be the 2nd slash? I would change n-- to --n. – Ishtar Oct 20 '10 at 11:12
    
I thought the most convenient thing would be to start counting from 0... depends on your needs of course. – aioobe Oct 20 '10 at 11:22

I believe the easiest solution for finding the Nth occurrence of a String is to use StringUtils.ordinalIndexOf() from Apache Commons.

Example:

StringUtils.ordinalIndexOf("aabaabaa", "b", 2)  == 5
share|improve this answer

Two simple options occur:

  • Use charAt() repeatedly
  • Use indexOf() repeatedly

For example:

public static int nthIndexOf(String text, char needle, int n)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < text.length(); i++)
    {
        if (text.charAt(i) == needle)
        {
            n--;
            if (n == 0)
            {
                return i;
            }
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

That may well not perform as well as using indexOf repeatedly, but it's possibly simpler to get right.

share|improve this answer

You can try something like this:

import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
      System.out.println(from3rd("/folder1/folder2/folder3/"));
    }

    private static Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(/[^/]*){2}/([^/]*)");

    public static String from3rd(String in) {
        Matcher m = p.matcher(in);

        if (m.matches())
            return m.group(2);
        else
            return null;
    }
}

Note that I did some assumptions in the regex:

  • the input path is absolute (i.e. starts with "/");
  • you do not need the 3rd "/" in the result.

As requested in a comment, I'll try to explain the regex: (/[^/]*){2}/([^/]*)

Regular expression visualization

  • /[^/]* is a / followed by [^/]* (any number of characters that are not a /),
  • (/[^/]*) groups the previous expression in a single entity. This is the 1st group of the expression,
  • (/[^/]*){2} means that the group must match extactly {2} times,
  • [^/]* is again any number of characters that are not a /,
  • ([^/]*) groups the previos expression in a single entity. This is the 2nd group of the expression.

This way you have only to get the substring that matches the 2nd group: return m.group(2);

Image courtesy by Debuggex

share|improve this answer
    
could you explain the regex in plain english? Like : A backslash followed by anything that is not a backslach an indefinite number of time... Then I'm not sure. – Ced Sep 15 '15 at 20:33
1  
@Ced, I added an explanation and a small fix to regex. I hope it is clearer now. – andcoz Sep 17 '15 at 11:39
    
That was very clear, thanks. – Ced Sep 17 '15 at 12:17

I made a few changes to aioobe's answer and got a nth lastIndexOf version, and fix some NPE problems. See code below:

public int nthLastIndexOf(String str, char c, int n) {
        if (str == null || n < 1)
            return -1;
        int pos = str.length();
        while (n-- > 0 && pos != -1)
            pos = str.lastIndexOf(c, pos - 1);
        return pos;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think it's reasonable that the method throws an NPE if given null as argument. This is the most common behavior in the standard library. – aioobe Dec 10 '15 at 22:54
 ([.^/]*/){2}[^/]*(/)

Match anything followed by / two times, then again. The third one is the one you want

The Matcher state can be used to tell where the last / is

share|improve this answer
    
I am sure this is a very cool answer,but how do I use this in my code? – akshayrajkore Aug 5 '15 at 18:30
    
Look at @andcoz's answer (different regexp, but the idea is the same) – The Archetypal Paul Aug 5 '15 at 18:34

Nowadays there IS support of Apache Commons Lang's StringUtils,

This is the primitive:

int org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils.ordinalIndexOf(CharSequence str, CharSequence searchStr, int ordinal)

for your problem you can code the following: StringUtils.ordinalIndexOf(uri, "/", 3)

You can also find the last nth occurrence of a character in a string with the lastOrdinalIndexOf method.

share|improve this answer
public static int nth(String source, String pattern, int n) {

   int i = 0, pos = 0, tpos = 0;

   while (i < n) {

      pos = source.indexOf(pattern);
      if (pos > -1) {
         source = source.substring(pos+1);
         tpos += pos+1;
         i++;
      } else {
         return -1;
      }
   }

   return tpos - 1;
}
share|improve this answer

Another approach:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String str = "/folder1/folder2/folder3/"; 
    int index = nthOccurrence(str, '/', 3);
    System.out.println(index);
}

public static int nthOccurrence(String s, char c, int occurrence) {
    return nthOccurrence(s, 0, c, 0, occurrence);
}

public static int nthOccurrence(String s, int from, char c, int curr, int expected) {
    final int index = s.indexOf(c, from);
    if(index == -1) return -1;
    return (curr + 1 == expected) ? index : 
        nthOccurrence(s, index + 1, c, curr + 1, expected);
}
share|improve this answer

This answer improves on @aioobe 's answer. Two bugs in that answer were fixed.
1. n=0 should return -1.
2. nth occurence returned -1, but it worked on n-1th occurences.

Try this !

    public int nthOccurrence(String str, char c, int n) {
    if(n <= 0){
        return -1;
    }
    int pos = str.indexOf(c, 0);
    while (n-- > 1 && pos != -1)
        pos = str.indexOf(c, pos+1);
    return pos;
}
share|improve this answer
/* program to find nth occurence of a character */

import java.util.Scanner;

public class CharOccur1
{

    public static void main(String arg[])
    {
        Scanner scr=new Scanner(System.in);
        int position=-1,count=0;
        System.out.println("enter the string");
        String str=scr.nextLine();
        System.out.println("enter the nth occurence of the character");
        int n=Integer.parseInt(scr.next());
        int leng=str.length();
        char c[]=new char[leng];
        System.out.println("Enter the character to find");
        char key=scr.next().charAt(0);
        c=str.toCharArray();
        for(int i=0;i<c.length;i++)
        {
            if(c[i]==key)
            {
                count++;
                position=i;
                if(count==n)
                {
                    System.out.println("Character found");
                    System.out.println("the position at which the " + count + " ocurrence occurs is " + position);
                    return;
                }
            }
        }
        if(n>count)
        { 
            System.out.println("Character occurs  "+ count + " times");
            return;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
public class Sam_Stringnth {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String str="abcabcabc";
        int n = nthsearch(str, 'c', 3);
        if(n<=0)
            System.out.println("Character not found");
        else
            System.out.println("Position is:"+n);
    }
    public static int nthsearch(String str, char ch, int n){
        int pos=0;
        if(n!=0){
            for(int i=1; i<=n;i++){
                pos = str.indexOf(ch, pos)+1;
            }
            return pos;
        }
        else{
            return 0;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

My solution:

/**
 * Like String.indexOf, but find the n:th occurance of c
 * @param s string to search
 * @param c character to search for
 * @param n n:th character to seach for, starting with 1
 * @return the position (0-based) of the found char, or -1 if failed
 */

public static int nthIndexOf(String s, char c, int n) {
    int i = -1;
    while (n-- > 0) {
        i = s.indexOf(c, i + 1);
        if (i == -1)
            break;
    }
    return i;
}
share|improve this answer

The code returns the nth occurrence positions substring aka field width. Example. if string "Stack overflow in low melow" is the string to search 2nd occurance of token "low", you will agree with me that it 2nd occurance is at subtring "18 and 21". indexOfOccurance("Stack overflow in low melow", low, 2) returns 18 and 21 in a string.

class Example{
    public Example(){
    }
            public String indexOfOccurance(String string, String token, int nthOccurance) {
                    int lengthOfToken = token.length();
                    int nthCount = 0;
                    for (int shift = 0,count = 0; count < string.length() - token.length() + 2; count++, shift++, lengthOfToken++)
                        if (string.substring(shift, lengthOfToken).equalsIgnoreCase(token)) { 
                    // keeps count of nthOccurance
                            nthCount++; 
                        if (nthCount == nthOccurance){
                    //checks if nthCount  == nthOccurance. If true, then breaks 
                             return String.valueOf(shift)+ " " +String.valueOf(lengthOfToken);   
                        }  
                    }
                    return "-1";
                }
    public static void main(String args[]){
    Example example = new Example();
    String string = "the man, the woman and the child";
    int nthPositionOfThe = 3;
   System.out.println("3rd Occurance of the is at " + example.indexOfOccurance(string, "the", nthPositionOfThe));
    }
    }
share|improve this answer

//in pure c++

int pos = 0;
for ( int i = 0; i < N; ++i ) // N = nth position
{
  pos = STRING.find( delim, pos + size_of_delim );
}
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