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How to know if .keyup() is a character key (jQuery)

$("input").keyup(function() {

if (key is a character) { //such as a b A b c 5 3 2 $ # ^ ! ^ * # ...etc not enter key or shift or Esc or space ...etc
/* Do stuff */
}

});
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5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Note: In hindsight this was a quick and dirty answer, and may not work in all situations. To have a reliable solution, see Tim Down's answer (copy pasting that here as this answer is still getting views and gasp upvotes):

You can't do this reliably with the keyup event. If you want to know something about the character that was typed, you have to use the keypress event instead.

The following example will work all the time in most browsers but there are some edge cases that you should be aware of. For what is in my view the definitive guide on this, see http://unixpapa.com/js/key.html.

$("input").keypress(function(e) {
    if (e.which !== 0) {
        alert("Charcter was typed. It was: " + String.fromCharCode(e.which));
    }
});

keyup and keydown give you information about the physical key that was pressed. On standard US/UK keyboards in their standard layouts, it looks like there is a correlation between the keyCode property of these events and the character they represent. However, this is not reliable: different keyboard layouts will have different mappings.


The following was the original answer, but is not correct and may not work reliably in all situations.

To match the keycode with a word character (eg., a would match. space would not)

$("input").keyup(function(event)
{ 
    var c= String.fromCharCode(event.keyCode);
    var isWordcharacter = c.match(/\w/);
}); 

Ok, that was a quick answer. The approach is the same, but beware of keycode issues, see this article in quirksmode.

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1  
On Firefox keyCode for F1 key and P keys is the same (also F2 is 'q', F3 is 'r' etc.). On Chromium (Webkit browser) F1 is 'P', F2 is 'Q' etc. –  hluk Oct 20 '10 at 12:47
5  
You can't get the character typed reliably from the keyup event. This may work on your keyboard but for different keyboard types and different cultures there are no guarantees at all. –  Tim Down Oct 20 '10 at 13:13
3  
If @TimDown's point wasn't clear enough, here's another one: this is basically the wrong answer. –  Christian Jun 21 '12 at 13:10
    
@Christian agreed. I had answered this almost 2 years ago. Now when I look at it I know this is wrong. I don't even remember what I was thinking when I wrote this. I am unable to delete this as this is the accepted answer (but would be glad to if a Mod can help) –  Nivas Jun 22 '12 at 15:40
    
I wouldn't delete it, it's still an answer. But sadly it seems mods aren't much proactive about the issue. –  Christian Jun 22 '12 at 18:44

You can't do this reliably with the keyup event. If you want to know something about the character that was typed, you have to use the keypress event instead.

The following example will work all the time in most browsers but there are some edge cases that you should be aware of. For what is in my view the definitive guide on this, see http://unixpapa.com/js/key.html.

$("input").keypress(function(e) {
    if (e.which !== 0) {
        alert("Charcter was typed. It was: " + String.fromCharCode(e.which));
    }
});

keyup and keydown give you information about the physical key that was pressed. On standard US/UK keyboards in their standard layouts, it looks like there is a correlation between the keyCode property of these events and the character they represent. However, this is not reliable: different keyboard layouts will have different mappings.

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I just encountered a similar problem, where I was not able to detect and disable the ENTER key with keyup, but I was able to do this with keypress. –  Ian Campbell Jan 10 at 6:00

This helped for me:

$("#input").keyup(function(event) {
        //use keyup instead keypress because:
        //- keypress will not work on backspace and delete
        //- keypress is called before the character is added to the textfield (at least in google chrome) 
        var searchText = $.trim($("#input").val());

        var c= String.fromCharCode(event.keyCode);
        var isWordCharacter = c.match(/\w/);
        var isBackspaceOrDelete = (event.keyCode == 8 || event.keyCode == 46);

        // trigger only on word characters, backspace or delete and an entry size of at least 3 characters
        if((isWordCharacter || isBackspaceOrDelete) && searchText.length > 2)
        { ...
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I wanted to do exactly this, and I thought of a solution involving both the keyup and the keypress events.

(I haven't tested it in all browsers, but I used the information compiled at http://unixpapa.com/js/key.html)

Edit: rewrote it as a jQuery plugin.

(function($) {
    $.fn.normalkeypress = function(onNormal, onSpecial) {
        this.bind('keydown keypress keyup', (function() {
            var keyDown = {}, // keep track of which buttons have been pressed
                lastKeyDown;
            return function(event) {
                if (event.type == 'keydown') {
                    keyDown[lastKeyDown = event.keyCode] = false;
                    return;
                }
                if (event.type == 'keypress') {
                    keyDown[lastKeyDown] = event; // this keydown also triggered a keypress
                    return;
                }

                // 'keyup' event
                var keyPress = keyDown[event.keyCode];
                if ( keyPress &&
                     ( ( ( keyPress.which >= 32 // not a control character
                           //|| keyPress.which == 8  || // \b
                           //|| keyPress.which == 9  || // \t
                           //|| keyPress.which == 10 || // \n
                           //|| keyPress.which == 13    // \r
                           ) &&
                         !( keyPress.which >= 63232 && keyPress.which <= 63247 ) && // not special character in WebKit < 525
                         !( keyPress.which == 63273 )                            && //
                         !( keyPress.which >= 63275 && keyPress.which <= 63277 ) && //
                         !( keyPress.which === event.keyCode && // not End / Home / Insert / Delete (i.e. in Opera < 10.50)
                            ( keyPress.which == 35  || // End
                              keyPress.which == 36  || // Home
                              keyPress.which == 45  || // Insert
                              keyPress.which == 46  || // Delete
                              keyPress.which == 144    // Num Lock
                              )
                            )
                         ) ||
                       keyPress.which === undefined // normal character in IE < 9.0
                       ) &&
                     keyPress.charCode !== 0 // not special character in Konqueror 4.3
                     ) {

                    // Normal character
                    if (onNormal) onNormal.call(this, keyPress, event);
                } else {
                    // Special character
                    if (onSpecial) onSpecial.call(this, event);
                }
                delete keyDown[event.keyCode];
            };
        })());
    };
})(jQuery);
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If you only need to exclude out enter, escape and spacebar keys, you can do the following:

$("#text1").keyup(function(event) {
if (event.keyCode != '13' && event.keyCode != '27' && event.keyCode != '32') {
     alert('test');
   }
});

See it actions here.

You can refer to the complete list of keycode here for your further modification.

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1  
not enter key or shift or Esc or space ...((((((etc)))))) –  faressoft Oct 20 '10 at 12:33

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