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I just looked up the Set interface and found that it mostly (or completely) only redeclares functions which are already in the Collection interface. Set itself extends Collection, so doesn't that mean that the Set interface automatically has all the functions from Collection? So why are they redeclared then?

For example, Set redeclares this:

/**
 * Returns the number of elements in this set (its cardinality).  If this
 * set contains more than <tt>Integer.MAX_VALUE</tt> elements, returns
 * <tt>Integer.MAX_VALUE</tt>.
 *
 * @return the number of elements in this set (its cardinality)
 */
int size();

/**
 * Returns <tt>true</tt> if this set contains no elements.
 *
 * @return <tt>true</tt> if this set contains no elements
 */
boolean isEmpty();

And the declaration in Collection:

/**
 * Returns the number of elements in this collection.  If this collection
 * contains more than <tt>Integer.MAX_VALUE</tt> elements, returns
 * <tt>Integer.MAX_VALUE</tt>.
 *
 * @return the number of elements in this collection
 */
int size();

/**
 * Returns <tt>true</tt> if this collection contains no elements.
 *
 * @return <tt>true</tt> if this collection contains no elements
 */
boolean isEmpty();

This seems very redundant to me. Why not just define the Set interface as:

public interface Set<E> extends Collection<E> {}

I think there is no single difference between those interfaces, right?


Of course I am not asking about the different semantics / meaning of Set. I know that. I am just asking about if it technically (i.e. to the compiler) has any difference. I.e., speaking generally:

interface A { void foo(); }
interface B extends A { void foo(); }
interface C extends A {}

Now, is there any difference between A, B or C?


While the contract (i.e. what is said in the documentation) can really be different for some functions (as for add), there is a valid reason to redeclare them: To be able to put a new documentation, i.e. to define the new contract.

However, there are also functions (like isEmpty) which have exactly the same documentation / contract. Why are they also redeclared?

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1  
I'll go on a hunger-strike until this have been dealt with! –  willcodejavaforfood Oct 20 '10 at 13:53
    
you have to understand the interface is no silver bullet. in interface you can not understand sequence, nor invariant that been held by any class in java. this problem is an open problem that java developers decided to solve by stating the answer in the manual. if you have a better solution, of representing in language syntex the sequnce and invariants , here is a place to state it. –  none Oct 20 '10 at 14:44
    
@none: Well, this is not exactly what I was heading at with my question but this is indeed another very interesting question. I have seen some proposals where it was possible to write complex logical pre- and post-conditions for functions. I don't exactly remember anymore what it was called though. –  Albert Oct 20 '10 at 19:24
    
the problem with @pre and @post is that they don't let you know the sequence of instructions. lets take a simple look at iterator pattern, they had to make a special sytax to make it clear for all, and make sure the hasNext() and Next() interface is called properly. so is the solution is by giving a manual and creating new language syntax for every problem? is lisp the answer(you write code that writes code that...) i do hope not. –  none Oct 21 '10 at 8:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Technically for the compiler it makes no difference at all.

However, a set cannot have duplicate entries whereas a Collection can. This is worth knowing about.

Because of this, the methods semantics for parameters, return values and what happens can mean different things. Redeclaring also allows the javadoc to become more specific. For example for add():

Set: @return true if this set did not already contain the specified element

Collection: @return true if this collection changed as a result of the call

The meaning for set is more specific.

Even for methods that are not more specific, it enables the javadoc to be nicer. For example, for size() : "Returns the number of elements in this set (its cardinality)." which is closer to the language people used to mathematical sets will understand.

The API documents summarise this by saying: "The Set interface places additional stipulations, beyond those inherited from the Collection interface, on the contracts of all constructors and on the contracts of the add, equals and hashCode methods. Declarations for other inherited methods are also included here for convenience. (The specifications accompanying these declarations have been tailored to the Set interface, but they do not contain any additional stipulations.)"

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I don't think this was the question. The question was why identical methods are redeclared (like size and isEmpty). –  musiKk Oct 20 '10 at 14:01
    
@musiKk - thanks, I thought I'd mentioned that but I've tried to be more specific now –  Nick Fortescue Oct 20 '10 at 14:16
1  
Ah, so, the main reasons (for most functions) and the basic answer to my question is: "it enables the javadoc to be nicer" :) That is what I have assumed but I asked here on SO just to be sure about that. –  Albert Oct 20 '10 at 14:31
    
@Albert: It's not just enabling the Javadoc to be nicer... the difference in semantics makes a functional difference, and having a separate interface representing Set enables you to restrict a given method to working only with collections that obey the Set semantics in a type-safe way by simply declaring Set rather than Collection as a parameter type. –  ColinD Oct 20 '10 at 22:24
    
@ColinD: I know the different meaning. But still there is no difference to the compiler. I.e. just the Javadoc is different. –  Albert Oct 20 '10 at 22:30

The answer is in the java6 API for set.

"The Set interface places additional stipulations, beyond those inherited from the Collection interface, on the contracts of all constructors and on the contracts of the add, equals and hashCode methods. Declarations for other inherited methods are also included here for convenience. (The specifications accompanying these declarations have been tailored to the Set interface, but they do not contain any additional stipulations.)"

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Ah, somehow over read this. But just to clarify: Technically, it doesn't make any difference? It is just that IDEs show the somewhat different documentation of some of the functions to the developer? –  Albert Oct 20 '10 at 14:04
    
@Albert what doesn't make any difference? There is every difference in the world because Set semantics are different that Collection semantics is different than List semantics and so on.. –  hvgotcodes Oct 20 '10 at 14:10
    
@hvgotcodes: Technical difference = existing working code would break if you use my Set definition –  Albert Oct 20 '10 at 14:13
    
@albert, sorry I am not following you. The interface is not being reproduced verbatim, it is being redefined; i.e. expanded upon to take into account how sets are different. –  hvgotcodes Oct 20 '10 at 14:17
    
My question was: If you would replace the definition of Set by my given suggestion, would existing working code break? –  Albert Oct 20 '10 at 14:21

There is more to a method than its signature.

In this case, the documentation of these methods has been tailored to sets, in terms of pre- and post-conditions, and terminology.

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1  
+1 for "There is more to a method than its signature." –  Andrzej Doyle Oct 20 '10 at 17:00

They are redeclared because, even if the names are same, they have different meaning. The add method in the Set is a specific implementation of the generic add method in Collection.

The intention is to explicitly specify that the add method os the Set is very different from the add method of Collection.

Why not just define the Set interface as:

public interface Set<E> extends Collection<E> {} 

If it has been done this way, there would be no place where the contract of a Set can be specified. How would I know that by implementing the add method of the Set, I should not allow duplicates?

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But the contract is just documentation, right? So technically, it wouldn't make any difference? It is just that other developers know about the different meaning? –  Albert Oct 20 '10 at 14:06
    
Technically, seen as pure code, there is no difference at all. It is just that other developers know about the different meaning ?: Yes. And this is very important. –  Nivas Oct 20 '10 at 14:08
1  
Ok, thanks for that clarification. Still leaves the question open: What about really identical functions such as isEmpty or size? Why are those redeclared? –  Albert Oct 20 '10 at 14:11

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