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The following code

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $s1 = 'aaa2000@yahoo.com';
my $s2 = 'aaa_2000@yahoo.com';
my $s3 = 'aaa2000';
my $s4 = 'aaa_2000';

no locale;

print "\nNO Locale:\n\n";

if ($s1 gt $s2) {print "$s1 is > $s2\n";}
if ($s1 lt $s2) {print "$s1 is < $s2\n";}
if ($s1 eq $s2) {print "$s1 is = $s2\n";}

if ($s3 gt $s4) {print "$s3 is > $s4\n";}
if ($s3 lt $s4) {print "$s3 is < $s4\n";}
if ($s3 eq $s4) {print "$s3 is = $s4\n";}

use locale;

print "\nWith 'use locale;':\n\n";

if ($s1 gt $s2) {print "$s1 is > $s2\n";}
if ($s1 lt $s2) {print "$s1 is < $s2\n";}
if ($s1 eq $s2) {print "$s1 is = $s2\n";}

if ($s3 gt $s4) {print "$s3 is > $s4\n";}
if ($s3 lt $s4) {print "$s3 is < $s4\n";}
if ($s3 eq $s4) {print "$s3 is = $s4\n";}

prints out

NO Locale:

aaa2000@yahoo.com is < aaa_2000@yahoo.com
aaa2000 is < aaa_2000

With 'use locale;':

aaa2000@yahoo.com is > aaa_2000@yahoo.com
aaa2000 is < aaa_2000

which I cannot really follow: in the same time, under use locale, there is a < b AND a@yahoo.com > b@yahoo.com ?!!

Am I missing something more or less obvious, or is this a bug? Can others confirm to see the same behavior ?

Locale is $ locale
LANG=en_US.UTF-8
LC_CTYPE="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_NUMERIC="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_TIME="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_COLLATE="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_MONETARY="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_MESSAGES="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_PAPER="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_NAME="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_ADDRESS="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_TELEPHONE="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_MEASUREMENT="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_IDENTIFICATION="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_ALL=

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

With locales enabled, collation is done in multiple passes. Every character has four weights, which are compared in successive passes. The @ and _ signs, like most punctuation, have no primary, secondary, or tertiary weight, so they only come into play in the fourth pass. So, for your example

aaa2000@yahoo.com > aaa_2000@yahoo.com

in the first pass, it's really comparing

aaa2000yahoocom = aaa2000yahoocom

and then in the fourth pass (there are no differentiating factors in the second and third passes)

@. > _@.

because @ happens to be greater than _ in this locale. (This is just a choice that the locale definition makes, presumably based on some ISO standard or other.)

You can peek into the implementation details of this. A locale-enabled comparison ends up being implemented in the C library as strxfrm(A) cmp strxfrm(B). Run this program:

use POSIX;

my $s1 = 'aaa2000@yahoo.com';
my $s2 = 'aaa_2000@yahoo.com';

foreach ($s1, $s2) {
    printf "%s =>\t%v02x\n", $_, POSIX::strxfrm($_);
}

I get:

aaa2000@yahoo.com =>    0c.0c.0c.04.02.02.02.24.0c.13.1a.1a.0e.1a.18.01.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.01.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.01.08.5d.06.44
# explanation:           a  a  a  2  0  0  0  y  a  h  o  o  c  o  m DIV secondary weights ...                       DIV tertiary weights ...                        DIV  @     .
aaa_2000@yahoo.com =>   0c.0c.0c.04.02.02.02.24.0c.13.1a.1a.0e.1a.18.01.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.08.01.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.02.01.04.36.05.5d.06.44
# explanation:           a  a  a  2  0  0  0  y  a  h  o  o  c  o  m DIV secondary weights ...                       DIV tertiary weights ...                        DIV  _     @     .

The way these numbers are derived is an implementation detail; they just have to come out such that a byte comparison yields the desired end result. But the concept is the same across all modern programming environments with locale-enabled sorting.

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You’re just describing the Unicode Collation Algorithm. It isn’t really a locale thing. But I would trust the UCA with or without locale mods a million times more than I would ever trust vendor locales. Those just always fail for me. I very strongly consider/opine locales to be deprecated legacy bandaides for ctype/collate purposes now that we have Unicode. –  tchrist Aug 27 '11 at 15:11
    
No, I'm describing the reality of his system as it applies to his problem. I suspect most vendors nowadays implement their locales based on the UCA; after all the UCA wasn't invented out of thin air. But I don't see your point about why locales fail or should be considered legacy. Certainly you need language-specific sorting rules as long as there are languages that deviate from the "default" ordering. But that's really besides the point of this question. –  Peter Eisentraut Aug 28 '11 at 9:03
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I get the same results on my 32-bit Linux system with the en_US.utf8 locale. It's not a Perl bug, as illustrated by this C program:

#include <locale.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void transformed(const char* str)
{
  char dest[256];
  const char* c;

  strxfrm(dest, str, sizeof(dest));
  printf("%18s =", str);
  for (c = dest; *c; ++c) printf(" %02x", *c);
  puts("");
} /* end transformed */

void test_strings(const char* s1, const char* s2)
{
  int c = strcoll(s1, s2);

  printf("%s is %s %s\n", s1, ((c < 0) ? "<" : ((c == 0) ? "=" : ">")), s2);
} /* end test_strings */

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  puts("with C locale:");

  test_strings("aaa2000@yahoo.com", "aaa_2000@yahoo.com");
  test_strings("aaa2000", "aaa_2000");

  setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
  puts("\nwith your locale:");

  test_strings("aaa2000@yahoo.com", "aaa_2000@yahoo.com");
  test_strings("aaa2000", "aaa_2000");
  puts("");
  transformed("aaa2000@yahoo.com");
  transformed("aaa_2000@yahoo.com");
  transformed("aaa2000");
  transformed("aaa_2000");
  return 0;
} /* end main */

With LANG=en_US.utf8, it generates:

with C locale:
aaa2000@yahoo.com is < aaa_2000@yahoo.com
aaa2000 is < aaa_2000

with your locale:
aaa2000@yahoo.com is > aaa_2000@yahoo.com
aaa2000 is < aaa_2000

 aaa2000@yahoo.com = 0c 0c 0c 04 02 02 02 24 0c 13 1a 1a 0e 1a 18 01 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 01 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 01 08 5d 06 44
aaa_2000@yahoo.com = 0c 0c 0c 04 02 02 02 24 0c 13 1a 1a 0e 1a 18 01 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 01 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 01 04 36 05 5d 06 44
           aaa2000 = 0c 0c 0c 04 02 02 02 01 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 01 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
          aaa_2000 = 0c 0c 0c 04 02 02 02 01 08 08 08 08 08 08 08 01 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 01 04 36

The strxfrm function (which you can access in Perl through the POSIX module) returns a string which indicates the collation order. When you compare two such transformed strings byte-for-byte, the first one to have a smaller byte comes first in the collation order.

I'm not sure if this is a bug or not. I can't seem to find any documentation on how the en_US collation order is supposed to work. If it is a bug, it's in your C library or locale database.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds like a bug, possibly an intentional one knowing the glibc developers... –  R.. Oct 21 '10 at 5:53
    
I'm suspecting that the above mentioned issue is related to the following one: in a simple file containing 2 records with 2 TAB separated fields, like 'a_2 2/a2 1' a command like 'sort -k 1 file | cut -f 1' will display an inverse order than the one shown with the same sort but on a file not having the second field. –  Krambambuli Oct 21 '10 at 10:21
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