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Example:

IF OBJECT_ID('T1') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE T1;
GO

CREATE TABLE T1 (id int PRIMARY KEY, timestamp);
GO

INSERT INTO T1(id) VALUES (1);
GO

declare @v timestamp;
INSERT INTO T1(id) OUTPUT inserted.timestamp as v VALUES (10);
select @v

How can I get the inserted.timestamp into variable @v?

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If you post code or XML, please highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code" button (101 010) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! – marc_s Oct 20 '10 at 17:24

This is what I got to work:

IF OBJECT_ID('T1') IS NOT NULL 
DROP TABLE T1; 
GO 

CREATE TABLE T1 (id int PRIMARY KEY, timestamp); 
GO 

INSERT INTO T1(id) VALUES (1); 
GO 

declare @v as table ([timestamp] varbinary) --timestamp; 
INSERT INTO T1(id) 
OUTPUT inserted.[timestamp] into @v 
VALUES (10); 

select * from @v 

One thing you need to realize is a timestamp field cannot be manually populated. So you must use some other type in your output table. ANd BTW timestamp is deprecated, I would not use it in new development at all. Use rowversion instead. And timestamp doesn't mean it will be a date for those who think it should be like the ANSII Standard, IN SQL Server it is not a date or convertable to a date.

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1  
Key point: a TIMESTAMP field in SQL has nothing to do with DATETIME/DATETIME2. This gave me grief for a number of hours until I realized "that's just how it is" in SQL Server :-) – user166390 Jan 4 '11 at 20:48
    
In SQL2008R2 I was only able to use rowversion as a keyword in the DDL for a table. However, the type of the resulting column was TIMESTAMP (So, use rowversion in the DDL, yes, but good luck finding a rowversion type! Perhaps it can vary? I don't know.) – user166390 Jan 4 '11 at 20:49
    
timestamp = varbinary(8) – garik Mar 31 '11 at 14:35

One way would be to use identity:

declare @v timestamp; 
declare @ID int; 
INSERT INTO T1(id) OUTPUT inserted.timestamp as v VALUES (10); 
select @ID =@@IDENTITY;
select @v=timestamp from T1 where id=@ID;

(edit)... of course that would require an identity column. Since you know the value of the ID you are inserting then you don't even need to do this, just select the same row after you insert it using your original value.

Is the point you would like to do this all in a single statement? You could probably do it with a trigger but seems unnecessary.

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Thanks. However, I want to reduce an extra select from the table to reduce the overhead. The result is already available as "v" in the INSERT INTO statement, and I only need to get it out so I can return it (for example if this is implemented in a stored-procedure) – Jacky Chen Oct 20 '10 at 16:08
    
How about creating the timestamp yourself instead of using a timestamp column? e.g. select @ts=GETDATE(); insert into t1(id,timestamp) values (10,@ts); SELECT @ts; – Jamie Treworgy Oct 20 '10 at 16:18
1  
@jamietre: if ever, then using SCOPE_IDENTITY() instead of @@identity.... Plus - the OP is not using IDENTITY in his table - rather, he's actually defining the value to be stored... just used that value to retrieve the timestamp – marc_s Oct 20 '10 at 17:25
1  
@marc_s. I realized that, hence my edit. You are correct about scope_identity(). Old habits die hard. – Jamie Treworgy Oct 20 '10 at 17:31
    
@jamietre - in SQL Server a timestamp column has nothing to do with dates. – HLGEM Oct 20 '10 at 19:53

Well, you're inserting a specific value into the ID column, which is the primary key - so just read out the row once you've inserted it...

INSERT INTO T1(id) VALUES (1);
GO

DECLARE @v timestamp

SELECT @v = TIMESTAMP 
FROM dbo.T1 
WHERE ID = 1

SELECT @v
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