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I have a weird list built in the following way:

[[name_d, 5], [name_e, 10], [name_a, 5]] 

and I want to sort it first by the number (desc) and then, if the number is the same, by the name (asc). So the result I would like to have is:

[[name_e, 10], [name_a, 5], [name_d, 5]]

I tried to think to a lambda function that I can use in the sort method, but I'm not sure I can do it.

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1  
possible duplicate of Advanced sorting criteria for a list of nested tuples –  SilentGhost Oct 20 '10 at 16:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This should do it:

l=[[name_d, 5], [name_e, 10], [name_a, 5]]
sorted(l,key=lambda x: (x[1]*-1,x[0]))

Edit: Sort order

share|improve this answer
    
he needs descending sorting for the number –  SilentGhost Oct 20 '10 at 16:07
    
this doesn't work in the way I want, because it sorts also the name in desc (or asc) mode –  Giovanni Di Milia Oct 20 '10 at 16:09
1  
@Giovanni: it's not a black box. Do you see how it is solved? and you cannot modify it to suit your problem? –  SilentGhost Oct 20 '10 at 16:10
1  
yeah, -x[1] would do –  SilentGhost Oct 20 '10 at 16:10
1  
btw: if you don't want to copy the listL l.sort(key=lambda...) –  tback Oct 20 '10 at 16:15

    Here's something I whipped up (to solve the same type of problem). I've only checked it with my latest versions of installed Python (OS X). The import parts below are the (clunkily-named) sort keys: sortKeyWithTwoListOrders and sortKeyWith2ndThen1stListValue


#Tested under Python 2.7.1 & Python 3.2.3:

import random # Just to shuffle for demo purposes

# Our two lists to sort
firstCol=['abc','ghi','jkl','mno','bcd','hjk']
secondCol=[5,4,2,1]

# Build 2 dimensional list [[firstCol,secondCol]...]
myList = []
for firstInd in range(0, len(firstCol)):
  for secondInd in range(0, len(secondCol)):
    myList = myList + [[firstCol[firstInd],secondCol[secondInd]]]

random.shuffle(myList)

print ("myList (shuffled):")
for i in range(0,len(myList)):
  print (myList[i])

def sortKeyWithTwoListOrders(item):
  return secondCol.index(item[1]), firstCol.index(item[0])

myList.sort(key=sortKeyWithTwoListOrders)
print ("myList (sorted according to strict list order, second column then first column):")
for i in range(0,len(myList)):
  print (myList[i])

random.shuffle(myList)

print ("myList (shuffled again):")
for i in range(0,len(myList)):
  print (myList[i])

def sortKeyWith2ndThen1stListValue(item):
  return item[1], item[0]

myList.sort(key=sortKeyWith2ndThen1stListValue)
print ("myList (sorted according to *values*, second column then first column):")
for i in range(0,len(myList)):
  print (myList[i])

myList (shuffled):
['ghi', 5]
['abc', 2]
['abc', 1]
['abc', 4]
['hjk', 5]
['bcd', 4]
['jkl', 5]
['jkl', 2]
['bcd', 1]
['ghi', 1]
['mno', 5]
['ghi', 2]
['hjk', 2]
['jkl', 4]
['mno', 4]
['bcd', 2]
['bcd', 5]
['ghi', 4]
['hjk', 4]
['mno', 2]
['abc', 5]
['mno', 1]
['hjk', 1]
['jkl', 1]
myList (sorted according to strict list order, second column then first column):
['abc', 5]
['ghi', 5]
['jkl', 5]
['mno', 5]
['bcd', 5]
['hjk', 5]
['abc', 4]
['ghi', 4]
['jkl', 4]
['mno', 4]
['bcd', 4]
['hjk', 4]
['abc', 2]
['ghi', 2]
['jkl', 2]
['mno', 2]
['bcd', 2]
['hjk', 2]
['abc', 1]
['ghi', 1]
['jkl', 1]
['mno', 1]
['bcd', 1]
['hjk', 1]
myList (shuffled again):
['hjk', 4]
['ghi', 1]
['abc', 5]
['bcd', 5]
['ghi', 4]
['mno', 1]
['jkl', 1]
['abc', 1]
['hjk', 1]
['jkl', 2]
['hjk', 5]
['mno', 2]
['jkl', 4]
['ghi', 5]
['bcd', 1]
['bcd', 2]
['jkl', 5]
['abc', 2]
['hjk', 2]
['abc', 4]
['mno', 4]
['mno', 5]
['bcd', 4]
['ghi', 2]
myList (sorted according to *values*, second column then first column):
['abc', 1]
['bcd', 1]
['ghi', 1]
['hjk', 1]
['jkl', 1]
['mno', 1]
['abc', 2]
['bcd', 2]
['ghi', 2]
['hjk', 2]
['jkl', 2]
['mno', 2]
['abc', 4]
['bcd', 4]
['ghi', 4]
['hjk', 4]
['jkl', 4]
['mno', 4]
['abc', 5]
['bcd', 5]
['ghi', 5]
['hjk', 5]
['jkl', 5]
['mno', 5]
share|improve this answer

It doesn't need to be a lambda function you pass into the sort method, you can actually provide a real function since they are first-class objects in python.

L.sort(my_comparison_function)

Should work just fine

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Comparison function goes away in Python 3, whereas the other answer is future proof. –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 20 '10 at 16:12
    
I thought about this, but how can I write a comparison function that works on two different keys? basically I need a f((x[0],x[1]), (y[0],y[1])) –  Giovanni Di Milia Oct 20 '10 at 16:14
    
@Steven: what are you talking about? this answer might be useless, but not for the reasons you state. Read the docs –  SilentGhost Oct 20 '10 at 16:14
    
@SilentGhost Maybe I'm misreading, but when I look at the linked docs i see that sort accepts a /key/ function in python 3, but not a /comparison/ function. –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 20 '10 at 17:24
    
@Steven: and what is key function if not a comparison function? –  SilentGhost Oct 20 '10 at 17:26

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