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I have a value thats 5 bits in length. 4 bits determine the number and the 5th bit determines the sign, there by holding any value between -16 and +15. How can I accomplish sign extending from a constant bit width in C#? I know in C, I can use something like the follow to accomplish this:

int x; // convert this from using 5 bits to a full int
int r; // resulting sign extended number goes here
struct {signed int x:5;} s;
r = s.x = x;

How can I do something similar to this in C#?

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Sorry I won't address your question, but I didn't know you could do that in C! Can you create arbitrary bit-length variables? Where can I find more information on that? –  uʍop ǝpısdn Oct 20 '10 at 18:45
    
haha Look at this site: graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html –  icemanind Oct 20 '10 at 18:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not really clear what you mean, but it could be as simple as:

int fiveBits = normal & 0x1f;

and for the reverse:

int normal =  fiveBits < 16 ? fiveBits : fiveBits | -32;

If you could suggest some original input and desired output, that would help.

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Hey Jon. Stated simply, I have a value, that is contained in an sbyte. This sbyte is 8 bits in length, by definition. I only care about the first 5 bits. The value I'm trying to extract from these 5 bits are actually a nibble (4 bits) in length, thus holding a value between 0-15. The 5 bite determines the sign (thus making my possible value range -16 thru +15). So, as an example, if my sbyte value is equal to 10 (01010 binary) then my result should be 10. If my sbyte value is equal to 26 (11010 binary) then my result should be -6 (because my 5th bit is 1 or signed). Does this make sense? –  icemanind Oct 20 '10 at 18:49
    
@icemanind: So I've given you an example using int - you should be able to just cast the results to sbyte in each case. –  Jon Skeet Oct 20 '10 at 18:51
    
Somewhat petty, but I would choose int normal = (fiveBits & 16) == 0 ? fiveBits : fiveBits | -32;. A less-than comparison does not actually ensure that bit 5 (the sign bit) is set. Using a bitwise AND operation specifically tests ONLY bit 5. If one were bouncing a lot of these values around you could create a FiveBits struct and implement implicit type conversion to and from Int32. Ex.: public static implicit operator int(FiveBits fiveBits) { return (fiveBits.Value & 16) == 0 ? fiveBits.Value : fiveBits.Value | -32; }. This would offer type-safety and prevent conversion errors. Fun! –  Kevin P. Rice Mar 29 '12 at 8:04

I know this is an old question, but for future searchers I have more info.

C# does not support custom bit widths, but it does support binary operations and getters/setters, which makes it relatively easy to add a compatibility layer. For instance, if you want to store the raw data in a byte _num, but want to be able to interact with it using a standard C# sbyte, you can use the following:

byte _num;
sbyte num {
    get
    {
        return (sbyte)(((_num & 0x10) << 3) | (_num & 0x0F));
    }
    set
    {
        _num = (byte)((value & 0x0F) | ((value & 0x80) >> 3));
    }
}

This kind of shell is especially useful when interacting with low level firmware or embedded projects.

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Perform a left shift followed by an arithmetic right shift to move the sign bit into the high position and then back. The arithmetic right shift will perform the sign extension for you.

Of course this depends on having a working arithmetic shift operation. The abstract C language does not (it's implementation-defined whether it works or not), but most implementations do. I'm not sure about C# but I would guess it has one.

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From your question, it appears you wish to have a structure that can readily be converted to and from an int type:

struct FiveBit
{
  public int bits;

  public static implicit operator int(FiveBit f)
  {
    return (f.bits & 0x10) == 0 ? f.bits : f.bits | -32;
  }

  public static implicit operator FiveBit(int r)
  {
    return new FiveBit() { bits = r & 0x1f };
  }
}

And here's an example of usage:

class FiveBitTest
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    FiveBit f = new FiveBit();
    int r; // resulting sign extended number goes here

    f.bits = 0;
    r = f;
    Console.WriteLine("r = {0}, f.bits = 0x{1:X}", r, f.bits);

    f.bits = 0x1f;
    r = f;
    Console.WriteLine("r = {0}, f.bits = 0x{1:X}", r, f.bits);

    r = -2;
    f = r;
    Console.WriteLine("r = {0}, f.bits = 0x{1:X}", r, f.bits);
}

The output of the above is:

r = 0, f.bits = 0x0
r = -1, f.bits = 0x1F
r = -2, f.bits = 0x1E
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I'm just writing a C function (because I don't really know C#) that will do this using operations that I know are available in C#.

int five_bit_to_signed(int five_bit) {
     int sh = sizeof(int*8)-5;
     int x = five_bit << sh; // puts your sign bit in the highest bit.
     return x >> sh;  // since x is signed this is an arithmatic signed shift
}
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Not sizeof(int)-5, but either sizeof(int)*8-5 or, by C# definition, straight 32-5. –  Eugene Ryabtsev Aug 16 '12 at 9:50
    
So true. Fixed. –  nategoose Oct 24 '12 at 16:02

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