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Why does my code not work?

package generatingInitialPopulation;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;

public class TestShuffle {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] arr = new int[10];

        for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
            arr[i] = i;
        }

        Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(arr));

        for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
            System.out.print(arr[i] + " ");
        }
    }
}

The result is: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9.

I was expecting a randomly shuffled sequence.

share|improve this question
up vote 32 down vote accepted

Arrays.asList() can't be applied to arrays of primitive type as you expect. When applied to int[], Arrays.asList() produces a list of int[]s instead of list of Integers. Therefore you shuffle a newly created list of int[].

This is a subtle behaviour of variadic arguments and generics in Java. Arrays.asList() is declared as

public static <T> List<T> asList(T... a)

So, it can take several arguments of some type T and produce a list containing these arguments, or it can take one argument of type T[] and return a list backed by this array (that's how variadic arguments work).

However, the latter option works only when T is a reference type (i.e. not a primitive type such as int), because only reference types may be used as type parameters in generics (and T is a type parameter).

So, if you pass int[], you get T = int[], and you code doesn't work as expected. But if you pass array of reference type (for example, Integer[]), you get T = Integer and everything works:

Integer[] arr = new Integer[10]; 

for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) { 
    arr[i] = i; 
} 

Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(arr)); 

for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) { 
    System.out.print(arr[i] + " "); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
WOW!!! But everyone said that the changes applied for the list, not with the array arr. Why does this work? – Dmitry Oct 20 '10 at 19:27
3  
Because Arrays.asList() creates a new list that is backed by the array. It does not copy the array as others have stated. Every change to the list returned by Arrays.asList() also changes the array backing it. – ILMTitan Oct 20 '10 at 19:31
    
Understood now. But why that doesn;t work with the primitive types? – Dmitry Oct 20 '10 at 19:37
1  
@Dmitry: Because Java generics don't work with primitive types. See, Arrays.asList() returns List<T>, but you can't declare List<int> in Java. – axtavt Oct 20 '10 at 19:45
3  
T cannot be a primitive type, so in a sense this shouldn't compile for a primitive type. However, because of the varargs, it is valid to call asList with a single object, and it will treat it as an array of size 1. As such, it will compile and work in a confusing way. – Michael McGowan Oct 20 '10 at 19:47

Try adding this line of code to your test:

List l=Arrays.asList(arr);
System.out.println(l);

You will see you are printing out a single element List.

Using Arrays.asList on a primitive array cause asList to treat the int[] as a single object rather than an array. It returns a List<int[]> instead of a List<Integer>. So, you are basically shuffling a single element List and so nothing really gets shuffled.

Notice that some of the answers already given are wrong because asList returns a List backed by the original array, nothing gets copied - all changes are reflected in the orginal array.

share|improve this answer
    
But why does this work in a such way with the primitive type int(treats int[] as a single object)? – Dmitry Oct 20 '10 at 19:35
    
@Dmitry: Arrays are also Objects in Java and I guess the arguments of asList(T...) is interpreted as simple a single Object, since asList does not expect primitives. – MAK Oct 20 '10 at 19:47

That doesn't work because the call to shuffle is operating on the List returned by Arrays.asList, not on the underlying array. Thus, when you iterate over the array to print out the values, nothing has changed. What you want to do is save a reference to the List returned by Arrays.asList, and then print out the values of that List (rather than the values of the array) after you shuffle it.

share|improve this answer
    
The API says - "Returns a fixed-size list backed by the specified array. (Changes to the returned list "write through" to the array.)" - download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/… – Jon Oct 20 '10 at 19:19
    
Thank you for the immediate answer! – Dmitry Oct 20 '10 at 19:19
    
Wrong, any changes made to the list created by Arrays.asList() is made to the array itself - the list uses that array to store the elements. The problem is that asList can not create a list of primitives, so it creates a list with one element: the array itself. It would work for an array with non-primitives (e.g. Integer). – Carlos Heuberger Oct 20 '10 at 22:17
    
You're right! I stand corrected. I learned something today... – Nate W. Oct 21 '10 at 6:05
1  
-1 Incorrect,as pointed out by Carlos. – sleske Jan 29 '11 at 1:17

Store the list resturned by Arrays.asList and shuffle that...

List myShuffledList = Arrays.asList(arr);
Collections.shuffle(myShuffledList);
share|improve this answer
    
it's much better to use generic types instead of raw types – duduamar Oct 20 '10 at 19:52
    
-1 Incorrect,see other answers. – sleske Jan 29 '11 at 1:17

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