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In the below program write() returns -1 while writing to a file.

   #include<sys/types.h>
   #include<sys/stat.h> 
   #include<fcntl.h>   
   #include<stdio.h>   
   #include<unistd.h> 
   #include<stdlib.h>
   int main() {

   int fd_r=0,fd_w=0;
   int w_ret=100;
   fd_r = open("reader.txt", O_RDONLY);

   fd_w = open("writer.txt",O_CREAT,S_IRWXU);

   char *buf = (char *)malloc(50);

   while(read(fd_r,buf,30))
   {

          w_ret =   write(fd_w,buf,30);
          printf("%d", w_ret);
   }
}

Questions: I am unable to debug why this is happening. Correction of code and suggestions as to how to debug such issues are highly appreciated

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't believe that O_CREAT is valid by itself for the flags: try O_CREAT | O_WRONLY.

One way to debug would be checking that the fd_w file descriptor is valid when you first open it.

"The parameter flags is one of O_RDONLY, O_WRONLY or O_RDWR which request opening the file read-only, write-only or read/write, respectively, bitwise-or'd with zero or more of the following..." http://www.linuxmanpages.com/man2/open.2.php

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2  
If you don't specify any read/write flags then O_RDONLY is assumed, since its value is 0. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 20 '10 at 19:28
    
which isn't very useful for a file opened for writing ;) –  KevinDTimm Oct 20 '10 at 19:33
    
This seems like the most likely. –  MarkR Oct 21 '10 at 12:30

at the top of your program

#include <errno.h>

when your open or read returns -1, print the value of errno (defined in errno.h), then look in errno.h for what that error means (you will need this throughout your C life, so I gave you all of this rather than just the solution to this problem)

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no, write returns -1 on all errors and an integer value greater than or equal to 0 on success. errno will contain the reason for the failure. –  KevinDTimm Oct 20 '10 at 19:32
    
@Kevin - +1 Very cool and informative explanation , thanks. –  Eternal Learner Oct 20 '10 at 19:35
3  
You cannot declare extern int errno; or your program has undefined behavior (most likely, a compile-time error, thankfully). errno.h defines errno and you must use its definition. –  R.. Oct 20 '10 at 21:46
    
@R.. on linux errno.h declares errno as an extern int, so there is no problem redeclaring it –  PiedPiper Oct 20 '10 at 23:32
    
@PiedPiper: You're wrong on two levels. First, writing code that's gratuitously specific to a particular implementation and breaks on others is just a stupid idea. And second, the last time any userspace implementation on Linux declared errno like that was probably around 1998, 12 years ago. Maybe you mean the Linux kernelspace headers, but I doubt they even have an errno. –  R.. Oct 21 '10 at 0:00

If you add some error handling, you can learn more. e.g.

  #include<sys/types.h>
   #include<sys/stat.h>
   #include<fcntl.h>
   #include<stdio.h>
   #include<unistd.h>
   #include<stdlib.h>
   int main() {

   int fd_r=0,fd_w=0;
   int w_ret=100;
   fd_r = open("reader.txt", O_RDONLY);
   if(fd_r == -1)
     perror("fd_r open");

   fd_w = open("writer.txt",O_CREAT,S_IRWXU);
   if(fd_w == -1)
     perror("fd_w open");

   char *buf = (char *)malloc(50);

   while(read(fd_r,buf,30))
   {

          w_ret =   write(fd_w,buf,30);
          if(w_ret == -1) {
            perror("write");
            break;
          }
          printf("%d", w_ret);
   }
}

When run , if "reader.txt" does not exist:

$ ./a.out
fd_r open: No such file or directory
write: Bad file descriptor

I.e. not surprisingly, open() failed because the file is missing.

When run, and "reader.txt" does exist:

$ ./a.out
write: Bad file descriptor

This is a bit more subtle, but the documentation for write (man 2 write) says:

EBADF fd is not a valid file descriptor or is not open for writing.

Well. open() didn't fail, so we do have a valid file descriptor. So it's "is not open for writing."

And indeed:

 open("writer.txt",O_CREAT,S_IRWXU);

Should be:

  open("writer.txt",O_CREAT|O_WRONLY,S_IRWXU);
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