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I take no credit for this challenge at all. It's Project Euler problem 6:

The sum of the squares of the first ten natural numbers is,
1^(2) + 2^(2) + ... + 10^(2) = 385

The square of the sum of the first ten natural numbers is,
(1 + 2 + ... + 10)^(2) = 55^(2) = 3025

Hence the difference between the sum of the squares of the first ten natural
numbers and the square of the sum is 3025 − 385 = 2640.

Find the difference between the sum of the squares of the first one hundred 
natural numbers and the square of the sum.

I became interested in some code golfing here when I noticed my solution (in Python) was very, very short. I want to see how some other languages (perl, I'm looking at you!) can bring it in this simple problem.

So, what is the shortest possible way to solve this problem? Shortest means fewest characters in source code.

NOTE: bonus points for solving for the first n natural numbers.

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2  
Thank you to the SO gods for making this a CW question. –  Rafe Kettler Oct 20 '10 at 20:15
6  
I assume that just printing the answer (25164150) in your language of choice subverts the intent of this question. –  Eric Towers Oct 20 '10 at 20:20
2  
You should change it to ask for the first n natural numbers, not the first 100. Otherwise the shortest solution is simply to hardcode the result. –  sepp2k Oct 20 '10 at 20:21
6  
A frankly boring problem to golf. –  dmckee Oct 20 '10 at 20:21
5  
posting projecteuler problems is lame. –  unbeli Oct 20 '10 at 20:28
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20 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Almost Any Language: 20 chars.

(n*n-1)*(3*n+2)*n/12
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40/49 43 characters; should work in most languages

n=100;(n*(n+1)/2)**2-n*(n+1)*(2*n+1)/6;

Should work in some languages;

n=100;n*(n+1)*n*(n+1)/4-n*(n+1)*(2*n+1)/6;

This should work in most of the languages.

Note that 1^2 + 2^2 + ... + n^2 = n(n+1)(2n+1)/6 and 1 + 2 + ... + n = n(n+1)/2

EDIT: oh and for the bonus you just remove the first 6 chracters.

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please, there is a typo in the note for the formula of sum of squares: the denominator should be 6. –  Alex. S. Oct 20 '10 at 20:28
    
you are right; fixed –  Gabi Purcaru Oct 20 '10 at 20:28
    
That was exactly my solution. Note that for the second, you can save a bit (6 characters) by moving the /2 out: n=100;n*(n+1)*n*(n+1)/4-n*(n+1)*(2*n+1)/6 –  poke Oct 20 '10 at 20:30
    
Applying some algebra to this gets you down to 17 characters, see my answer. –  Tim Goodman Oct 20 '10 at 20:51
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Since the "intelligent" solution (that comes from two simple math proofs) has been already posted by @Gabi Purcaru and short solutions for such problem are easy, instead I'll post a long solution based on template metaprogramming, I don't think it's so easy to make it longer without putting in useless garbage/whitespace/....

C++ - 648 659 chars

#include <iostream>

template<int Num>
struct Square
{
    static const int Value = Num*Num;
};

template<int Num>
struct NatSum
{
    static const int Value=Num+NatSum<Num-1>::Value;
};

template<>
struct NatSum<0>
{
    static const int Value = 0;
};

template<int Num>
struct SquaresSum
{
    static const int Value=Square<Num>::Value+SquaresSum<Num-1>::Value;
};

template<>
struct SquaresSum<0>
{
    static const int Value = 0;
};

template<int Num>
struct DifferenceOfSums
{
    static const int Value = Square<NatSum<Num>::Value>::Value - SquaresSum<Num>::Value;
};

int main()
{
    std::cout<<DifferenceOfSums<100>::Value<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Now enjoy your challenge result calculated at compile time and put directly in the executable. :)

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2  
meh... I know why there aren't gode golfs for longest answers.. :P Btw. is anyone thinking this is more readable than a golfed version? –  poke Oct 20 '10 at 20:37
    
@Poke: Maybe in C++ it is. –  Rafe Kettler Oct 20 '10 at 20:41
1  
Wonderful and it's the fastest one too! (For runtime anyway, not compile time). –  Motti Oct 21 '10 at 9:31
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Perl 15 chars:

 print 25164150;
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1  
cat 8 chars: 25164150 –  Winston Ewert Oct 20 '10 at 20:31
3  
@Matteo, in my defence I wrote this before the requirement to solve for N was added :o) –  Motti Oct 20 '10 at 20:32
4  
python 14 chars: print 25164150. Haha, bested. –  Rafe Kettler Oct 20 '10 at 20:45
1  
@Rafe Kettler: say 25164150;: 13 characters, thanks. –  Daenyth Oct 20 '10 at 21:26
2  
@Daenyth: PHP - ?>25164150 –  mattbasta Oct 21 '10 at 20:59
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17 or 18 characters

(3n/2+1)(n^3-n)/6
(3n/2+1)(n**3-n)/6

depending on how your language does exponents

Edit: well, 20 characters (3*n/2+1)*(n**3-n)/6 if your language doesn't understand implicit multiplication... but Mathematica does.

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Also needs exponentiation, which many languages don't have... –  Eamon Nerbonne Oct 21 '10 at 7:30
    
Easy enough to do without exponents, simply expand the exponent for a cost of an additional 2 chars n^3 == n*n*n. –  jball Oct 21 '10 at 15:52
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J, 19 characters

(12%~]*<:@*:*2+3*])

This just calculates n(n^2-1)(3n+2)/12.

J, 21 characters

(([:*:+/)-[:+/*:)i.>:

This actually generates the list of natural numbers up to N (i.>:), then calculates the sum of squares [:*:+/ and square of sums [:+/*:, then subtracts them.

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Mathematica 17 chars: After applying FullSimplify

n(n^2-1)(3n+2)/12

Mathematica 27 chars: As it doesn't require those pesky multiplication symbols...

(n(n+1))^2/4-n(n+1)(2n+1)/6

Or in vector form, Mathematica 2825 chars: after reviewing the other Mathematica answer, I was able to shave off another 3 chars

Plus@@#^2-#.#&@Range[100]
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I love how the syntax highlighting feature doesn't even recognize most of your code as real code. –  Rafe Kettler Oct 20 '10 at 20:42
    
Yes. It is very easy to write line noise in Mathematica. –  Eric Towers Oct 20 '10 at 21:12
    
And perl isn't line noise? –  rcollyer Oct 21 '10 at 13:22
    
+1 #.# is nice :) –  belisarius Oct 22 '10 at 4:24
1  
Plus@@#^2-#.#&@Range[#]& .... one char less and then evaluate as %[100] ... or %[n] for bonus points –  belisarius Oct 22 '10 at 4:29
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Mathematica "Guessing the Answer"

Mathematica is able to "guess" the function that generates some sequences.

So, If you calculate the first six terms for this problem, the result is:

 {0, 4, 22, 70, 170, 350}  

Now we can enter that sequence to the "sequences oracle", and get the function:

FindSequenceFunction[{0, 4, 22, 70, 170, 350}]

Mathematica answers:

1/12 (#-1) (2 # + 5 #^2 + 3 #^3) &  

which is the formula posted anywhere in the other answers.

So we can calculate the 100th term using the first six terms ... without knowing how to generate them!

In> FindSequenceFunction[{0, 4, 22, 70, 170, 350}][100]
Out> 25164150    
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+1, I had no idea that function existed. –  rcollyer Oct 28 '10 at 19:02
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C#

Math.Pow(Enumerable.Range(1, 100).Sum(), 2)-
Enumerable.Range(1, 100).Select(i => i*i).Sum()
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Python 2.x, 48 characters

a=range(n+1)
print sum(a)**2-sum(x*x for x in a)

I originally wrote it in Python 3.x, which is 49 characters:

a=range(n+1)
print(sum(a)**2-sum(x*x for x in a))
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Haskell - 33 chars

g x=sum.map(\y->(y-1)*y*y)$[2..x]

edit:

To make a full program we need 79 chars

import System
main=getArgs>>=print.(\x->sum.map(\y->(y-1)*y*y)$[2..x]).read.head
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Mine was also short...

def euler6(limit):
    """
    calculate the difference between the sum of the squares of
    the first n natural numbers and the square of the sum of
    the same n natural numbers.

      >>> euler6(10)
      2640


    """
    sequence = range(limit+1)
    squares = sum(map(lambda x: x*x, sequence))
    sums = sum(sequence)
    sums *= sums
    return sums-squares
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import numpy
v = numpy.arange(100)
print sum(v)**2 - sum(v*v)
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Mathematica: brute force (39 chars, 6 removable):

    Plus@@# ^2 - Plus@@ (#^2) &@ Range[100]

by means of math, on the fly (70 chars, 24 removable -- we don't have to simplify, specify lower limits, or use a 3 character function name):

    In[1]:= foo[k_] = Simplify[Sum[n, {n, 1, k}]^2 - Sum[n^2, {n, 1, k}]]
            foo[100]
    Out[1]= 1/12 k (-2 - 3 k + 2 k^2 + 3 k^3)
    Out[2]= 25164150

by means of previously performed math (40 chars, 11 removable)

    1/12 # (-2 - 3 # + 2 #^2 + 3 #^3) &@ 100

How short this can be depends on how much prior computation we permit.

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Perl, 41 Chars

This is a 'proper' attempt.

Code: $c+=$_**2,$e+=$_ for 0..pop;print$e**2-$c

Usage:

$ perl -e '$c+=$_**2,$e+=$_ for 0..pop;print$e**2-$c' 100
25164150
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Golfscript - 17 chars

~:).*(3)*2+*)*12/

Reads number from stdin\

23 chars to generate the first 100

100,{:).*(3)*2+*)*12/}%
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Mathematica 8 chars

"My In is your Out"

  In> 25164150
  Out> 25164150

25164150 is a full valid Mathematica expression that can be evaluated on its own.

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Oracle SQL - 82 chars

select sum(l)*sum(l)-sum(l*l) from (select level l from dual connect by level<=:n)
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Here is solution in a C *cheers*

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
//Find the difference between the sum of the squares of the first one hundred natural numbers and the square of the sum.
int main()
{
   int sum1=0,sum2=0,psum=0;

   for(int i=1;i<=100;i++)
   sum1+=i*i;

   for(int i=1;i<=100;i++)
   psum+=i;
   sum2=psum*psum;

   printf("\nDifference is: %d\n",sum2-sum1);


}
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