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I would like to do something like this (I'm aware that this won't compile):

struct Container{
    vector<int> storage;
};

float foo(Container* aContainer){
    if(aContainer!=NULL)
        vector<int>& workingStorage=aContainer->storage;
    else
        vector<int> workingStorage; 


    workingStorage.reserve(1000000);
    ....use workingStorage to calculate something......

    return calculated_result;
}

So - if i pass a Container to the function, i want that the function uses the vector in the container to work with instead of a local variable. If no container is provided, it should use a local variable.

of course I could just in the end of the function copy the local variable to the storage of the Container, but that's not what I want to do.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Create a local std::vector<int> named local_storage for the case where a container is not provided by the caller, then create a reference to whatever container you are actually going to use.

std::vector<int> local_storage;

std::vector<int>& working_storage = aContainer 
                                        ? aContainer->storage 
                                        : local_storage;
share|improve this answer
    
+1: I was going to suggest using a pointer, as this is one use case where references don't cut it (they are not variables). But I really like this solution :-) – André Caron Oct 20 '10 at 21:55
    
@James: You rightly pointed out on my (now deleted) answer that you can't bind a reference to a temporary variable. But doesn't the ternary expression in your code also evaluate to a temporary variable? – Oliver Charlesworth Oct 20 '10 at 21:59
2  
@Oli: Informally and to the best of my recollection, yes. This also allows the conditional operator to be used on the left hand side, as in (expr ? a : b) = T(). – James McNellis Oct 20 '10 at 22:09
1  
@James: Well, +1 for providing me with the thing I learnt today! – Oliver Charlesworth Oct 20 '10 at 22:10
1  
@Oli: The "formal" phrasing is: "If the second and third operands are lvalues and have the same type, the result is of that type and is an lvalue" (C++03 5.16/4). – James McNellis Oct 20 '10 at 22:27

One way to approach this problem is to break the function foo into 2 functions

float foo(Container* aContainer){ 
  if(aContainer!=NULL) {
    return foo_core(aContainer->storage);
  } else { 
    vector<int> workingStorage;  
    return foo_core(workingStorage);
}

float foo_core(vector<int>& workingStorage) { 
  ... 
  // rest of original foo
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 no as nifty as James' but it makes up for it with its clarity. – Matthieu M. Oct 21 '10 at 7:00
vector<int> temp;
vector<int>& workingStorage = (aContainer!=NULL) ? aContainer->storage : temp;
share|improve this answer

The design is apparently horrible. But given that an optional externally provided storage is what you want, JaredPar (his answer) has a good idea. Cleaning that further up:

struct Container
{
    vector<int> storage;
};

double foo( vector<int>& workingStorage )
{
    workingStorage.reserve( 1000000 );
    //....use workingStorage to calculate something......
    return calculated_result;
}

double foo( Container& storageProvider )
{
    return foo( storageProvider.storage );
}

double foo()
{
    vector<int> storage;
    return foo( storage );
}

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer

Why don't you make sure that aContainer->storage is initialized before you pass aContainer it to foo. That makes your code lot more neater. Have an assert statement at the start of the function to check aContainer->storage for NULL.

share|improve this answer
1  
because I do not want to enforce having to provide a container. – Mat Oct 20 '10 at 21:58

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