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I develop in C++, and sometimes I wish I could say something like this:

class Heading : public float    // this line won't compile
{
public:
  Heading( float const value_ )
  : float(value_)               // this line won't compile
  {
    assert( value_ >= 0.0f );
    assert( value_ <= 360.0f );
  }
};

Instead, I have to do something like:

class Heading : public float
{
public:
  Heading( float const value_ )
  : value(value_)
  {
    assert( value >= 0.0f );
    assert( value <= 360.0f );
  } 
private:
  float value;
};

Are there any programming languages out there that allow you to extend value types?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Python.

Everything's an object. So extending float is simple.

class Heading( float ):
   def __init__( self, value ):
       assert 0.0 <= value <= 360.0
       super( Heading, self ).__init__( value )

And yes, 0.0 <= value <= 360.0 is legal syntax.

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1  
360? You heathen. Should be 2 * math.pi! :-P –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 20 '10 at 22:49
1  
@Chris: More like between  − π and π :-) –  Joey Oct 20 '10 at 22:53
1  
Um... The OP was in degrees. And, as a sailor, I use degrees more than radians. –  S.Lott Oct 20 '10 at 22:56
2  
This is not "inheriting from a value type", though, because Python doesn't have value types. Everything is the same, and is equivalent to a reference type in languages in which everything is not the same. –  Porculus Oct 20 '10 at 23:16
2  
@Porculus: While "This is not "inheriting from a value type" may be true, I'm unclear on what actual, discernible, measurable, visible, pragmatic difference can be seen. Especially considering that Python has no value types. What hair are you splitting? It sure looks like what was requested. In what way does it fail to meet the requirements? Other than "philosophically". –  S.Lott Oct 20 '10 at 23:36

In ruby you can go a step further. You can actually modify built in types.

class Float
  class self.heading(val)
    raise RangeError unless (0.0...360.0) === val
    val
  end
end
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Holy crap, that messes up my mind. ;-) –  ShaChris23 Oct 21 '10 at 0:32

Ada allows this to a limited extent: specifically, your example can be expressed in Ada as

type Heading is digits 10
    range 0.0..360.0;

Pascal had a similar feature that was, IIRC, restricted to integers.

I don't know of any languages that allow unrestricted inheritance from primitive types like float. Object-oriented inheritance by definition involves inheriting from a class, which something like C++'s float by definition is not.

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This is subrange typing. It's subtyping, but not really inheritance (at least not in the OO sense of the word). BTW: I really don't understand why so few languages (basically only Pascal and its derivatives) have subrange typing. It's very useful, easy to use, easy to understand and easy to implement. –  Jörg W Mittag Oct 21 '10 at 1:02

D, java, and Objective-C allow deriving from built-in types. In fact most object-oriented languages with built-in types defined to inherit from Object permit inheritance from the built-in types. (I'm sure there's a counterexample and we're about to find out about it in the comments...)

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IMO, the most intriguing answer from your list of languages is D since it's on par with C++ in terms of performance (if not better?) and wins handily in terms of syntax. –  ShaChris23 Oct 20 '10 at 23:01
3  
Value types are not the same thing as built-in types. You cannot inherit from float in Java -- in fact you can't inherit from the equivalent reference type Float either, though that's a library issue rather than a language issue. Objective-C has the same limitation. I don't know about D. –  Porculus Oct 20 '10 at 23:17
    
C# is a counter-example: all ValueTypes (including built-in int, bool, etc.) inherit from Object but are 'sealed'. –  Stephen Swensen Oct 20 '10 at 23:32

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