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A friend was in need of an algorithm that would let him loop through the elements of an NxM matrix (N and M are odd). I came up with a solution, but I wanted to see if my fellow SO'ers could come up with a better solution.

I'm posting my solution as an answer to this question.

Example Output:

For a 3x3 matrix, the output should be:

(0, 0) (1, 0) (1, 1) (0, 1) (-1, 1) (-1, 0) (-1, -1) (0, -1) (1, -1)

3x3 matrix

Furthermore, the algorithm should support non-square matrices, so for example for a 5x3 matrix, the output should be:

(0, 0) (1, 0) (1, 1) (0, 1) (-1, 1) (-1, 0) (-1, -1) (0, -1) (1, -1) (2, -1) (2, 0) (2, 1) (-2, 1) (-2, 0) (-2, -1)

5x3 matrix

share|improve this question
    
Can you explain what you want for non-square matrices? Your solution has a "jump" from (2,1) to (-2,1) -- is this intended? [E.g. for a 7x3 matrix, it would have two more "jumps", and for a (2k+1)x3 matrix it would have 2k-3 jumps?] –  ShreevatsaR Dec 29 '08 at 18:56
1  
Yes, the jumps are intentional. I've updated the question with a 5x3 matrix image. As you can see from the image, we're skipping the top and bottom rows. –  Can Berk Güder Dec 29 '08 at 19:30
    
Ok, then your own code seems cleanest. And although this is offtopic: how did you generate those images? :) –  ShreevatsaR Dec 29 '08 at 19:34
    
=)) I did not generate them. In fact, the way I created them is quite stupid. I created the tables in OO.org Calc, took a screenshot, and edited the screenshot in GIMP. =)) –  Can Berk Güder Dec 30 '08 at 11:26
1  
@Ying: I don't really know why my friend needs this, but he said he wants to favor members of the matrix closer to the center in a search algorithm. –  Can Berk Güder Dec 30 '08 at 22:08
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15 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Here's my solution (in Python):

def spiral(X, Y):
	x = y = 0
	dx = 0
	dy = -1
	for i in range(max(X, Y)**2):
		if (-X/2 < x <= X/2) and (-Y/2 < y <= Y/2):
			print (x, y)
			# DO STUFF...
		if x == y or (x < 0 and x == -y) or (x > 0 and x == 1-y):
			dx, dy = -dy, dx
		x, y = x+dx, y+dy
share|improve this answer
    
This is the best way of writing it, as far as I can see. The only possible improvement would be to make it O(MN) instead of O(max(M,N)^2) by directly skipping past those (x,y) that are not going to be printed, but that will make the code a bit more ugly. –  ShreevatsaR Dec 29 '08 at 19:20
    
I'm optimizing my solution and it's pretty close to what you've already got. This is a pretty good solution I think. Besides ShreevatsaR's suggestion, and stuff like not calculating x/2 and y/2 each iteration, there's not too much to improve on except style. –  Triptych Dec 29 '08 at 20:03
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C++ anyone? Quick translation from python, posted for completeness

void Spiral( int X, int Y){
    int x,y,dx,dy;
    x = y = dx =0;
    dy = -1;
    int t = std::max(X,Y);
    int maxI = t*t;
    for(int i =0; i < maxI; i++){
        if ((-X/2 <= x) && (x <= X/2) && (-Y/2 <= y) && (y <= Y/2)){
            // DO STUFF...
        }
        if( (x == y) || ((x < 0) && (x == -y)) || ((x > 0) && (x == 1-y))){
            t = dx;
            dx = -dy;
            dy = t;
        }
        x += dx;
        y += dy;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you can also use s and ds like I do to detect the corners which gets rid of the huge if condition –  gnibbler Oct 13 '09 at 0:11
1  
An edit to this post was suggested here. Although the edit was rejected because it changes the meaning of your post, you might want to consider incorporating the suggested changes if it makes sense to do so. –  Robert Harvey Jan 30 '13 at 0:46
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I love python's generators.

def spiral(N, M):
    x,y = 0,0   
    dx, dy = 0, -1

    for dumb in xrange(N*M):
        if abs(x) == abs(y) and [dx,dy] != [1,0] or x>0 and y == 1-x:  
            dx, dy = -dy, dx            # corner, change direction

        if abs(x)>N/2 or abs(y)>M/2:    # non-square
            dx, dy = -dy, dx            # change direction
            x, y = -y+dx, x+dy          # jump

        yield x, y
        x, y = x+dx, y+dy

Testing with:

print 'Spiral 3x3:'
for a,b in spiral(3,3):
    print (a,b),

print '\n\nSpiral 5x3:'
for a,b in spiral(5,3):
    print (a,b),

You get:

Spiral 3x3:
(0, 0) (1, 0) (1, 1) (0, 1) (-1, 1) (-1, 0) (-1, -1) (0, -1) (1, -1) 

Spiral 5x3:
(0, 0) (1, 0) (1, 1) (0, 1) (-1, 1) (-1, 0) (-1, -1) (0, -1) (1, -1) (2, -1) (2, 0) (2, 1) (-2, 1) (-2, 0) (-2, -1)
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Here is my solution (In Ruby)

def spiral(xDim, yDim)
   sx = xDim / 2
   sy = yDim / 2

   cx = cy = 0
   direction = distance = 1

   yield(cx,cy)
   while(cx.abs <= sx || cy.abs <= sy)
      distance.times { cx += direction; yield(cx,cy) if(cx.abs <= sx && cy.abs <= sy); } 
      distance.times { cy += direction; yield(cx,cy) if(cx.abs <= sx && cy.abs <= sy); } 
      distance += 1
      direction *= -1
   end
end

spiral(5,3) { |x,y|
   print "(#{x},#{y}),"
}
share|improve this answer
    
Still O(max(n,m)^2), but nice style. –  Triptych Dec 29 '08 at 20:16
1  
direction=-direction instead of direction*=-1? if you were golfing d=-d is shorter than d*=-1 too –  gnibbler Oct 12 '09 at 22:30
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TDD, in Java.

SpiralTest.java:

import java.awt.Point;
import java.util.List;

import junit.framework.TestCase;

public class SpiralTest extends TestCase {

    public void test3x3() throws Exception {
    	assertEquals("(0, 0) (1, 0) (1, 1) (0, 1) (-1, 1) (-1, 0) (-1, -1) (0, -1) (1, -1)", strung(new Spiral(3, 3).spiral()));
    }

    public void test5x3() throws Exception {
    	assertEquals("(0, 0) (1, 0) (1, 1) (0, 1) (-1, 1) (-1, 0) (-1, -1) (0, -1) (1, -1) (2, -1) (2, 0) (2, 1) (-2, 1) (-2, 0) (-2, -1)",
    			strung(new Spiral(5, 3).spiral()));
    }

    private String strung(List<Point> points) {
    	StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
    	for (Point point : points)
    		sb.append(strung(point));
    	return sb.toString().trim();
    }

    private String strung(Point point) {
    	return String.format("(%s, %s) ", point.x, point.y);
    }

}

Spiral.java:

import java.awt.Point;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Spiral {
    private enum Direction {
	E(1, 0) {Direction next() {return N;}},
	N(0, 1) {Direction next() {return W;}},
	W(-1, 0) {Direction next() {return S;}},
	S(0, -1) {Direction next() {return E;}},;

    	private int	dx;
    	private int	dy;

    	Point advance(Point point) {
    		return new Point(point.x + dx, point.y + dy);
    	}

    	abstract Direction next();

    	Direction(int dx, int dy) {
    		this.dx = dx;
    		this.dy = dy;
    	}
    };
    private final static Point ORIGIN = new Point(0, 0);
    private final int	width;
    private final int	height;
    private Point		point;
    private Direction	direction	= Direction.E;
    private List<Point>	list = new ArrayList<Point>();

    public Spiral(int width, int height) {
    	this.width = width;
    	this.height = height;
    }

    public List<Point> spiral() {
    	point = ORIGIN;
    	int steps = 1;
    	while (list.size() < width * height) {
    		advance(steps);
    		advance(steps);
    		steps++;
    	}
    	return list;
    }

    private void advance(int n) {
    	for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    		if (inBounds(point))
    			list.add(point);
    		point = direction.advance(point);
    	}
    	direction = direction.next();
    }

    private boolean inBounds(Point p) {
    	return between(-width / 2, width / 2, p.x) && between(-height / 2, height / 2, p.y);
    }

    private static boolean between(int low, int high, int n) {
    	return low <= n && n <= high;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is not quite 'code golf' :) –  leppie Jul 30 '09 at 15:49
    
@leppie: Maybe not - certainly not short enough - but I think it's a good demonstration of TDD, and reasonably clean, easy-to-understand, correct code. I'll leave it in. –  Carl Manaster Jul 30 '09 at 16:26
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Java spiral "Code golf" attempt, based on the C++ variant.

public static void Spiral(int X, int Y) {
    int x=0, y=0, dx = 0, dy = -1;
    int t = Math.max(X,Y);
    int maxI = t*t;

    for (int i=0; i < maxI; i++){
        if ((-X/2 <= x) && (x <= X/2) && (-Y/2 <= y) && (y <= Y/2)) {
            System.out.println(x+","+y);
            //DO STUFF
        }

        if( (x == y) || ((x < 0) && (x == -y)) || ((x > 0) && (x == 1-y))) {
            t=dx; dx=-dy; dy=t;
        }   
        x+=dx; y+=dy;
    }
}
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Here's a O(1) solution to find the position in a squared spiral : Fiddle

function spiral(n) {
    // given n an index in the squared spiral
    // p the sum of point in inner square
    // a the position on the current square
    // n = p + a

    var r = Math.floor((Math.sqrt(n + 1) - 1) / 2) + 1;

    // compute radius : inverse arithmetic sum of 8+16+24+...=
    var p = (8 * r * (r - 1)) / 2;
    // compute total point on radius -1 : arithmetic sum of 8+16+24+...

    var en = r * 2;
    // points by face

    var a = (1 + n - p) % (r * 8);
    // compute de position and shift it so the first is (-r,-r) but (-r+1,-r)
    // so square can connect

    var pos = [0, 0, r];
    switch (Math.floor(a / (r * 2))) {
        // find the face : 0 top, 1 right, 2, bottom, 3 left
        case 0:
            {
                pos[0] = a - r;
                pos[1] = -r;
            }
            break;
        case 1:
            {
                pos[0] = r;
                pos[1] = (a % en) - r;

            }
            break;
        case 2:
            {
                pos[0] = r - (a % en);
                pos[1] = r;
            }
            break;
        case 3:
            {
                pos[0] = -r;
                pos[1] = r - (a % en);
            }
            break;
    }
    console.log("n : ", n, " r : ", r, " p : ", p, " a : ", a, "  -->  ", pos);
    return pos;
}
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Haskell, take your pick:

spiral x y = (0, 0) : concatMap ring [1 .. max x' y'] where
    ring n | n > x' = left x' n  ++ right x' (-n)
    ring n | n > y' = up   n  y' ++ down (-n) y'
    ring n          = up n n ++ left n n ++ down n n ++ right n n
    up    x y = [(x, n) | n <- [1-y .. y]]; down = (.) reverse . up
    right x y = [(n, y) | n <- [1-x .. x]]; left = (.) reverse . right
    (x', y') = (x `div` 2, y `div` 2)

spiral x y = filter (\(x',y') -> 2*abs x' <= x && 2*abs y' <= y) .
             scanl (\(a,b) (c,d) -> (a+c,b+d)) (0,0) $
             concat [ (:) (1,0) . tail 
                    $ concatMap (replicate n) [(0,1),(-1,0),(0,-1),(1,0)]
                    | n <- [2,4..max x y] ]
share|improve this answer
10  
Please don't take this as a rant or a troll's comment, but GOD is haskell ugly! –  Petruza Jul 28 '09 at 21:48
    
I could not agree with the above comment more. –  Sneakyness Jul 28 '09 at 21:59
    
This Haskell looks very trendy to me. –  user181548 Oct 13 '09 at 0:20
    
Yes, but note how expressive it is. Compare its length with some of the other examples posted here. –  Robert Harvey Jan 30 '13 at 0:54
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This is in C.

I happened to choose bad variable names. In the names T == top, L == left, B == bottom, R == right. So, tli is top left i and brj is bottom right j.

#include<stdio.h>

typedef enum {
   TLTOR = 0,
   RTTOB,
   BRTOL,
   LBTOT
} Direction;

int main() {
   int arr[][3] = {{1,2,3},{4,5,6}, {7,8,9}, {10,11,12}};
   int tli = 0, tlj = 0, bri = 3, brj = 2;
   int i;
   Direction d = TLTOR;

   while (tli < bri || tlj < brj) {
     switch (d) {
     case TLTOR:
    for (i = tlj; i <= brj; i++) {
       printf("%d ", arr[tli][i]);
    }
    tli ++;
    d = RTTOB;
    break;
     case RTTOB:
    for (i = tli; i <= bri; i++) {
       printf("%d ", arr[i][brj]);
    }
    brj --;
    d = BRTOL;
    break;
     case BRTOL:
    for (i = brj; i >= tlj; i--) {
       printf("%d ", arr[bri][i]);
    }
    bri --;
        d = LBTOT;
    break;
     case LBTOT:
    for (i = bri; i >= tli; i--) {
       printf("%d ", arr[i][tlj]);
    }
    tlj ++;
        d = TLTOR;
    break;
 }
   }
   if (tli == bri == tlj == brj) {
      printf("%d\n", arr[tli][tlj]);
   }
}
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This is based on your own solution, but we can be smarter about finding the corners. This makes it easier to see how you might skip over the areas outside if M and N are very different.

def spiral(X, Y):
    x = y = 0
    dx = 0
    dy = -1
    s=0
    ds=2
    for i in range(max(X, Y)**2):
            if abs(x) <= X and abs(y) <= Y/2:
                    print (x, y)
                    # DO STUFF...
            if i==s:
                    dx, dy = -dy, dx
                    s, ds = s+ds/2, ds+1
            x, y = x+dx, y+dy

and a generator based solution that is better than O(max(n,m)^2), It is O(nm+abs(n-m)^2) because it skips whole strips if they are not part of the solution.

def spiral(X,Y):
X = X+1>>1
Y = Y+1>>1
x = y = 0
d = side = 1
while x<X or y<Y:
    if abs(y)<Y:
        for x in range(x, x+side, d):
            if abs(x)<X: yield x,y
        x += d
    else:
        x += side
    if abs(x)<X:
        for y in range(y, y+side, d):
            if abs(y)<Y: yield x,y
        y += d
    else:
        y += side
    d =-d
    side = d-side
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Here's c#, linq'ish.

public static class SpiralCoords
{
  public static IEnumerable<Tuple<int, int>> GenerateOutTo(int radius)
  {
    //TODO trap negative radius.  0 is ok.

    foreach(int r in Enumerable.Range(0, radius + 1))
    {
      foreach(Tuple<int, int> coord in GenerateRing(r))
      {
        yield return coord;
      }
    }
  }

  public static IEnumerable<Tuple<int, int>> GenerateRing(int radius)
  {
    //TODO trap negative radius.  0 is ok.

    Tuple<int, int> currentPoint = Tuple.Create(radius, 0);
    yield return Tuple.Create(currentPoint.Item1, currentPoint.Item2);

    //move up while we can
    while (currentPoint.Item2 < radius)
    {
      currentPoint.Item2 += 1;
      yield return Tuple.Create(currentPoint.Item1, currentPoint.Item2);
    }
    //move left while we can
    while (-radius < currentPoint.Item1)
    {
      currentPoint.Item1 -=1;
      yield return Tuple.Create(currentPoint.Item1, currentPoint.Item2);    
    }
    //move down while we can
    while (-radius < currentPoint.Item2)
    {
      currentPoint.Item2 -= 1;
      yield return Tuple.Create(currentPoint.Item1, currentPoint.Item2);
    }
    //move right while we can
    while (currentPoint.Item1 < radius)
    {
      currentPoint.Item1 +=1;
      yield return Tuple.Create(currentPoint.Item1, currentPoint.Item2);    
    }
    //move up while we can
    while (currentPoint.Item2 < -1)
    {
      currentPoint.Item2 += 1;
      yield return Tuple.Create(currentPoint.Item1, currentPoint.Item2);
    }
  }

}

The question's first example (3x3) would be:

var coords = SpiralCoords.GenerateOutTo(1);

The question's second example (5x3) would be:

var coords = SpiralCoords.GenerateOutTo(2).Where(x => abs(x.Item2) < 2);
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Here is my attempt for simple C solution. First print the outer spiral and move one block inside..and repeat.

#define ROWS        5
#define COLS        5
//int A[ROWS][COLS] = { {1, 2, 3, 4}, {5, 6, 7, 8}, {11, 12, 13, 14}, {15, 16, 17, 18} };
//int A[ROWS][COLS] = { {1, 2, 3}, {6, 7, 8}, { 12, 13, 14} };
//int A[ROWS][COLS] = { {1, 2}, {3, 4}};

int A[ROWS][COLS] = { {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, {6, 7, 8, 9, 10}, {11, 12, 13, 14, 15} , {16, 17, 18, 19, 20}, {21, 22, 23, 24, 25} };


void print_spiral(int rows, int cols)
{
    int row = 0;
    int offset = 0;

    while (offset < (ROWS - 1)) {
        /* print one outer loop at a time. */
        for (int col = offset; col <= cols; col++) {
            printf("%d ", A[offset][col]);
        }

        for (row = offset + 1; row <= rows; row++) {
            printf("%d ", A[row][cols]);
        }

        for (int col = cols - 1; col >= offset; col--) {
            printf("%d ", A[rows][col]);
        }

        for (row = rows - 1; row >= offset + 1; row--) {
            printf("%d ", A[row][offset]);
        }

       /* Move one block inside */
        offset++;
        rows--;
        cols--;
    }
    printf("\n");
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    print_spiral(ROWS-1, COLS-1);
    return 0;
}
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This is my very very bad solution, made from bare minimum knowledge of Java. Here I have to place units on a field in a spiral. Units cannot be placed on top of other units or on mountains or in the ocean.

To be clear. This is not a good solution. This is a very bad solution added for the fun of other people to laugh at how bad it can be done

private void unitPlacementAlgorithm(Position p, Unit u){
    int i = p.getRow();
    int j = p.getColumn();

    int iCounter = 1;
    int jCounter = 0;

    if (getUnitAt(p) == null) {
            unitMap.put(p, u);
    } else {
        iWhileLoop(i, j, iCounter, jCounter, -1, u);
    }

}

private void iWhileLoop(int i, int j, int iCounter, int jCounter, int fortegn, Unit u){
    if(iCounter == 3) {
        for(int k = 0; k < 3; k++) {
            if(k == 2) { //This was added to make the looping stop after 9 units
                System.out.println("There is no more room around the city");
                return; 
            }
            i--;

            if (getUnitAt(new Position(i, j)) == null 
                && !(getTileAt(new Position(i, j)).getTypeString().equals(GameConstants.OCEANS)) 
                && !(getTileAt(new Position(i, j)).getTypeString().equals(GameConstants.MOUNTAINS))) {
                    unitMap.put(new Position(i, j), u);
                    return;
            }
            iCounter--;
        }
    }

    while (iCounter > 0) {
        if (fortegn > 0) {
            i++;
        } else {
            i--;
        }

        if (getUnitAt(new Position(i, j)) == null 
            && !(getTileAt(new Position(i, j)).getTypeString().equals(GameConstants.OCEANS)) 
            && !(getTileAt(new Position(i, j)).getTypeString().equals(GameConstants.MOUNTAINS))) {
                unitMap.put(new Position(i, j), u);
                return;
        }
        iCounter--;
        jCounter++;
    }
    fortegn *= -1;
    jWhileLoop(i, j, iCounter, jCounter, fortegn, u);
}

private void jWhileLoop(int i, int j, int iCounter, int jCounter,
        int fortegn, Unit u) {
    while (jCounter > 0) {
        if (fortegn > 0) {
            j++;
        } else {
            j--;
        }

        if (getUnitAt(new Position(i, j)) == null 
            && !(getTileAt(new Position(i, j)).getTypeString().equals(GameConstants.OCEANS)) 
            && !(getTileAt(new Position(i, j)).getTypeString().equals(GameConstants.MOUNTAINS))) {
                unitMap.put(new Position(i, j), u);
                return;

        }
        jCounter--;
        iCounter++;
        if (jCounter == 0) {
            iCounter++;
        }

    }
    iWhileLoop(i, j, iCounter, jCounter, fortegn, u);
}

Cudos to anyone who can actually read this

Bonus question: What is the running time of this "algorithm"? :P

share|improve this answer
    
+1 because of "This is a very bad solution added for the fun of other people to laugh at how bad it can be done". –  Oriol Dec 29 '13 at 20:03
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This is a slightly different version - trying to use recursion and iterators in LUA. At each step the program descends further inside the matrix and loops. I also added an extra flag to spiral clockwise or anticlockwise. The output starts from the bottom right corners and loops recursively towards the center.

local row, col, clockwise

local SpiralGen
SpiralGen = function(loop)  -- Generator of elements in one loop
    local startpos = { x = col - loop, y = row - loop }
    local IteratePosImpl = function() -- This function calculates returns the cur, next position in a loop. If called without check, it loops infinitely

        local nextpos = {x = startpos.x, y = startpos.y}        
        local step = clockwise and {x = 0, y = -1} or { x = -1, y = 0 }

        return function()

            curpos = {x = nextpos.x, y = nextpos.y}
            nextpos.x = nextpos.x + step.x
            nextpos.y = nextpos.y + step.y
            if (((nextpos.x == loop or nextpos.x == col - loop + 1) and step.y == 0) or 
                ((nextpos.y == loop or nextpos.y == row - loop + 1) and step.x == 0)) then --Hit a corner in the loop

                local tempstep = {x = step.x, y = step.y}
                step.x = clockwise and tempstep.y or -tempstep.y
                step.y = clockwise and -tempstep.x or tempstep.x
                -- retract next step with new step
                nextpos.x = curpos.x + step.x 
                nextpos.y = curpos.y + step.y

            end         
            return curpos, nextpos
        end
    end
    local IteratePos = IteratePosImpl() -- make an instance
    local curpos, nextpos = IteratePos()
    while (true) do
        if(nextpos.x == startpos.x and nextpos.y == startpos.y) then            
            coroutine.yield(curpos)
            SpiralGen(loop+1) -- Go one step inner, since we're done with this loop
            break -- done with inner loop, get out
        else
            if(curpos.x < loop + 1 or curpos.x > col - loop or curpos.y < loop + 1 or curpos.y > row - loop) then
                break -- done with all elemnts, no place to loop further, break out of recursion
            else
                local curposL = {x = curpos.x, y = curpos.y}
                curpos, nextpos = IteratePos()
                coroutine.yield(curposL)
            end
        end     
    end 
end


local Spiral = function(rowP, colP, clockwiseP)
    row = rowP
    col = colP
    clockwise = clockwiseP
    return coroutine.wrap(function() SpiralGen(0) end) -- make a coroutine that returns all the values as an iterator
end


--test
for pos in Spiral(10,2,true) do
    print (pos.y, pos.x)
end

for pos in Spiral(10,9,false) do
    print (pos.y, pos.x)
end
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Solution for AutoIt

#include <Math.au3>
#include <Array.au3>

Func SpiralSearch($xMax,$yMax)
    $x = 0
    $y = 0
    $dx = 0
    $dy = -1
    for $i=0 To _max($xMax, $yMax)^2-1 Step 1
        if -$xMax/2 < $x and $x <= $xMax/2 And -$yMax/2 < $y And $y <= $yMax/2 Then
            MsgBox(0, "We are here ", $x & " " & $y)
        EndIf
        if $x == $y or ($x < 0 and $x == -$y) or ($x > 0 and $x == 1-$y) Then
            _ArraySwap ($dx, $dy)
            $dx=-$dx
        EndIf
        $x += $dx
        $y += $dy
    Next
EndFunc
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