Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would to block child classes from overriding a base method and have the child classes override a new method in a parental class. In other words, a child class of the base class blocks the base class methods and delegates to a new method that further child classes must override. I still want the base class method to be available.

Here is an example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

struct Base
{
    virtual const std::string&  class_name(void) = 0;
};

struct Level1
    : public Base
{
private:  // Prevent child classes from overriding
          //     the Base::class_name method 
    const std::string& class_name(void)
        {
            static std::string name;
            name = "class" + class_name_from_level_1();
            return name;
        }
protected:
    // This is the "new" or redirected class that child classes
    //    must override.
    virtual const std::string& class_name_from_level_1(void) = 0;
};

struct Level2
    : public Level1
{
    static std::string  name;

    const std::string&  class_name_from_level_1(void)
        {
            if (name.length() == 0)
            {
                name = "Level2";
            }
            return name;
        }
};


int main(void)
{
    Level2  lev2;
    std::cout << lev2.class_name() << "\n";
    return 0;
}

I am getting the following errors from g++:

$ g++ hiding_virt_methods.cpp -o hiding_virt_methods.exe
hiding_virt_methods.cpp: In function `int main()':
hiding_virt_methods.cpp:15: error: `virtual const std::string& Level1::class_name()' is private
hiding_virt_methods.cpp:43: error: within this context

In the above example, I want the following chain of execution for Level2:
Base::class_name() --> Level1::class_name_from_level_1() --> Level2::class_name_from_level_1()

Also, I only want to block inheritance of specific methods in the Base class. Protected and Private Inheritance affect all the public methods.

So how do I stop the chain of inheritance of specific Base methods at different levels in the inheritance tree?

Edit: Real world example.
I have an interface class Record. Class Record_With_Id inherits from class Record and adds an ID field. The class Record contains an accept_visitor method. Class Record_With_Id overrides accept_visitor to apply to the ID field, then calls a virtual method, record_with_id_accept_visitor, which descendants must implement.

share|improve this question
    
Declaring class_name private doesn't mean that it can't be overridden, it means that subclasses can't access it. Is that what you wanted? –  EboMike Oct 21 '10 at 1:24
    
You shoult try to clarify the language of your problem statement. –  David Reis Oct 21 '10 at 1:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For your immediate problem, you can rename your class_name() functions to class_name_impl() or similar, then in the base class have a class_name() function that calls the implementation one. That way, only the base class version will match when calling class_name() on a derived object.

More generally, you can frustrate attempts to call the base class methods by having same-named functions in the derived classes - as you've done, but anyone can cast to a Base& and call whatever they like. You can't stop virtual methods being overridable in derived classes... you can only frustrate their use.

It's worth remembering that a publicly derived class IS an instance of the base class, and SHOULD provide the base class's interface.

EDIT: re yout "real world example" edit, can you explain the problem with a normal implementation ala...

#include <iostream>

struct Visitor
{
    virtual void operator()(int&) const = 0;
};

struct X
{
    virtual void visit(Visitor& v) { v(a); v(b); }
    int a;
    int b;
};

struct X_with_C : X
{
    int c;
    virtual void visit(Visitor& v) { X::visit(v); v(c); }
};

struct My_Visitor : Visitor
{
    void operator()(int& n) const { std::cout << ++n << '\n'; }
};

int main()
{
    X x;
    x.a = 10;
    x.b = 20;
    My_Visitor visitor;
    x.visit(visitor);
    X_with_C xc;
    xc.a = -10;
    xc.b = -20;
    xc.c = -30;
    xc.visit(visitor);
    X& rx = xc;
    rx.visit(visitor);
}

Output:

11
21
-9
-19
-29
-8
-18
-28
share|improve this answer
    
In your example, the leaf class method calls the parent method, going "up" the inheritance tree. In my example, the parent method calls the child method, going "down" the tree. I will try changing the calling "direction" and see if it resolves the issue. –  Thomas Matthews Oct 21 '10 at 14:02

hasn't C++11 added final and override?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B11#Explicit_overrides_and_final

share|improve this answer
    
I've just saw you answer, sorry about duplicate. +1. –  Nemanja Boric Apr 12 '14 at 9:13

Four years later, let me add that C++11 has introduced keyword final:

class Base final {

This can also be applied on the virtual methods:

class Base{
 protected: 
        virtual void doWork() = 0;
 public:
        virtual void startWork() final { doWork(); }

};


class Derived: public Base{
 protected:
        virtual void doWork() override { /* some work */ }
 public:
       //  error: overriding final function ‘virtual void Base::startWork()’
        virtual void startWork() override { /* something else */ } 


};
share|improve this answer

Visual Studio 2005 and above implement a keyword "sealed", which is a Microsoft extension to C++. You put it in the declaration of Level1::class_name(). I don't think there is a portable way.

share|improve this answer
    
    
I would never recommend using the so called "extensions", they are not part of C++ whichever way you look –  Ion Todirel Feb 20 '12 at 10:55
1  
And depending on MS extensions is even worse than depending on GNU extensions: With MS extensions, you rely on MS to sell you licences of their software. If they decide to dump support for the extension in the next release, you are doomed. With GNU extensions, you rely on free software; software that you are free to download the sources, free to compile them, free to fork them if need be, free to do whatever you need to do to use the extension you want, even if the GNU guys should cut support for this feature. –  cmaster Apr 12 '14 at 8:42

It appears that you're trying to do something in a way that's hard.

Depending on what it is that you're trying to achieve, the following may be a solution.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

struct Base
{
    virtual std::string class_name() const = 0;
};

class Level1
    : public Base
{
public:
    std::string class_description() const
    {
        return "class " + class_name();
    }
};

class Level2
    : public Level1
{
public:
    virtual std::string class_name() const
    {
       return "Level2";
    }
};


int main()
{
    Level2  lev2;
    std::cout << lev2.class_description() << "\n";
}

In the above code I've assumed it's for debugging/tracing or something like that. For id purposes look into typeid (a built-in operator).

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mind explaining a bit more? –  user295190 Oct 21 '10 at 2:11
1  
@Shiftbit: OK, but what? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 21 '10 at 2:13
    
@Alf P. Steinbach: This seems to the opposite of what the OP asked at Level1: "Prevent child classes from overriding the Base::class_name method". You seem to be overriding the class_name in Level2. –  user295190 Oct 21 '10 at 2:54
1  
@Shiftbit: Oh, it has nothing to do with preventing overriding, which was the OP's imagined solution to some problem. It has to do with (hopefully) solving the problem, which unfortunately was not described. Explaining a bit more: it shows how, by giving different things different names, like class_name versus class_description, one can avoid problems stemming from those things having the same name. :-) Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 21 '10 at 2:58
    
@Alf: ahh... makes sense! Thank you. –  user295190 Oct 21 '10 at 3:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.