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This is a very noobish mistake, but I dont know whats happening here.

There are loads of pimpl examples but I dont understand why this isn't working (this was one of the examples more or less but I dont see the difference).

I have a very simple Pimpl example, but it wont work.

// Foo.hpp
#include <boost/scoped_ptr.hpp>

class Foo
{
 struct Bar;
 //boost::scoped_ptr<Bar> pImpl;
 Bar* pImpl;

public:
 Foo();
 ~Foo() {}

 int returnValue();

private:

};

and

// Foo.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

struct Foo::Bar
{ 
 Bar() {}
 ~Bar() {}
 int value;
};

Foo::Foo() : pImpl(new Bar())
{
 pImpl->value = 7;
}

int Foo::returnValue() {
 return *pImpl->value;
}

Compiling this gives me the error. C2100: illegal indirection.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe it's just because it's an example, but in Bar you shouldn't explicitly define empty special member functions. Let the compiler do it. –  GManNickG Oct 21 '10 at 9:07
    
I added them in an attempt to resolve the error. –  PhilCK Oct 21 '10 at 9:16
    
As it is, the pimpl will leak, uncommenting the scoped_ptr will cause undefined behavior (if it even compiles). In general, when implementing the PIMPL idiom (unless you use a smart pointer that handles it, like shared_ptr) you need to declare the destructor in the header, but implement it in the cpp file (even if the implementation of the destructor is empty because resources are handled in smart pointers) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 21 '10 at 10:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

int returnValue() should be a member function:

//  vvvvv
int Foo::returnValue() {
 return pImpl->value; // no need to dereference, value isn't a pointer
}

You need to define your constructor, copy-constructor, copy assignment operator, and destructor after the implementation class has been defined. (Otherwise the implicit destructor is dangerous, and scoped_ptr won't let you do that):

// Foo.hpp
#include <boost/scoped_ptr.hpp>

class Foo
{
    struct Bar;
    boost::scoped_ptr<Bar> pImpl;

public:
    Foo();
    ~Foo();

    int returnValue(); // could be const (so should be)

private:
    // just disable copying, like scoped_ptr
    Foo(const Foo&); // not defined
    Foo& operator=(const Foo&); // not defined
};

And:

// Foo.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

struct Foo::Bar
{ 
    int value;
};

Foo::Foo() :
pImpl(new Bar())
{
    pImpl->value = 7;
}

Foo::~Foo()
{
    // okay, Bar defined at this point; scoped_ptr can work
}

int Foo::returnValue()
{
    return pImpl->value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that got lost when transferring the example between computers. I thought the error was different. I get illegal indirection now. –  PhilCK Oct 21 '10 at 9:14
1  
@Phil: Please see the other comment in my answer. value isn't a pointer, why are you trying to dereference it? –  GManNickG Oct 21 '10 at 9:15
    
Ah cool thanks. Any idea when I switch the ptr to boost::scoped_ptr why I get undefined type Foo::Bar and negiative subscript error? –  PhilCK Oct 21 '10 at 9:20
    
@Phil: Can you post that code? That error sounds like a static assert (a compile time error purposefully triggered because some condition wasn't met; can be done by making a negatively sized array). The thing is, you cannot use the implicit special member functions for pimpl, because the implementation class isn't defined until later. You have to do this. (Edited) –  GManNickG Oct 21 '10 at 9:30
    
The code was above with the scoped_ptr line commented out. your code gets rid of the errors but leaves me with Foo::Foo(void) already has a body. –  PhilCK Oct 21 '10 at 9:39

As an aside, you may have a problem using boost::scoped_ptr for a pImpl because your pImpl is forwardly declared and you may find that the class needs to be fully visible in order to call scoped_ptr's destructor (which deletes the underlying).

Some compilers will allow you to work around this by putting the body of your destructor in the compilation unit (the .cpp file) where the class is visible.

The simplest solution is that if your destructor has to be implemented anyway you may as well just use a raw pointer and have your destructor delete it. And if you want to use something from boost to help you, derive your outer class from boost::noncopyable. Otherwise ensure you handle copy-construction and assignment properly.

You can use shared_ptr to your pImpl. You can then copy your outer class around happily although they share the same underlying unless you overload the copy-constructor and assignment operator to do otherwise.

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