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See subject, note that this question only applies to the .NET compact framework. This happens on the emulators that ship with Windows Mobile 6 Professional SDK as well as on my English HTC Touch Pro (all .NET CF 3.5). iso-8859-1 stands for Western European (ISO), which is probably the most important encoding besides us-ascii (at least when one goes by the number of usenet posts).

I'm having a hard time to understand why this encoding is not supported, while the following ones are supported (again on both the emulators & my HTC):

  • iso-8859-2 (Central European (ISO))
  • iso-8859-3 (Latin 3 (ISO))
  • iso-8859-4 (Baltic (ISO))
  • iso-8859-5 (Cyrillic (ISO))
  • iso-8859-7 (Greek (ISO))

So, is support for say Greek more important than support for German, French and Spanish? Can anyone shed some light on this?

Thanks!

Andreas

share|improve this question

I would try to use "windows-1252" as encoding string. According to Wikipedia, Windows-1252 is a superset of ISO-8859-1.

System.Text.Encoding.GetEncoding(1252)
share|improve this answer
2  
Hi This approach is very cumbersome in some situations, e.g. when you have an XML stream with a ISO-8859-1 encoding. You'd need to replace the encoding "iso-8859-1" with "windows-1252" before feeding it to the XML reader. – Andreas Huber Dec 29 '08 at 21:30
    
I tried this, but it does not work with CF3.5 – simmeone Jul 3 '15 at 6:07

This MSDN article says:

The .NET Compact Framework supports character encoding on all devices: Unicode (BE and LE), UTF8, UTF7, and ASCII.

There is limited support for code page encoding and only if the encoding is recognized by the operating system of the device.

The .NET Compact Framework throws a PlatformNotSupportedException if the a required encoding is not available on the device.

I believe all (or at least many) of the ISO encodings are code-page encodings and fall under the "limited support" rule. UTF8 is probably your best bet as a replacement.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi It seems none of the linked pages contain information that could answer the question "Why is ISO-8859-7 supported while ISO-8859-1 isn't?" – Andreas Huber Dec 29 '08 at 21:24
    
I thought the "limited support for code page supporting" wrapped it up rather succinctly, myself. I believe you're stuck with using UTF8. – Otis Dec 29 '08 at 21:36

I know its a bit later but I made an implementation for .net cf of encoding ISO-8859-1, I hope this could help:

namespace System.Text
{
    public class Latin1Encoding : Encoding
    {
        private readonly string m_specialCharset = (char) 0xA0 + @"¡¢£¤¥¦§¨©ª«¬­®¯°±²³´µ¶·¸¹º»¼½¾¿ÀÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈÉÊËÌÍÎÏÐÑÒÓÔÕÖ×ØÙÚÛÜÝÞßàáâãäåæçèéêëìíîïðñòóôõö÷øùúûüýþÿ";

        public override string WebName
        {
            get { return @"ISO-8859-1"; }
        }

        public override int CodePage
        {
            get { return 28591; }
        }

        public override int GetByteCount(char[] chars, int index, int count)
        {
            return count;
        }

        public override int GetBytes(char[] chars, int charIndex, int charCount, byte[] bytes, int byteIndex)
        {
            if (chars == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(@"chars", @"null array");
            if (bytes == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(@"bytes", @"null array");
            if (charIndex < 0)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(@"charIndex");
            if (charCount < 0)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(@"charCount");
            if (chars.Length - charIndex < charCount)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(@"chars");
            if (byteIndex < 0 || byteIndex > bytes.Length)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(@"byteIndex");

            for (int i = 0; i < charCount; i++)
            {
                char ch = chars[charIndex + i];
                int chVal = ch;
                bytes[byteIndex + i] = chVal < 160 ? (byte)ch : (chVal <= byte.MaxValue ? (byte)m_specialCharset[chVal - 160] : (byte)63);
            }

            return charCount;
        }

        public override int GetCharCount(byte[] bytes, int index, int count)
        {
            return count;
        }

        public override int GetChars(byte[] bytes, int byteIndex, int byteCount, char[] chars, int charIndex)
        {
            if (chars == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(@"chars", @"null array");
            if (bytes == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(@"bytes", @"null array");
            if (byteIndex < 0)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(@"byteIndex");
            if (byteCount < 0)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(@"byteCount");
            if (bytes.Length - byteIndex < byteCount)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(@"bytes");
            if (charIndex < 0 || charIndex > chars.Length)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(@"charIndex");

            for (int i = 0; i < byteCount; ++i)
            {
                byte b = bytes[byteIndex + i];
                chars[charIndex + i] = b < 160 ? (char)b : m_specialCharset[b - 160];
            }

            return byteCount;
        }

        public override int GetMaxByteCount(int charCount)
        {
            return charCount;
        }

        public override int GetMaxCharCount(int byteCount)
        {
            return byteCount;
        }
    }
}
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Have you tried uppercasing the character set name? The official registration doesn't include the lowercase name that you provided (which doesn't explain why it accepts lowercased versions of the other ISO-8859 variants).

Name: ISO_8859-1:1987                                    [RFC1345,KXS2]
MIBenum: 4
Source: ECMA registry
Alias: iso-ir-100
Alias: ISO_8859-1
Alias: ISO-8859-1 (preferred MIME name)
Alias: latin1
Alias: l1
Alias: IBM819
Alias: CP819
Alias: csISOLatin1
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It is odd that 8859-1 isn't supported, but that said, UTF-8 does have the ability to represent all of teh 8859-1 characters (and more), so is there a reason you can't just use UTF-8 instead? That's what we do internally, and I just dealt with almost this same issue today. The plus side of using UTF-8 is that you get support for far-east and cyrillic languages without making modifications and without adding weight to the western languages.

share|improve this answer
4  
I don't see how UTF-8 "contains" iso-8859-1. In the former, only pure ASCII characters can be encoded in one byte, in the latter also chars like e.g. Ä can be encoded in one byte. So if you have a file encoded in ISO-8859-1 you cannot correctly read it with the UTF-8 encoding. – Andreas Huber Dec 29 '08 at 21:41
    
Ah, I see - you have text already encoded. I was thinking that you simply needed a mechanism for encoding all of these chanracters – ctacke Dec 29 '08 at 22:06
    
Looks like you'll be manually converting the files, then. Good luck. – Robert C. Barth Dec 29 '08 at 23:59

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