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We can put code in a constructor or a method or an initialization block. What is the use of initialization block? Is it necessary that every java program must have it?

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Do you mean an init() function called by or after the constructoe? Or a sttatic block declared outside any method? –  atk Oct 21 '10 at 12:31
    
I can't see clearly what is your question, maybe the title is a little misleading –  Junior Mayhe Oct 21 '10 at 12:47
    
possible duplicate of Use of Initializers vs Constructors in Java –  Mark Peters Oct 21 '10 at 13:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 27 down vote accepted

First of all, there are two types of initialization blocks:

  • instance initialization blocks, and
  • static initialization blocks.

This code should illustrate the use of them and in which order they are executed:

public class Test {

    static int staticVariable;
    int nonStaticVariable;        

    // Static initialization block:
    // Runs once (when the class is initialized).
    static {
        System.out.println("Static initalization.");
        staticVariable = 5;
    }

    // Instance initialization block:
    // Runs before the constructor each time you instantiate an object
    {
        System.out.println("Instance initialization.");
        nonStaticVariable = 7;
    }

    public Test() {
        System.out.println("Constructor.");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Test();
        new Test();
    }
}

Prints:

Static initalization.
Instance initialization.
Constructor.
Instance initialization.
Constructor.

Instance itialization blocks are useful if you want to have some code run regardless of which constructor is used or if you want to do some instance initialization for anonymous classes.

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This is not exactly what is happening, when you are using initialization blocks. I'll share my answer below.. –  nenito Mar 14 at 11:11
    
@aioobe, What's the point of "instance intialization block" when we can already place those code within the constructor(s)? –  Pacerier Sep 22 at 14:26
    
Thanks. Added a paragraph in the end. –  aioobe Sep 22 at 14:28
    
At the moment it looks like they are executed in order of appearance in the code. The example could be improved in the way the order in code is different to the actual execution order. Also: there can be several initialization blocks and then they are executed in order of appearance (but still before the constructor). –  ᵺṓᵯᶏᵴ Dec 2 at 11:39

would like to add one more point to the answer of @aioobe

Order of execution:

1)static initialization blocks

2)constructors of super classes

3)instance initialization blocks

4)constructor of the class.

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I would also add 'static initialization blocks of super classes' before 1), and 'instance initialization blocks of super classes' before 2) to be 'super specific'. –  Skogen Dec 18 at 16:06

nice answer by aioobe adding few more points

public class StaticTest extends parent {
    static {
        System.out.println("inside satic block");
    }

    StaticTest() {
        System.out.println("inside constructor of child");
    }

    {
        System.out.println("inside initialization block");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new StaticTest();
        new StaticTest();
        System.out.println("inside main");
    }
}

class parent {
    static {
        System.out.println("inside parent Static block");
    }
    {
        System.out.println("inside parent initialisation block");
    }

    parent() {
        System.out.println("inside parent constructor");
    }
}

this gives

inside parent Static block
inside satic block
inside parent initialisation block
inside parent constructor
inside initialization block
inside constructor of child
inside parent initialisation block
inside parent constructor
inside initialization block
inside constructor of child
inside main

its like stating the obvious but seems a little more clear.

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Initialization blocks are executed whenever the class is initialized and before constructors are invoked. They are typically placed above the constructors within braces. It is not at all necessary to include them in your classes.

They are typically used to initialize reference variables. This page gives a good explanation

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According to @Biman, the constructors from superclasses are run before the init block. –  Nicolas Barbulesco Jun 7 at 20:55

The question is not entirely clear, but here's a brief description of ways you can initialise data in an object. Let's suppose you have a class A that holds a list of objects.

1) Put initial values in the field declaration:

class A {
    private List<Object> data = new ArrayList<Object>();
}

2) Assign initial values in the constructor:

class A {
    private List<Object> data;
    public A() {
        data = new ArrayList<Object>();
    }
}

These both assume that you do not want to pass "data" as a constructor argument.

Things get a little tricky if you mix overloaded constructors with internal data like above. Consider:

class B {
    private List<Object> data;
    private String name;
    private String userFriendlyName;

    public B() {
        data = new ArrayList<Object>();
        name = "Default name";
        userFriendlyName = "Default user friendly name";
    }

    public B(String name) {
        data = new ArrayList<Object>();
        this.name = name;
        userFriendlyName = name;
    }

    public B(String name, String userFriendlyName) {
        data = new ArrayList<Object>();
        this.name = name;
        this.userFriendlyName = userFriendlyName;
    }
}

Notice that there is a lot of repeated code. You can fix this by making constructors call each other, or you can have a private initialisation method that each constructor calls:

class B {
    private List<Object> data;
    private String name;
    private String userFriendlyName;

    public B() {
        this("Default name", "Default user friendly name");
    }

    public B(String name) {
        this(name, name);
    }

    public B(String name, String userFriendlyName) {
        data = new ArrayList<Object>();
        this.name = name;
        this.userFriendlyName = userFriendlyName;
    }
}

or

class B {
    private List<Object> data;
    private String name;
    private String userFriendlyName;

    public B() {
        init("Default name", "Default user friendly name");
    }

    public B(String name) {
        init(name, name);
    }

    public B(String name, String userFriendlyName) {
        init(name, userFriendlyName);
    }

    private void init(String _name, String _userFriendlyName) {
        data = new ArrayList<Object>();
        this.name = name;
        this.userFriendlyName = userFriendlyName;
    }
}

The two are (more or less) equivalent.

I hope that gives you some hints on how to initialise data in your objects. I won't talk about static initialisation blocks as that's probably a bit advanced at the moment.

EDIT: I've interpreted your question as "how do I initialise my instance variables", not "how do initialiser blocks work" as initialiser blocks are a relatively advanced concept, and from the tone of the question it seems you're asking about the simpler concept. I could be wrong.

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Even if you interpreted the question as "How do I initialise my instance variables?", your answer does not mention that it can be done with initializers. –  ᵺṓᵯᶏᵴ Dec 2 at 11:33

To know the use of static Initialization block , refer the Class.forName source code also this article of it's use http://cephas.net/blog/2005/07/31/java-classfornamestring-classname-and-jdbc/ , they use initialization block for dynamic class loading.

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The sample code, which is approved as an answer here is correct, but I disagree with it. It does not shows what is happening and I'm going to show you a good example to understand how actually the JVM works:

package test;

    class A {
        A() {
            print();
        }

        void print() {
            System.out.println("A");
        }
    }

    class B extends A {
        static int staticVariable2 = 123456;
        static int staticVariable;

        static
        {
            System.out.println(staticVariable2);
            System.out.println("Static Initialization block");
            staticVariable = Math.round(3.5f);
        }

        int instanceVariable;

        {
            System.out.println("Initialization block");
            instanceVariable = Math.round(3.5f);
            staticVariable = Math.round(3.5f);
        }

        B() {
            System.out.println("Constructor");
        }

        public static void main(String[] args) {
            A a = new B();
            a.print();
            System.out.println("main");
        }

        void print() {
            System.out.println(instanceVariable);
        }

        static void somethingElse() {
            System.out.println("Static method");
        }
    }

Before to start commenting on the source code, I'll give you a short explanation of static variables of a class:

First thing is that they are called class variables, they belong to the class not to particular instance of the class. All instances of the class share this static(class) variable. Each and every variable has a default value, depending on primitive or reference type. Another thing is when you reassign the static variable in some of the members of the class (initialization blocks, constructors, methods, properties) and doing so you are changing the value of the static variable not for particular instance, you are changing it for all instances. To conclude static part I will say that the static variables of a class are created not when you instantiate for first time the class, they are created when you define your class, they exist in JVM without the need of any instances. Therefor the correct access of static members from external class (class in which they are not defined) is by using the class name following by dot and then the static member, which you want to access (template: <CLASS_NAME>.<STATIC_VARIABLE_NAME>).

Now let's look at the code above:

The entry point is the main method - there are just three lines of code. I want to refer to the example which is currently approved. According to it the first thing which must be printed after printing "Static Initialization block" is "Initialization block" and here is my disagreement, the non-static initialization block is not called before the constructor, it is called before any initializations of the constructors of the class in which the initialization block is defined. The constructor of the class is the first thing involved when you create an object (instance of the class) and then when you enter the constructor the first part called is either implicit (default) super constructor or explicit super constructor or explicit call to another overloaded constructor (but at some point if there is a chain of overloaded constructors, the last one calls a super constructor, implicitly or explicitly).

There is polymorphic creation of an object, but before to enter the class B and its main method, the JVM initializes all class(static) variables, then goes through the static initialization blocks if any exist and then enters the class B and starts with the execution of the main method. It goes to the constructor of class B then immediately (implicitly) calls constructor of class A, using polymorphism the method(overridden method) called in the body of the constructor of class A is the one which is defined in class B and in this case the variable named instanceVariable is used before reinitialization. After closing the constructor of class be the thread is returned to constructor of class B but it goes first to the non-static initialization block before printing "Constructor". For better understanding debug it with some IDE, I prefer Eclipse.

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1  
TL;DR OP simply asked for an explanation of the initialization block, not a long-winded explanation on the fundamentals of static variables, constructors, or your IDE preferences. –  b1nary.atr0phy Aug 29 at 7:19

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