Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to build a nice API (C#) to make it easier for people to consume, I think I've seen this before and want to know how to do this:

MyNamespace.Cars car = null;

if(someTestCondition)
       car = new Honda();
else    
       car = new Toyota();

car.Drive(40);

Is this possible? If so, what needs to be done?

share|improve this question
    
I hope you do not expect both cars to be driven based on that singular car.Drive method call. The variable names must be different for your Honda and Toyota – Bob Dec 29 '08 at 21:55
    
ok I changed the code to make it more accurate thanks. – Blankman Dec 29 '08 at 22:05
up vote 10 down vote accepted
Interface Car
{
void Drive(int miles);
}

class Honda : Car
{
...
}
class Toyota : Car
{
...
}
share|improve this answer
    
You beat me to it. I'll remove mine – Jacob Adams Dec 29 '08 at 21:51
    
that should be interface ICar – foson Dec 29 '08 at 21:54
    
Hey man, no need - this is no competition :) – Otávio Décio Dec 29 '08 at 21:54
    
@foson - I did that at first but changed it to Car so it would fit with his sample code. – Otávio Décio Dec 29 '08 at 21:55
    
@ocdecio.myopenid.com, Then change your class lines to use "Car" instead of "ICar" =] – strager Dec 29 '08 at 21:56

You could do this a couple of different ways. You could declare an abstract base class or you could have an interface that your object implement. I believe the "C#" preferred method would be to have an interface. Something like:

public interface ICar
{
	public Color Color { get; set; }

	void Drive(int speed);
	void Stop();

}

public class Honda : ICar
{

	#region ICar Members

	public Color Color { get; set; }

	public void Drive(int speed)
	{
		throw new NotImplementedException();
	}

	public void Stop()
	{
		throw new NotImplementedException();
	}

	#endregion
}

public class Toyota : ICar
{
	#region ICar Members

	public Color Color { get; set; }

	public void Drive(int speed)
	{
		throw new NotImplementedException();
	}

	public void Stop()
	{
		throw new NotImplementedException();
	}

	#endregion
}
share|improve this answer

I see everyone is pushing interface / abstract base class changes to you. The pseudocode you provided more or less implies you already have this in place.

I'll pose something else:

You'll want to create a "CarFactory" that will return a specific implementation of your base class / interface. The Create method can take your test conditions as parameters so you create the correct car.

EDIT: Here's a link from MSDN -- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms954600.aspx

EDIT: See the comments for another link.

share|improve this answer
    
Based on the changes to his question, I think your answer is the best fit now. – Aaron Smith Dec 29 '08 at 22:18
    
Posting an example would be really helpful, because he probably hasn't dealt with factories before. – strager Dec 29 '08 at 22:28
    
dofactory.com/Patterns/PatternAbstract.aspx for an Abstract Factory Example. – Steven Behnke Dec 29 '08 at 23:19

Make a class named Cars. Give it the Drive method. Extend that base class in your Honda and Toyota classes.

share|improve this answer
namespace MyNameSpace
{
  public interface Cars
  {
    public void Drive(int miles);
  }
  public class Honda : Cars
  {
    public void Drive(int miles) { ... }
  }
  public class Toyota : Cars
  {
    public void Drive(int miles) { ... }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i changed my code, is your solution still accurate? – Blankman Dec 29 '08 at 22:06
    
Interesting how some of us saw that as miles driven and others of us saw it as the speed the car was moving at. A think we need a more complete functional spec. ;) – Steven Behnke Dec 29 '08 at 22:42

Don't forget the namespace, also see my comment in the question about variable names

namespace MyNamespace {
    public interface Cars {
    	void Drive(int speed);
    }

    public class Honda : Cars {
    	public void Drive(int speed) { 
     	}
    }
    public class Toyota : Cars {
    	public void Drive(int speed) {

    	}
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Make an abstract class called Cars with an abstract method called Drive(). Subclass it and add implementations.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.