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Stupid Question Regarding If-Else's Simultaneous Execution in C++ or C
Is it possble to execute both if and else part of an if — else control statement ?

Hello everyone.. I had a question in an interview like this which i couldn't answer. Consider Following code block. Assume necessary header files.

if(.......)
{
    printf("hello");
}
else
{
    printf("world");
}

without moving/adding any code & without use of additional printing statements bring output as "Hello world"..You have to write the missing condition in if statement.. is it possible to execute both blocks by some condition?? Please help

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@Steve there was a nice suggestion with setjump(). It's possible that they expected that solution. I'm not sure, but will a forked process print to the same console? –  ruslik Oct 21 '10 at 14:19
1  
This is NOT a duplicate of the other questions. The OP simply put the wrong title on the question. It does NOT ask you to execute the if and else, it simply asks you to insert a condition that generates the requested output. My solution is below. –  Larry Lustig Oct 21 '10 at 14:27
    
@Larry: I assumed that was a mistake in the question that allows your answer. It says, "without use of additional printing statements", which I took to include calls to printf, whether they're statements or just expressions. Also the text "is it possible to execute both blocks by some condition" is a dupe. As against that, making this a completely different question, the requested output is "Hello world" (note capital H and space), suggesting that the first block should not be executed. Also the fork() solution doesn't order the blocks, they could run in either order or simultaneously. –  Steve Jessop Oct 21 '10 at 14:38
1  
I can't answer this question any more, but I want to!! If you abuse some little used C syntax you can do it without vfork. if(fork() ? (sleep(1), 0) : 1) {. The sleep ensures the correct order. –  jdizzle Oct 21 '10 at 16:04
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marked as duplicate by Steve Jessop, sharptooth, Paul R, delnan, Thomas Lötzer Oct 21 '10 at 14:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

13 Answers

try fork() ! (and join afterwards). That's the only feature involving quantum mechanics that I know of.

fork() returns two distinct values at a time, which only the Schrödinger's cat is capable of.

NOTE: In a comment, Donal Fellows suggests:

You'll get more reliable behavior with !vfork()

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10  
...and hope they print in the right order. –  user470379 Oct 21 '10 at 14:08
2  
Wouldn't that be terrible programming practice? Why would they expect someone to know (let alone do) that in an interview? :/ –  townsean Oct 21 '10 at 14:10
2  
@townsean: this is a great code to do fork, that way you make the father do one thing while the son is doing another. if the if was if (0 == fork()) it would do diffrent things for diffrent threads, and that is very desireable, for example if you want to execute an external process, and make the father wait till it finish. –  none Oct 21 '10 at 14:15
1  
good answer Benoit! –  none Oct 21 '10 at 14:16
1  
You'll get more reliable behavior with !vfork() –  Donal Fellows Oct 21 '10 at 14:20
show 9 more comments

This will work

if(schrodingers_cat_is_dead())
{
    printf("hello");
}
else
{
    printf("world");
}

Unfortunately, as soon as you look at the output, not only will it collapse into the state of only producing "hello" or "world", but there's a 50% chance you will have murdered a cat.

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3  
This was pretty funny. Thanks. –  San Jacinto Oct 21 '10 at 14:38
4  
Would the down voter please explain why they do not have a sense of humour? –  JeremyP Nov 15 '10 at 10:27
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If you can put in a macro definition as "part" of that condition...

if (1
#define else if (1)
)
{
    printf("hello");
}
else
{
    printf("world");
}

Then that code will indeed print "helloworld". It's a horrible, dirty trick though; my soul is probably in trouble for mentioning it!

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Yeah, that's great too :) Don't forget to #undef it. I think you could just #define else. It will just scope the printf("world");. –  Benoit Oct 21 '10 at 14:25
    
I don't get the idea... –  Ichibann Oct 21 '10 at 14:27
1  
this will do : if(1) {printf("hello");} if(1) {printf("world");} –  Benoit Oct 21 '10 at 14:28
    
thanks Donal.....It's Ok....But it doesn't make any sense...Though it achieves the intended aim very well. lets say " by Hook or by CROOK!!" –  Prashant Oct 21 '10 at 14:30
3  
@Prashant: Sense?! You're getting deep voodoo hackery tricks here, not good structured programming. :-) –  Donal Fellows Oct 21 '10 at 14:32
show 1 more comment

It depends on the exact phrasing of the question. As you describe it, the question does not ask you to execute both branches of the if statement. It asks you to insert a condition that results in printing "hello world" without changing anything else.

If you have complete freedom in what you put in the condition, you can use this solution:

 if(printf("hello ") == -1)
 {
     printf("hello");
 }
 else
 {
     printf("world");
 }

However, the solution uses "printf" in the condition, which is ruled out by one of the rules you gave. What's not clear to me is whether the printf prohibition also applies to what you write in the condition.

Note: Answer is edited to reflect the comments. The original answer ignored the prohibition on print statements.

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..without moving/adding any code & without use of additional printing statements bring output as "Hello world".. So, this does not meet requirements. –  N 1.1 Oct 21 '10 at 14:34
    
The problem is… the question asks for no additional printing statements. While you could try arguing before the judge that the printf you inserted is a printing expression (tricky!) I suspect it's not going to get you credit. Nice try though. –  Donal Fellows Oct 21 '10 at 14:34
    
Well, you guys may well be right depending on the original phraseology of the question. If you're allowed to enter anything you want in the condition (and the prohibition on adding code only applies outside the condition) then the solution stands. But if the prohibition applies inside the condition as well, obviously my solution is invalid. –  Larry Lustig Oct 21 '10 at 14:55
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You can, but it's probably bad practice. Seems the interviewer was testing your knowledge of the language. Built with gcc 4.1.2.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  if(!printf("hello ")) {
    printf("hello");
  } else {
    printf("world");
  }

  return 0;
}
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Please tell How....It will add to my knowledge ..:-) –  Prashant Oct 21 '10 at 14:34
    
@Prashant: Updated with code –  Andrew Sledge Oct 21 '10 at 15:51
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There is one possible way, it is not recommended.

if(check==true)
{
 printf("dont do this");
 goto condition1;
}
else
{
 condition1: ////this is crazy
 printf("Dont do this ever");
}
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3  
+1 for warped thinking, but it fails the "without moving/adding any code" constraint? –  Paul Oct 21 '10 at 14:12
    
You cheated! no way you can put anything inside the {} blocks according to the question :) –  Benoit Oct 21 '10 at 14:12
1  
You're right I did cheat, no soup for me. This question is pretty insane –  Kirit Chandran Oct 21 '10 at 14:17
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No, it's not possible. Either the first block or the else block will get executed; that is the nature of an if statement.

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You're wrong. :-) –  ABCD Nov 6 '10 at 12:12
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There's no way to execute both branches of an if/else without exploiting it with weird things. If a condition is true then the else won't get executed and viceversa.

They're absolutely mutually exclusive.

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Not without iterating over it again. I don't think you can do any Duff device like craziness in if statements. I suppose you could use goto, you say just by writing the condition.

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In a debugger you could step through the if block, then move execution to the else block to execute, but that's just a silly answer to what seems to me to be a silly question.

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Wouldn't this work?

if !(printf("hello")){
}
else{
   printf(" world");
}
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Have you read the conditions? without moving/adding any code & without use of additional printing statements bring output as "Hello world".. –  Buhake Sindi Oct 21 '10 at 14:31
    
...so much for my first answer here :) –  singhularity Oct 21 '10 at 14:35
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The easiest way I think is this:

//if(.......)
{
    printf("hello");
}
//else
{
    printf("world");
}
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1  
else can't exists without if. –  Buhake Sindi Oct 21 '10 at 14:26
    
My bad :) Fixed it –  Sergio Oct 21 '10 at 14:53
    
This question states .You have to write the missing condition in if statement.. –  Buhake Sindi Oct 21 '10 at 15:15
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you could try :

if()
{
printf("hello");
goto Found;
}
else
{
Found: printf("world");
}
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