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I'm just mucking around with C as a learner, and wrote this little function...

char *getPlaceSuffix(int number) {

    static char *suffixes[] = {"st", "nd", "rd", "th"};

    if (number >= 11 && number <= 13) {
        return suffixes[3];
    } else {
        while (number > 10) {
            number -= 10;   
        }

        if (number >= 1 && number <= 3) {
            return suffixes[number - 1];
        } else {
            return suffixes[3];
        }               
    }
}   

I tweeted the link, and Konrad Rudolph informed me my method of getting the least significant number was O(n) and not very efficient.

Unfortunately, it’s O(n) for very large number – to make it O(logn), adjust the while loop for higher powers of 10 …

Source

I'm not too familiar with Big O notation, but I get the gist that O(n) isn't too efficient?

As you can see from my code sample, I deduct 10 until the number is one digit long, so I can compare it to see which suffix is appropriate. I had a quick play with division and modulus but couldn't figure it out.

So, my question is, what is the best way to get the least significant digit in a number?

I'm still learning, so please go easy on me :)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
8  
Surprising that someone who can perform complexity analysis on your code doesn't suggest that you use the modulo operator (%), which is basically O(1). – You Oct 21 '10 at 14:16
    
@You: haha, got me. – Konrad Rudolph Oct 21 '10 at 14:17
2  
Consider using the zero'th element of arrays normally. It's standard C usage: static char *suffixes[] = {"th", "st", "nd", "rd"}; and either return suffixes[0]; or return suffixes[RIGHTMOST_DIGIT];. – pmg Oct 21 '10 at 14:20
    
@pmg Thanks - I am very much interested in knowing the C way of doing things. I noticed the same pattern in the get months example in K&R. – alex Oct 21 '10 at 23:34
up vote 15 down vote accepted
number % 10

should work.

share|improve this answer
2  
Whoops - a bit embarrassing on my behalf! – alex Oct 21 '10 at 14:17

"had a quick play with division and modulus but couldn't figure it out."

 number = number % 10

will do it

And if we're really bothered about efficiency for this code (why?) then

char *getPlaceSuffix(int number) {

    static char *suffixes[] = {"th", "st", "nd", "rd", "th",  "th", "th", "th", "th", "th"};
    int h = number %100;
    int d = number %10
    return (h == 11 or h == 12 or h == 13)? suffixes[0]:suffixes[d];
} 
share|improve this answer
    
“why?” – is that a trick question? If not: there’s a big difference between an algorithm that performs in O(n) and one that performs in O(1). Just try calling the code in a loop with high numbers and observe the UI’s responsiveness go under. As for your optimization, apart from the fact that it only shaves off a constant factor (as opposed to reducing the asymptotic complexity), it will yield the wrong result for inputs 11, 12 and 13. – Konrad Rudolph Oct 21 '10 at 14:24
    
@Konrad: wrong results? The complaints department is on the 11st floor, take it up with them. It'll be the 112nd complaint they've had this week. – Steve Jessop Oct 21 '10 at 14:29
    
"Just try calling the code in a loop " Yes, but how likely is that? the OP is just learning the language, and striving for maximal efficiency here is Premature Optimization, IMO. n%10 is O(1) on nearly all processors, in any case, so there is no "asymptopic efficiency" to worry about (as long as "number" is an int). – The Archetypal Paul Oct 21 '10 at 14:38
    
Got me on the 11/12/13,though :) Fixed (also fixed for one-hundred-and-eleventh, etc) – The Archetypal Paul Oct 21 '10 at 14:41
    
@Paul: I’d argue strongly that using an asymptotically better algorithm that isn’t conceptually any harder to implement (nor longer) is not a premature optimization by any sensible definition of the term, in particular not when designing a general-purpose function. An optimization is premature only if it has a trade-off. – Konrad Rudolph Oct 21 '10 at 14:55

If number is positive, then number = number % 10; has the same effect as while (number >= 10) number -= 10;. Note that I've used >=, not > as in your code.

So, cover the case of getting 0 as the result of the modulus, and you should be good.

[Edit: oops, your code already would handle that 0, correctly selecting th. So you're fine. What modulus code did you try?]

"I get the gist that O(n) isn't too efficient?"

Your code isn't too efficient. O(n) means that in the limit as n approaches infinity, your code takes time no worse than proportional to n. In fact we don't really need to worry about limits at infinity, and we don't need to worry about bounds - your loop executes a number of times approximately proportional to n.

In this case, that's inefficient because a much faster solution exists. By definition, a solution which is O(1) is also O(n), so O(n) doesn't actually mean "inefficient", because it specifies an upper bound on time, not a lower bound. Beware that the notation is widely abused, though. People often say "O(n)" to mean that some algorithm takes time at least proportional to n, when they should say "Ω(n)" or "Θ(n)".

share|improve this answer
    
I forget what modulus I tried, but it turns out I've already used modulus in my C functions. I must of been having one of those moments were I forgot to use my brain properly :P. Thanks very much for your answer. – alex Oct 21 '10 at 23:40

Modulus:

number = number % 10;
share|improve this answer

The function that you have posted on your web site is incorrect. What will it return if we pass it 113?

char *getPlaceSuffix(int number) {
  static char *suffixes[] = {"th", "st", "nd", "rd"};

  if (number >= 11 && number <= 13) { return suffixes[0]; }
  else {  
    number %= 10;

    if (number >= 1 && number <= 3) { return suffixes[number]; }
    else { return suffixes[0]; }
  }
}

113 will be mod'd by 10, which will result in 3, then it will return suffixes[3], which is "rd".

113 should be 113th, not 113rd (which I'm assuming is pronounced "one-hundred thirturd" -- funny, but not correct.)

Here is how the function should read:

char *getPlaceSuffix(int number) {
  static char *suffixes[] = {"th", "st", "nd", "rd"};

  if (number>100) number %= 100;

  if (number >= 11 && number <= 13) { return suffixes[0]; }
  else {  
    number %= 10;

    if (number >= 1 && number <= 3) { return suffixes[number]; }
    else { return suffixes[0]; }
  }
}

The addition of if (number>100) number %= 100; should make this function return the correct answer.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks for your answer. I missed that completely. – alex Mar 3 '11 at 5:25

Can you just take the number and mod it by 10 and that's your least significant number? When you are deducting by 10 until you can't anymore, you're exactly what modulus was meant for.

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