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Is there a way to do the following using Linq:

foreach (var c in collection)
{
   c.PropertyToSet = value;
}

To clarify, I want to iterate through each object in a collection and then update a property on each object.

My use case is I have a bunch of comments on a blog post and I want to iterate through each comment on a blog post and set the datetime on the blog post to be +10 hours. I could do it in SQL, but I want to keep it in the business layer.

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14 Answers 14

up vote 204 down vote accepted

While you can use a ForEach extension method, if you want to use just the framework you can do

collection.Select(c => {c.PropertyToSet = value; return c;}).ToList();

The ToList is needed in order to evaluate the select immediately due to lazy evaluation.

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2  
I upvoted this because it's a pretty nice solution... the only reason I like the extension method is that it makes it a little clearer to understand exactly what is going on... however your solution is still pretty sweet –  lomaxx Dec 30 '08 at 0:07
2  
If collection was an ObservableCollection say, then changing items in place rather than creating a new list can be useful. –  Cameron MacFarland Mar 5 '10 at 22:44
1  
this is a great tip, +1 –  adrianos Jun 6 '11 at 9:56
1  
@desaivv yeah this is a bit of a syntax abuse, so Resharper is warning you about this. –  Cameron MacFarland Apr 25 '12 at 7:07
2  
@KonradMorawski You're doing a select on an IQueryable not an IEnumerable, so most likely LINQ to SQL. This only works on LINQ to objects. –  Cameron MacFarland Aug 23 '12 at 14:30
collection.ToList().ForEach(c => c.PropertyToSet = value);
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simplest. thanks a lot –  iamserious Mar 19 '12 at 15:23
    
There's a semi-colon in there that shouldn't be there =) –  Niklas Apr 2 '12 at 14:46
    
What should i do to update more than one property? –  Santhosh Kumar Jul 26 '13 at 12:31
3  
@SanthoshKumar: Use collection.ToList().ForEach(c => { c.Property1ToSet = value1; c.Property2ToSet = value2; }); –  Ε Г И І И О Jul 28 '13 at 6:45
    
I am using VB.NET, this is not working for me :( –  VeeKayBee Sep 11 '13 at 6:26

I am doing this

Collection.All(c => { c.needsChange = value; return true; });
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I think this is the cleanest way to do it. –  wcm Oct 9 '13 at 15:08

I actually found an extension method that will do what I want nicely

public static IEnumerable<T> ForEach<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source,
    Action<T> act)
{
    foreach (T element in source) act(element);
    return source;
}
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3  
nice :) Lomaxx, maybe add an example so peeps can see it in 'action' (boom tish!). –  Pure.Krome Apr 10 '09 at 10:51

There is no built-in extension method to do this. Although defining one is fairly straight forward. At the bottom of the post is a method I defined called Iterate. It can be used like so

collection.Iterate(c => { c.PropertyToSet = value;} );

Iterate Source

public static void Iterate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T> callback)
{
    if (enumerable == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("enumerable");
    }

    IterateHelper(enumerable, (x, i) => callback(x));
}

public static void Iterate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T,int> callback)
{
    if (enumerable == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("enumerable");
    }

    IterateHelper(enumerable, callback);
}

private static void IterateHelper<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Action<T,int> callback)
{
    int count = 0;
    foreach (var cur in enumerable)
    {
        callback(cur, count);
        count++;
    }
}
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Is Iterate necessary, whats wrong with Count, Sum, Avg or other existing extension method that returns a scalar value? –  AnthonyWJones Dec 29 '08 at 22:32
    
this is pretty close to what i want but a little.. involved. The blog post I posted has a similar implementation but with fewer lines of code. –  lomaxx Dec 29 '08 at 22:57
    
The IterateHelper seems overkill. The overload that doesn't take an index ends up doing alot more extra work (convert callback to lambda which takes index, keep a count which is never used). I understand it's reuse, but it's a workaround for just using a forloop anyway so it should be efficient. –  Cameron MacFarland Dec 29 '08 at 23:20
    
@Cameron, IterateHelper serves 2 purposes. 1) Single implementation and 2) allows for ArgumentNullException to be thrown at call time vs. use. C# iterators are delayed executed, having the helper prevents the odd behavior of an exception being thrown during iteration. –  JaredPar Dec 30 '08 at 3:42
    
@JaredPar: Except you're not using an iterator. There's no yield statement. –  Cameron MacFarland Dec 30 '08 at 7:27

My 2 pennies:-

 collection.Count(v => (v.PropertyToUpdate = newValue) == null);
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5  
I like the thinking, but it's not really clear what the code is doing –  lomaxx Dec 29 '08 at 22:43
6  
Yeah I'm not sure I'd want this in production code. –  Cameron MacFarland Dec 29 '08 at 23:18

No, LINQ doesn't support a manner of mass updating. The only shorter way would be to use a ForEach extension method - http://stackoverflow.com/questions/101265/why-is-there-not-a-foreach-extension-method-on-the-ienumerable-interface#101303

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You can use Magiq (http://magiq.codeplex.com), a batch operation framework for linq. Bye!

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I've tried a few variations on this, and I keep going back to this guy's solution.

http://www.hookedonlinq.com/UpdateOperator.ashx

Again, this is somebody else's solution. But I've compiled the code into a small library, and use it fairly regularly.

I'm going to paste his code here, for the off chance that his site(blog) ceases to exist at some point in the future. (There's nothing worse than seeing a post that says "Here is the exact answer you need", Click, and Dead URL.)

    public static class UpdateExtensions {

    public delegate void Func<TArg0>(TArg0 element);

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes an Update statement block on all elements in an IEnumerable<T> sequence.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TSource">The source element type.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="source">The source sequence.</param>
    /// <param name="update">The update statement to execute for each element.</param>
    /// <returns>The numer of records affected.</returns>
    public static int Update<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource> update)
    {
        if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (update == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("update");
        if (typeof(TSource).IsValueType)
            throw new NotSupportedException("value type elements are not supported by update.");

        int count = 0;
        foreach (TSource element in source)
        {
            update(element);
            count++;
        }
        return count;
    }
}



int count = drawingObjects
        .Where(d => d.IsSelected && d.Color == Colors.Blue)
        .Update(e => { e.Color = Color.Red; e.Selected = false; } );
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ListOfStuff.Where(w => w.Thing == value).ToList().ForEach(f => f.OtherThing = vauleForNewOtherThing);  

Not sure if this is overusing Linq or not but has worked for me when wanting to update a specific items in the list for a specific condition.

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I assume you want to change values inside a query so you could write a function for it

void DoStuff()
{
    Func<string, Foo, bool> test = (y, x) => { x.Bar = y; return true; };
    List<Foo> mylist = new List<Foo>();
    var v = from x in mylist
            where test("value", x)
            select x;
}

class Foo
{
    string Bar { get; set; }
}

But not shure if this is what you mean.

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This is going in sort of the right direction by would require something to enumerate v, else it'll do nothing. –  AnthonyWJones Dec 29 '08 at 22:35

You can use LINQ to convert your collection to an array and then invoke Array.ForEach():

Array.ForEach(MyCollection.ToArray(), item=>item.DoSomeStuff());

Obviously this will not work with collections of structs or inbuilt types like integers or strings.

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Here is the extension method I use...

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes an Update statement block on all elements in an  IEnumerable of T
    /// sequence.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TSource">The source element type.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="source">The source sequence.</param>
    /// <param name="action">The action method to execute for each element.</param>
    /// <returns>The number of records affected.</returns>
    public static int Update<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource> action)
    {
        if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
        if (typeof (TSource).IsValueType)
            throw new NotSupportedException("value type elements are not supported by update.");

        var count = 0;
        foreach (var element in source)
        {
            action(element);
            count++;
        }
        return count;
    }
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Why "value type elements are not supported by update"?? Nothing interferes that! –  abatishchev Aug 17 '10 at 14:13
    
That was specific to the project I was working on. I suppose it wouldn't matter in most cases. Lately I've reworked that and renamed it Run(...), removed the value type thing and changed it to return void and dropped the count code. –  Bill Forney Oct 22 '10 at 4:44
    
That aligns it with Reactive extensions Run method... –  Bill Forney Oct 22 '10 at 4:45

For my single item collection (List<string>) I just did the following to change a big string of ugly into just 8 chars. One stmt to update the whole collection. Easy.

myCollection= myCollection.Select(m => m.Substring(0,8)).ToArray();   
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This doesn't answer the question –  reggaeguitar May 7 at 15:56

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